If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
One option, of course, is to print the individual copies of the document, making the edits to the copy number between each print. This gets tedious, real fast. You may also want to utilize a sequential numbering field (as discussed in other WordTips) and make the number of copies equal to what you need to print. Thus, if you have to print 25 copies, you could simply copy the entire document (including the sequential numbering field), move to the end of the document, and paste it in another 24 times. This makes for a rather large overall document, however, and there are easier ways to approach the problem.
If you work in a business where you need to sequentially number items, you might be wondering if there is a way you can use Word to create the labels for you. Word has many ways you can implement some type of numbering in your documents. For instance, you can use different fields for numbering, or use numbered lists, the captioning feature, or you can use mail merging. While all of these features (and more) use some type of numbering in them, they are not all well suited to creating labels.
I am having trouble with this procedure. My situation is almost identical to example #2. I want to populate RecordNumber on my form with a date number like “130001, 130002, etc.” where “13” is the year based on a date automatically generated in the OpenDate field in tblLogRecords. OpenDate is a date/time type field that has a default value of the date the record is created and is not editable. I have added a field called Sequence to tblLogRecords and it is a Number, Long Integer type. I also created a bound control for Sequence on my form. I have a completely separate autonumber field as the PK.

As you can see, the sequence name can be most anything (e.g. mySeq, A, B, or Bob's_your_uncle). If you start a sequence with a new sequence name the numbering restarts with 1. Look at Mary's first chore in the right hand column. Here you see the reset switch \r1 was used. This switch directs Word to restart the sequence named "A" with "1" at this point.

There are many types of machines printers used to number Carbonless forms. One style is a letter press, another is a pneumatic numbering head which uses air pressure do drive a numbering head and crash imprint the number on the top sheet transferring the number to the other sheets. For example, if you were numbering a 2 part carbonless form you would have a black or red number on the top sheet and a crashed number on the second sheet. The image on the second sheet would appear black no matter what ink was on the top sheet as the carbonless paper transfers the image in black.
Moreover, the subscripts and superscripts could have been left off in the third, fourth, and fifth notations, if the indexing set was understood to be the natural numbers. Note that in the second and third bullets, there is a well-defined sequence {\displaystyle (a_{k})_{k=1}^{\infty }} , but it is not the same as the sequence denoted by the expression.
In a legal document, it's rare for every paragraph in the document to be numbered. Usually, you change between numbered paragraphs and non-numbered (plain) paragraphs of text. When Word sees you switching between these types of formats, it usually tries to help by restarting your numbered list back at "1" (or the first value of your list, such as "A"). There are a few different ways to make the number follow the last number of your paragraphs. In Word, this is called Continue from Previous List.
It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.
I need a way for the priority level to automatically adjust when I add or change an item with a new priority level. I might have 6 tasks, each will have a different priority. If I add one and set it to 1, the others need to increment + by one digit. Adding one to the above the highest would see no change in the others. Adding one in the middle would spread the rest apart (e.g. I have a 3, I put a new record and put it at 3, the old 3 becomes 4, and so on (everything below it would increment one digit).

For example, in our law practice, we submit briefs with hundreds of attachments. Those attachments are constantly being reorganized (thus renumbered) and we had to develop a scheme to keep each attachment (and reference to each attachment) organized and accurate. We created a master list of attachments, and captured the dynamic field code in a bookmark. We can then cross-reference to that bookmark (which will return a number) through our documents. Example Public Attachment 68 (where 68 represents a field sequence code, is captured in a bookmark we will call SR_112). The bookmark name is a code name supplied by the drafting lawyer. That way, when the lawyer refers throughout the document to Public Attachment ___, we insert a cross reference to bookmark SR_112, and it always returns an accurate number, even if we reorganize the order of our attachments.


This will work OK for a small set of data, but the more data there is, the more intensive the subquery becomes, and it must be called repeatedly for each row. This is one of those rare cases where doing it in VBA is faster than doing it in SQL — after all, row numbering is fundamentally iterative, not set-based which just goes against the grain of what SQL was designed to do – solve a problem in a set-based fashion, non-iterative fashion.
I am attempting to write a query joining two linked tables in a query by payroll number (all numeric). When write the query and join by payroll number I get the "Data Type Mismatch in Expression" error. Both tables have the Data Type as "Number", but the only difference I can tell is one has "Field Size" as "Decimal" and the other has "Field Size" as "Double". I have even tried to join on the VAL() of each payroll number field with no luck. Any ideas? "Decimal" and "Double" are actually different dat...
Basically, the only difference is that we now maintain a VBA.Collection, and this time we do make use of the UniqueKeyVariant parameter, using it as a key to locate the previously assigned number. If we don’t find it, we add to the VBA.Collection. The SQL to use those 2 functions remains identical. The downside is that if the query generates millions worth of rows, the memory may run out due to a large VBA.Collection. However, if a form is bound to that large dataset, it will likely have several other problems anyway so VBA.Collection should not be a problem for forms that loads a few hundred rows. The other downside is that VBA.Collection will persist indefinitely even long after the query has “finished.” Back to form example, you might need to remember to call the ResetRowNumber() function on a form’s close to ensure that you dispose of the VBA.Collection and free up the memory.
One other thought. It may not hurt to make option 1 a logical expresssion where it will update the number IF a number other than 0 already exists for it. This will prevent it from giving a new number if you go back, edit it and save it. I accomplished this by adding the following (roughly): If PONo=0 Then My.PONo…. (Expression and save command) Else (Save Command)

Yes, I have used this system in a multi-user setting. As noted, the key is to commit the record immediately after generating the sequence. However, if the application is one where there is very heavy transaction processing. In other words dozens of users creating records simultaneously, you might want to guard further against duplication. At the speeds computers process, it is not impossible that multiple users will grab the max value before it can be incremented and saved.
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Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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