One option, of course, is to print the individual copies of the document, making the edits to the copy number between each print. This gets tedious, real fast. You may also want to utilize a sequential numbering field (as discussed in other WordTips) and make the number of copies equal to what you need to print. Thus, if you have to print 25 copies, you could simply copy the entire document (including the sequential numbering field), move to the end of the document, and paste it in another 24 times. This makes for a rather large overall document, however, and there are easier ways to approach the problem.
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Step 2: Create a new doc for your numbers. Using Paragraph/Bullets and Numbering choose Numbering and set the Format to the 4 digits you've indicated in your sample. In the box below Format, remove the ".^t". This will remove the period & tab after the style. With that style set, hit return to create a number. Repeat for as many numbers of coupons you'll have. You can create 10 and copy & paste for however many numbers you need. You could possibly create your numbers in Xcel, but I'm instructing in ID only.
Hi, As a new user to excel I am thinking of setting up a data base of my music. The total number of tracks is in excess of 70,000. I have seen a simple solution using excel which would be ok but I'm not sure if I can have 70,000 rows in one work sheet. A friend has suggested access which I am not familiar with and don't know if this will allow 70,000 entries. Can anyone please tell me what the maximum numbers are in both access and excel 2003. Cheers Glinty Max in Excel 2003 is 65536 (in one sheet) whereas Access only limit is your memory -- Regards, Peo Sjoblom ...
Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.
If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.

The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.

I tossed back a rather glib answer about using the AutoNumLgl field code to number the discovery requests, and she threw in this little wrinkle: her attorneys like to play mix-and-match with their discovery. In other words, they may put in a couple of interrogatories, then throw in a related request for production, then another interrogatory, then a request for admission that’s related to that interrogatory.

The second thing you need to do is make sure that Word is configured so that it updates fields when it prints. Now, when you run the macro, you are asked how many copies to print and what starting number to use. The document variable is updated and a single copy of the document is printed. These steps are repeated for the number of times that you chose to print.

I am attempting to write a query joining two linked tables in a query by payroll number (all numeric). When write the query and join by payroll number I get the "Data Type Mismatch in Expression" error. Both tables have the Data Type as "Number", but the only difference I can tell is one has "Field Size" as "Decimal" and the other has "Field Size" as "Double". I have even tried to join on the VAL() of each payroll number field with no luck. Any ideas? "Decimal" and "Double" are actually different dat...
Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.

Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.
Here, you’ll be given the chance to name your AutoText entry. Name it carefully — for AutoText to work correctly, the first four letters of each of your AutoText entry names will need to be distinct, since these first four letters will be the prompt for Word to offer to complete the phrase for you. My suggestion is to use Interrogatories, Production and Admission as your names, but use whatever is convenient and memorable for you.

You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word's numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you'll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.
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