I make the design with as many up as I need on the master page, linking the frames where the numbers will go. Then I make the list using Excel, copy paste to ID and apply a paragraph style with "start in next frame" option. Click the outbox on the pasted text to get a loaded cursor and delete the frame. Then just shift-click over the first textframe on a live page to have as many "tickets" added as needed automatically.
If you are still reading this then perhaps you are looking for a simple and reliable way to number a couple of lists in a Word document. If you read John's article then you have already been informed that field numbering is simple and robust. If you are like 9 out of 10 Word users in my office then anything more than 1. space space Blah, blah "enter" 2. space space Blah, blah ... defies simple! If that applies to you, then the "SeqField Numbering" Add-In presented later in this page is for you.
I have a file that displays the text "Page 1" in the center of the worksheet. I have not been able to find a way to stop the page number from displaying. There is no header/footer, no "background", no other special items that I could find that would force the display of this. It does not appear during the printing so it's not a "watermark". It merely displays in my view when I'm working in the worksheet. Help... Hi you're in page break preview view ... choose view / normal from the menu Cheers JulieD "whalenohana"
Hello! I already have automatic numbering set up (to change paragraph numbers automatically when paragraphs are moved within a document) but I would also like to have automatic lettering within the same document that is independent from the numbering. Example, paragraph 1 references Exhibit A, paragraph 2 references Exhibit B, so on and so forth. Currently using the above referenced method, the auto numbering lettering then follows as if the letters are a representation of the corresponding number (if that makes sense), ex: 1 B 3 C 5 D. How do I have the number sequencing independent from the letter sequence? Thank you in advance!

Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.
Hi Jason! Hard to say when I’m not sure which part isn’t working for you. If the numbering isn’t continuing across separate frames, you need to make sure you’re using a list. If they are in the wrong order, remember it uses the paste/creation order to number them. If neither of those fix it, let me know what specific issue you’re having. Good luck!
Here, the field code SEQ is the winning choice. SEQ is a sequence numbering code often used for things like figures or illustrations (think “Figure 1”). What makes it an ideal choice here is the ability to name each sequence separately. In other words, we can define one numbering sequence for interrogatories, another one for requests for production, and a third one for requests for admission. Microsoft Word will be able to keep each numbering sequence separate because each will have a distinct name.
To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.
I create a CStatic object and write some text to the object but the text is too long to display in the work area but I don't konw how to add a vscroll to a CStatic object who can help me? I would say instead of a CStatic, use a CEdit control with the ReadOnly flag set. Because static controls by default aren't scrollable, so even if you add a scrollbar to it, you will have to manage the entire thing yourself (drawing, scrolling....), more trouble than it's worth. Ali R. "Smallfrogs" wrote in message news:eLAO92y7DHA.2832@tk2msft...
You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.

If the sequence of real numbers (an) is such that all the terms are less than some real number M, then the sequence is said to be bounded from above. In other words, this means that there exists M such that for all n, an ≤ M. Any such M is called an upper bound. Likewise, if, for some real m, an ≥ m for all n greater than some N, then the sequence is bounded from below and any such m is called a lower bound. If a sequence is both bounded from above and bounded from below, then the sequence is said to be bounded.
Although sequences are a type of function, they are usually distinguished notationally from functions in that the input is written as a subscript rather than in parentheses, i.e. an rather than f(n). There are terminological differences as well: the value of a sequence at the input 1 is called the "first element" of the sequence, the value at 2 is called the "second element", etc. Also, while a function abstracted from its input is usually denoted by a single letter, e.g. f, a sequence abstracted from its input is usually written by a notation such as {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n\in A}} , or just as {\displaystyle (a_{n})} . Here A is the domain, or index set, of the sequence.
This may be a toughie, I use Word to print out order forms for my shop, right now I use a stamp to give each one a unique number just for reference (you know the ones with the dials that updates whenever use). Anyways was wanting to somehow make a macro or something in Word that will automatically increment a order number on the form as I print them.

CK Note: Word 2007 - 2013 interface has an different automatic numbering scheme which I have been told is much less subject to corruption. Microsoft Word 2010 Bible by Herb Tyson, MVP. However numbering is still very imperfect in these later versions. I still recommend following Shauna Kelly's step-by-step instructions (see above) if setting up numbering in a template or in a document likely to be heavily edited. If you start without doing this and end up with "spaghetti numbering," fixing it will be a very large chore!


I have several xml files (SMS backup files) I am editing where I want to insert sequential numbering. The number in the id field shown in bold italics below has been replaced with a unique string to allow for a find and replace to be done sequentially giving, e.g. xml a) containing id's 1 to 25, xml b) containing id's 26 to 50, xml c) containing id's 51 to 75 and so on.
All I want to know is, how do you link fields, like {SEQ}, to a style – so that if I select/apply style “Figure Caption” (my style, I also have “Table Caption”), I get not just the attributes of the style (what it looks like, where it is on the page etc.) but I get a chapter (or section) number + a sequence number added, (e.g. “2-3”). I know about STYLEREF and SEQ Figure # and/or calling a section number (if required) – but I can’t find out how to take the simple and to me obvious step to have sequential numbering (prefixed with either “Figure” or “Table”) attached to my Figure Caption style. It all seems to be a two-step process: (i) select the style, (ii) select the numbering. I want to do both at style level. I want to see/get (e.g.) “Figure 2-3: Linking figure numbering to styles” just by applying my “Figure Caption” style to my figure caption text “Linking figure numbering to styles”. Please, only tell me how to do that, how to link chapter/sequence numbering via a style – i.e. in just one step – applying the style.

we have printed AP checks using the check number from 0000000001 to 0000000006, but we havent posted those batches. we have only one checbook. Now can we restart the check number from 000001. Then do we need to delete the previous batches for checks printed. What is the best approach in this regard. Thanks in Advance, Arun. In the Post Payables Checks batch window (Transactions > Purchasing > Post Checks), choose the batch in question, then select Reprint Checks from the drop-down list. Enter 000001 for your starting check number. You will also need to go ...
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.

If you make a list of things you need to do, starting with number 1 and continuing until all your tasks are accounted for, then you’ve made a sequential list. Something that is sequential often follows a numerical or alphabetical order, but it can also describe things that aren’t numbered but still need to take place in a logical order, such as the sequential steps you follow for running a program on your computer.
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