Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.
I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.

You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.
There is only one prerequisite to using the macro: you need to make sure that your document contains a bookmark named Serial. This bookmark should reference the serial number in your document, as you want it to appear in the first printed document. (When you are through running the macro, you can save the document and the serial number will be ready for the next time you want to use it.)

Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
There is only one prerequisite to using the macro: you need to make sure that your document contains a bookmark named Serial. This bookmark should reference the serial number in your document, as you want it to appear in the first printed document. (When you are through running the macro, you can save the document and the serial number will be ready for the next time you want to use it.)
Both the Collection Point ID and Artifact ID fields are bound properly and display those exact names in the property sheet under both control source and name. On the save button I have on the form, when I click on the event tab and the on click option I have event procedure and I click the […] option to open up the code builder and this is what I currently have:
There are many types of machines printers used to number Carbonless forms. One style is a letter press, another is a pneumatic numbering head which uses air pressure do drive a numbering head and crash imprint the number on the top sheet transferring the number to the other sheets. For example, if you were numbering a 2 part carbonless form you would have a black or red number on the top sheet and a crashed number on the second sheet. The image on the second sheet would appear black no matter what ink was on the top sheet as the carbonless paper transfers the image in black.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.
Creating a sequential list of numbers, in Word, sounds like an intimidating task. Sure, you can create a numbered list quickly enough, but that feature works with additional text - you're numbering something. If you want a list of just numbers, you have to work a bit harder. Word's SEQ field might come to mind, but that solution is better suited to template-type numbering. In order words, this field works great if you're numbering documents, labels, and so on. It doesn't work so well if you just want to create a list of sequential numbers. You can use it that way, but it'll be more work than it's worth.
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