Hi, is there any limit on the number of E-Mails ? I created an archive of 270000 E-Mails (IMAP) and it caused trouble. Can I have that amount in a local folder ? Are there any recommended number ? It locked that 50000 starts being a problem on IMAP already. How else would you handle an archive that you need frequently ? Thanks for your help Stephan If it were me... exporting them(selectively) to user created properly named Windows Explorer blank folders on the hard drive and backing up to a different drive(internal/external/cd/dvd) outside of Windows Live Mail woul...
As I indicated, because you want to only generate this number just before saving, I would put this code behind a Save button or another event that runs just before you save the record. So if you want to prevent duplications, you don’t use the expression as a control source, but put the code behind a button or event. Since you have a Save button, put it there.
Other notations can be useful for sequences whose pattern cannot be easily guessed, or for sequences that do not have a pattern such as the digits of π. One such notation is to write down a general formula for computing the nth term as a function of n, enclose it in parentheses, and include a subscript indicating the range of values that n can take. For example, in this notation the sequence of even numbers could be written as {\displaystyle (2n)_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The sequence of squares could be written as {\displaystyle (n^{2})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The variable n is called an index, and the set of values that it can take is called the index set.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.
Perhaps your explanation already addresses this, but I can’t see it. Is there any way this script can be used for printing multiple-up in numeric sequence? For example, if I’m running 1000 postcards 4-up (on 250 sheets). I need the 4 cards on page 1 to be numbered 1, 251, 501, 751; then the 4 cards on page 2 numbered 2, 252, 502, 752; etc., so that when the sheets come out of the printer and are cut into 4, I have a stack of 1-250, a stack of 251-500, a stack of 501-750 and a stack of 751-1000.
A series is, informally speaking, the sum of the terms of a sequence. That is, it is an expression of the form {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} or {\displaystyle a_{1}+a_{2}+\cdots } , where {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of real or complex numbers. The partial sums of a series are the expressions resulting from replacing the infinity symbol with a finite number, i.e. the Nth partial sum of the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} is the number
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
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