WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
Hi Silver, Try going to File/Page Setup/Header-Footer/Custom Header/Should be the button shown in the header box with the # sign in it. Larry -- keithl816 ------------------------------------------------------------------------ keithl816's Profile: http://www.excelforum.com/member.php?action=getinfo&userid=21287 View this thread: http://www.excelforum.com/showthread.php?threadid=498476 ...
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.
is defined as the set of all sequences {\displaystyle (x_{i})_{i\in \mathbb {N} }} such that for each i, {\displaystyle x_{i}} is an element of {\displaystyle X_{i}} . The canonical projections are the maps pi : X → Xi defined by the equation {\displaystyle p_{i}((x_{j})_{j\in \mathbb {N} })=x_{i}} . Then the product topology on X is defined to be the coarsest topology (i.e. the topology with the fewest open sets) for which all the projections pi are continuous. The product topology is sometimes called the Tychonoff topology.
There is only one prerequisite to using the macro: you need to make sure that your document contains a bookmark named Serial. This bookmark should reference the serial number in your document, as you want it to appear in the first printed document. (When you are through running the macro, you can save the document and the serial number will be ready for the next time you want to use it.)
A sequence can be thought of as a list of elements with a particular order. Sequences are useful in a number of mathematical disciplines for studying functions, spaces, and other mathematical structures using the convergence properties of sequences. In particular, sequences are the basis for series, which are important in differential equations and analysis. Sequences are also of interest in their own right and can be studied as patterns or puzzles, such as in the study of prime numbers.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
I’d like to use this for Exhibits/Appedices. If we refer to the same Exhibit # in a footnote or elsewhere in the document, and then the Exhibit reference is moved, it causes an error in the footnote or reference. Is there a way to cross-reference this, or to have it cross-reference automatically? Lawyers want to use this but I can’t see them bothering to cross-reference the footnotes. Thanks.

- [Instructor] In this week's Word tip I'd like to address a question I'm often asked by people working in tables here in Microsoft Word and that is is there a way to quickly have numbers automatically fill up cells in the table much like they might in Microsoft Excel when you have incremental numbers that need to appear by simple clicking and dragging the corner of a cell. Well, yes, it can be done here in the table in Microsoft Word. It's not done the same way but it is just as easy and we're going to do it with this file, LeafAndMortar Inventory 040. If you have the exercise files, open it up. Now, if you don't have the exercise files, just use one of your own tables. All you need is an empty column. You can see here on page one we do have a table for garden tools and inventory and we need to number these and instead going into each cell and typing in a new number that increments by one, we're going to use a trick to have it automatically fill up that way. On page two of this document you can see there's a second table for hardscaping tools, so we want to differentiate these numbers, so we might want, for example, hardscaping tools, their item numbers to start with the letters HT whereas the garden tools up above might need to start with GT and then the number. Keep that in mind as we now go to the column where we want the numbers to appear. All you need to do is select the entire column. In this case we have a header column with a label in there, item number, so we're not going to use the trick of going to the top and clicking when that arrow appears, instead we're going to select the cells where the numbers need to go. With them selected, now we'll go to the ribbon. With the Home tab selected, go to the Paragraph group and just go to the Numbering dropdown arrow. Don't click the numbering button, that's going to add the default number but click the dropdown. You'll see the different numbering options that are already in the numbering library. You can hover over those to see what it's going to look like. You can see the numbers incrementing by one with a period or with brackets. We could use Roman numerals, even lettering here but if we want our own numbers, we go down a little bit further and click Define New Number. Give that a click. You should see the number style one, two, three selected. Click that dropdown and if you wanted to use something other than one, two, three, like Roman numerals or letters, they're there as well but we do want to start with just plain old numbers one, two, three. And you can see what shows up down below. The number format is the number and then a period and we see a sample of what that's going to look like down below. Well, the first thing we can do is click in that field just to the right of the period and hit your backspace key to take it out, we don't need the period. Now, we can move over to the left side of the number by using the left cursor key or you can click if you want just in front of the one and here's where we can add things like letters. GT, for example, then a dash and if that's all we need, we'll see GT-1, two, three etc. all the way down the column. Maybe you'd like to add zeros in there, like 01, 02 etc. You can do that as well. Once you have exactly what you want, simply click OK and it's done and by the way, that number format is there going forward, so the next time you want to use it, it's going to show up in your numbering library in the document as a number format and if it's one you've recently used, it shows up on this list as well, so you can choose it any time you like. Just click in the background and close that up, click outside the table to deselect everything to see how easy that was to get incremental numbers that start with letters and a dash. Now, scroll down to the table on the second page. Now that you know how to do this, you're going to create your own number style that starts with HT, a dash, perhaps a zero and then incremental numbers by following those same steps on this table. That's your homework knowing what you know after this week's Word tip.


Word templates are wonderful things. Microsoft, and hundreds of other people, have created some great free templates for almost everything. With these free templates you can make meeting agendas The 15 Best Meeting Agenda Templates for Microsoft Word The 15 Best Meeting Agenda Templates for Microsoft Word These meeting agenda templates for Microsoft Word can get you off to a great start for any type of meeting. Read More , beautiful flowcharts How to Create Stunning Flowcharts With Microsoft Word How to Create Stunning Flowcharts With Microsoft Word Used with imagination, flowcharts can simplify both your work or life. Why not try out a few flowcharts with one of the easiest tools on hand – Microsoft Word. Read More , professional resumes How to Create a Resume Template with Microsoft Word How to Create a Resume Template with Microsoft Word Your resume could be the difference between interviewing for the job of your dreams or never hearing back from the employer — use these tips to make sure it's the best it can be. Read More , and custom calendars 10+ Sites to Find the Perfect Free Printable Calendar Template All Year Long 10+ Sites to Find the Perfect Free Printable Calendar Template All Year Long You can never have enough reminders that your most valuable personal resource is limited. Our selection of printable weekly, monthly, and yearly calendars will help you manage your time wisely. Read More in minutes. A custom calendar might be a good fundraiser, too!
If you want to save all that work you just did, click the Save button. As you exit Word, the Building Blocks (the feature Quick Parts and AutoText are grouped under) are being saved in your Normal template. If you’re really up for a challenge, you could start a whole new discovery template with its own set of Building Blocks like the ones above, then distribute it to your work group so they can get the benefit of your new-found expertise.
Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.

