I removed the required setting on the table level. The form does not give me an error message now, but does not close on its on. I closed it via a command then looked at the Design Projects table to see if the new record, #896, shows up. A new record is there, with all the entered data EXCEPT the very important field of the Project ID. That field is blank.
Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word's numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you'll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.

Hi Jason! Hard to say when I’m not sure which part isn’t working for you. If the numbering isn’t continuing across separate frames, you need to make sure you’re using a list. If they are in the wrong order, remember it uses the paste/creation order to number them. If neither of those fix it, let me know what specific issue you’re having. Good luck!
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).
Automata or finite state machines can typically be thought of as directed graphs, with edges labeled using some specific alphabet, Σ. Most familiar types of automata transition from state to state by reading input letters from Σ, following edges with matching labels; the ordered input for such an automaton forms a sequence called a word (or input word). The sequence of states encountered by the automaton when processing a word is called a run. A nondeterministic automaton may have unlabeled or duplicate out-edges for any state, giving more than one successor for some input letter. This is typically thought of as producing multiple possible runs for a given word, each being a sequence of single states, rather than producing a single run that is a sequence of sets of states; however, 'run' is occasionally used to mean the latter.
Modern businesses today require their products to carry unique numbers printed on them for identification purposes. This is where sequential numbering is important. It involves printing of numbers in an ordered or sequential form on to the products or documents. Sequential number printing can be done either in ascending or descending order on a variety of paper types. They can be either be alphanumerical combination or completely numerical. The numbers can be printed anywhere on the media and the sequencing can start from any number the client prefers.

Let’s look at why we have this setup. It seems strange to put a ResetRowNumber() call in a WHERE clause, doesn’t it? However, the WHERE clause is actually resolved prior to the SELECT clause. (For those who wants to geek out on SQL internals, Itzik Ben-Gan, a SQL Server MVP has a great post that outlines the logical query processing. Though this is specific to SQL Server, the Access database engine as well the majority of RBMS engines generally follow the same outline). This gives us a convenient point to ensure that the module level variable lngRowNumber is always correctly reset at the right time (e.g. before we start returning records from a query).
How do I set up the basic template for text numbering in Word 2008 for the Mac? Here is what is driving me nuts: I want to generate numbered lists - lots and lots of them. The first level numbered lines will have second level under them in many cases, also numbered and indented below the first level. The second level will also have third level under them, intended some more and also numbered. This "sort-of" works fine. It USED to work excellently. Here is what I do. I click the Numbering button in the Bullets and Numbering palette. The line indents and a 1) is aut...
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
In mathematics, a sequence is an enumerated collection of objects in which repetitions are allowed. Like a set, it contains members (also called elements, or terms). The number of elements (possibly infinite) is called the length of the sequence. Unlike a set, the same elements can appear multiple times at different positions in a sequence, and order matters. Formally, a sequence can be defined as a function whose domain is either the set of the natural numbers (for infinite sequences) or the set of the first n natural numbers (for a sequence of finite length n). The position of an element in a sequence is its rank or index; it is the natural number from which the element is the image. It depends on the context or a specific convention, if the first element has index 0 or 1. When a symbol has been chosen for denoting a sequence, the nth element of the sequence is denoted by this symbol with n as subscript; for example, the nth element of the Fibonacci sequence is generally denoted Fn.
WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
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