What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in Microsoft Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. "Mike C" wrote in message news:BC4F1F10-A96C-4EC7-9E33-670828E53A0A@microsoft.com... > What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in > Microsoft > Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. Google or the online help would be your friend on this one. There's no fixed limit, there's only the limit on the overall size of the database file...

OK, First, you need to reread the blog. You should NOT be storing the Transaction_ID. It is a calculated value. Second, your naming is what confused me. Your Passenger table should have an autonumber PassengerID. That PassengerID should be the Foreign Key in your Reservations table. Your servation table should also have an autonumber for ReservationID. I really don’t see why you need sequential numbering in the passenger table. I can understand it in the Reservations table, but not in the passenger table. Also, I don’t see any reason for a transaction date in the passenger table. I can understand a CreateDate for when the passenger signed up.
But we won’t be stopping at just using a field code to increment the numbers. I’m also going to show you how to save the text (“Interrogatory No.” etc.) that precedes each number as an AutoText entry. That means you’ll be able to type just four letters and hit the Enter key (those are the “5 keystrokes” promised above) and Word will finish the phrase for you, complete with the sequence code to increment the discovery request number for you.
I tossed back a rather glib answer about using the AutoNumLgl field code to number the discovery requests, and she threw in this little wrinkle: her attorneys like to play mix-and-match with their discovery. In other words, they may put in a couple of interrogatories, then throw in a related request for production, then another interrogatory, then a request for admission that’s related to that interrogatory.
If you are thinking of using sequential numbering, please give our printing experts a call for helpful advice on how to best set up your artwork. We offer ready to use templates for the most common types of forms including invoice templates, statement templates, work order templates and purchase order templates. Just upload your logo and contact information and let us know how you would like to number your forms.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
Yes, I’m a little confused by your brief too. The script that I describe here will create an array of numbers using any step value that it offers, including by 1 number each time. Whether you put the resulting list directly into InDesign as text, or indirectly using the Data Merge feature is up to you. Perhaps learn more about the Data Merge feature of InDesign itself – David Blatner has a great series on Lynda.com that will explain Data Merge much more than I can on this thread.
The blog is pretty much step by step. Where it may not be that specific is, because, these are decisions the developer needs to make. For example, where to put the DMax expression is a matter of your workflow so I can’t tell you where to put it. I’ve given tips in the blog to help you decide. If you are having issues, then please give me more info about your application and I can suggest things.
Design your ticket, use excel or libre's version and create the numbers. Save those numbers as text, I always make the first one xxx then 001 and so on, xxx will be the master page. Use data merge from Indesign to create the master ticket, you will need to make a text box for the number. Once it looks good to you draw a text box around the whole ticket. At the bottom of the data merge tab is a button that gives you the options how you want your layout, columns or rows, etc. even has a preview. once you click create it will create another file with all your tickets sequentially numbered. It'll be a couple of hours before I'm at work but can post the link I used to create these for the first couple of times.
All of this happens in the Bullets & Numbering dialog box, shown below. You will definitely want to use paragraph styles for this. My first one is called Chapter title. You will need to begin by changing the List Type to Numbers for all of the levels, and you must both name the List and use the same named list for all Levels. You do this by selecting the List > New List.
Basically, the only difference is that we now maintain a VBA.Collection, and this time we do make use of the UniqueKeyVariant parameter, using it as a key to locate the previously assigned number. If we don’t find it, we add to the VBA.Collection. The SQL to use those 2 functions remains identical. The downside is that if the query generates millions worth of rows, the memory may run out due to a large VBA.Collection. However, if a form is bound to that large dataset, it will likely have several other problems anyway so VBA.Collection should not be a problem for forms that loads a few hundred rows. The other downside is that VBA.Collection will persist indefinitely even long after the query has “finished.” Back to form example, you might need to remember to call the ResetRowNumber() function on a form’s close to ensure that you dispose of the VBA.Collection and free up the memory.
Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.
Scott, trying my best to have sequential numbering almost identical to your scenario 1 (bound control on input form which increments last number by 1). Where do I enter this code? I have a form which opens and is ready for entry of new Project Designs. I want to show in the control box the next Project ID (a number) so do I place the code, Me.txtProject ID = Nz(DMax(“[Project ID]”,”DESIGN PROJECTS”),0)+1, under On Load, After Update, or where? And also, the Me.Dirty = False or DoCmd.RunCommand
I’d like to build the following expression in my query GetStartWeekNumber(DatePart("ww",[EnteredDate]), Year([EnteredDate])) So if EnteredDate = 11/3/2009 the function would return 11/1/2009 But GetStartWeekNumber does not exist as an Access Built-In Function. Is there another way to do this as an expression in a query? I’m not familiar with creating my own functions. Thanks. That would depend on how you define the start of the week... One option would be to get the day-of-week number of the date (in my system/setup, Monday is day 2), then subtract one less than that...
Note this works only because we create a brand new table, add an autonumber column to it as well any other columns we need then insert records into it. It’ll be contiguous – as long we don’t delete any records from the table. Unfortunately, creating a brand new table every time we run this will result in bloat of the Access file – if you can do it in a separate Access file, all the better so that you can compact it when you need to.
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