I have a problem with Outlook 2007 and the add-in Access Outlook Add-in for Data Collection and Publishing. This add-in worked when I first installed Outlook 2007 when installing Office 2007 Enterprise. The add-in created a sub-folder in my Inbox named Data Collection Replies and worked well until about 6 weeks ago. Now I can’t get the add-in to work at all even though it appears in the list of COM.adds in Outlook 2007. More perplexing is the error message I now receive EVERY time I click on any email message to read it. The message is titled ‘Custom UI Runtime Error in...
There are a couple of ways you can set up Word 2007/2010 to use SEQ fields for numbering — you can set them up as AutoCorrect entries or as Quick Parts. Both ways work; the method you choose is up to you. This long article describes how to create the SEQ fields and the numbering style in your Normal.dotm template; how to save the SEQ fields as AutoCorrect entries in Word 2007/2010 (and how to use them); and how to save (and use) them as Quick Parts. The most consuming part of this process is settings up the fields and the style; once they’re set up, using them is super easy.
An easier way is to setup the table in Excel and use the Excel features to create sequential numbering. The cells making up the whole table can then be selected and copied into a Word document using CTRL/C and CTRL/V which will create a table in Word. Column widths and borders can be set up in Excel and cells can be filled in before copying to the Word document.
Erica Gamet has been involved in the graphics industry for an unbelievable 30 years! She is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other print- and production-related topics. She is a regular presence at CreativePro Week’s PePcon and InDesign Conferences, and has spoken at ebookcraft in Canada and Making Design in Norway. You can find Erica’s online tutorials at CreativeLive and through her YouTube channel. When she isn’t at her computer, she can be found exploring her new homebase of Seattle and the greater Pacific Northwest.
I have now permanently “baked” the Inline Counter system into my InDesign defaults. With no documents open, I made a “Counter” CharStyle and a “Zero Footnote” ParStyle, with those crucial zero-level type size attributes, and selected them in the Document Footnote Options. I also added a blank space as a prefix and a period and a blank space as a suffix. Then I made a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-F) for the Footnote/Counter. So now Inline Counters can be inserted anywhere and anytime with close to zero efforts.
To define a sequence by recursion, one needs a rule to construct each element in terms of the ones before it. In addition, enough initial elements must be provided so that all subsequent elements of the sequence can be computed by the rule. The principle of mathematical induction can be used to prove that in this case, there is exactly one sequence that satisfies both the recursion rule and the initial conditions. Induction can also be used to prove properties about a sequence, especially for sequences whose most natural description is recursive.
I’d like to build the following expression in my query GetStartWeekNumber(DatePart("ww",[EnteredDate]), Year([EnteredDate])) So if EnteredDate = 11/3/2009 the function would return 11/1/2009 But GetStartWeekNumber does not exist as an Access Built-In Function. Is there another way to do this as an expression in a query? I’m not familiar with creating my own functions. Thanks. That would depend on how you define the start of the week... One option would be to get the day-of-week number of the date (in my system/setup, Monday is day 2), then subtract one less than that...
Other notations can be useful for sequences whose pattern cannot be easily guessed, or for sequences that do not have a pattern such as the digits of π. One such notation is to write down a general formula for computing the nth term as a function of n, enclose it in parentheses, and include a subscript indicating the range of values that n can take. For example, in this notation the sequence of even numbers could be written as {\displaystyle (2n)_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The sequence of squares could be written as {\displaystyle (n^{2})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The variable n is called an index, and the set of values that it can take is called the index set.
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
Thanks for the quick reply, I think I’m a little confused by the Display aspect of this. Artifact ID is a primary key to the table I am working in and I need it to have a unique identifier that other people can search for. The previously adopted naming convention for this ID is that which I mentioned before, Collection Point ID plus a period and then a sequential number restarting at each new Collection Point ID i.e 2-1050.1, 2-1050.2, 2-1060.1 and so on. So I think I actually need to save this in the Artifact ID field. I realize this might be slightly redundant but I’m not sure how the display would work as far as searching for specific Artifact IDs in the future.
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.

Add numbers by inserting the same identifier at another location. Alternatively, copy the first one, select it and press “F9” to update the display. As a third option, you can use the keyboard shortcut “Ctrl-F9” and type “SEQ” and your identifier between the braces that appear. For instance, insert “{SEQ mynum}.” Press “F9” to update the field and enable the number to display.

Hello, can anyone help me with making serial numbers in this way: When I purchase 10 chairs, I want to monitor all of it by having serial numbers each of those 10 and those 10 numbers should have the prefix “CHR-” if they are chairs. “TBL” if tables, the codes are associated with the item category. BTW, items have categories predefined by beforehand on the items by relationships. So when I will want to monitor these 10 chairs, I will only have to click the “generate control numbers” button and each of those purchased items get their own control numbers.
Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word's numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you'll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.
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