I have been generating 150-400 page reports with multiple lists in tables. Word's auto numbering would only go so far in applying sequential numbering but then it just stops and I could not use it any more. I had to manually type in the numbered list which was quite annoying and very time consuming. Then I came across your Word Tip. Awesome! It worked. Thanks so very much.

A sequence is said to be monotonically increasing, if each term is greater than or equal to the one before it. For example, the sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n=1}^{\infty }}  is monotonically increasing if and only if an+1 {\displaystyle \geq }  an for all n ∈ N. If each consecutive term is strictly greater than (>) the previous term then the sequence is called strictly monotonically increasing. A sequence is monotonically decreasing, if each consecutive term is less than or equal to the previous one, and strictly monotonically decreasing, if each is strictly less than the previous. If a sequence is either increasing or decreasing it is called a monotone sequence. This is a special case of the more general notion of a monotonic function.

* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
OK, First, you need to reread the blog. You should NOT be storing the Transaction_ID. It is a calculated value. Second, your naming is what confused me. Your Passenger table should have an autonumber PassengerID. That PassengerID should be the Foreign Key in your Reservations table. Your servation table should also have an autonumber for ReservationID. I really don’t see why you need sequential numbering in the passenger table. I can understand it in the Reservations table, but not in the passenger table. Also, I don’t see any reason for a transaction date in the passenger table. I can understand a CreateDate for when the passenger signed up.
Hello, When I enter 100, it display 1, When I enter 1000, it display 10, ChefChaudart, Is that bad ?  That is one of those things that everyone runs into you change the option and it doesn't seem to do anything so you leave it changed. If you enter a decimal point everything is normal i.e. 1000. or 1000.50 but if you fail to enter a decimal point your option in Tools, Options, Edit (tab), [x] fixed decimals 2 will be used. Remove the checkmark and you'll be fine. You can try that on your boss at April Fool's time as long as their not doing your sal...

One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.

Our purchasing agent would like to be able to have the customers PO# from the Sales Transaction Entry screen show up on the PO's. Is this doable in Report Writer or can it not be done? We are using GP v9.0. As I still consider myself a newbie with RW, I would appreciate detailed instructions if possible. Thank you in advance for all responses. It is not possible thru traditional table relationships in Report Writer. Let me explain: you can certainly link the Purchase Order Work table to the SOP_POLink table and the SOP_POLink table to the SOP Transactions Work table, but will...
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.
Even worse (I found out from bitter experience), is that whenever a computer “glitch” (aka “crash”) or “upgrade” (e.g. to a new/different desktop) came along, and our outside IT vendor had to “fix” the “computer” or “system,” (always, of course, at unexpected and unpredictable times), all of my “Auto Text” blocks got “wiped out” (or, I could not find them, even after a few help desk calls), and I had to “reinvent” and “re-keystroke” or “re-save” each of them again (and several times, again). Obviously, frustrating, and largely defeating the efficiency purpose.
Other notations can be useful for sequences whose pattern cannot be easily guessed, or for sequences that do not have a pattern such as the digits of π. One such notation is to write down a general formula for computing the nth term as a function of n, enclose it in parentheses, and include a subscript indicating the range of values that n can take. For example, in this notation the sequence of even numbers could be written as {\displaystyle (2n)_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The sequence of squares could be written as {\displaystyle (n^{2})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The variable n is called an index, and the set of values that it can take is called the index set.
If you want to save all that work you just did, click the Save button. As you exit Word, the Building Blocks (the feature Quick Parts and AutoText are grouped under) are being saved in your Normal template. If you’re really up for a challenge, you could start a whole new discovery template with its own set of Building Blocks like the ones above, then distribute it to your work group so they can get the benefit of your new-found expertise.
You won’t use any of the standard List Number styles for SEQ field numbering. You need to create your own style if you want correct indentation and alignment with the tab position of the first word after the number. In this example, I’ll create a new style called Step Number, but you can call it whatever you want. In this example, I’ve also used the default settings for tab and hanging indent positions — you can change these later if you want.
To define a sequence by recursion, one needs a rule to construct each element in terms of the ones before it. In addition, enough initial elements must be provided so that all subsequent elements of the sequence can be computed by the rule. The principle of mathematical induction can be used to prove that in this case, there is exactly one sequence that satisfies both the recursion rule and the initial conditions. Induction can also be used to prove properties about a sequence, especially for sequences whose most natural description is recursive.

If you are thinking of using sequential numbering, please give our printing experts a call for helpful advice on how to best set up your artwork. We offer ready to use templates for the most common types of forms including invoice templates, statement templates, work order templates and purchase order templates. Just upload your logo and contact information and let us know how you would like to number your forms.
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