I make the design with as many up as I need on the master page, linking the frames where the numbers will go. Then I make the list using Excel, copy paste to ID and apply a paragraph style with "start in next frame" option. Click the outbox on the pasted text to get a loaded cursor and delete the frame. Then just shift-click over the first textframe on a live page to have as many "tickets" added as needed automatically.
I have Office 2003 installed to Windows 2003 terminal servers but I have a problem with on of our users and excel. The issue is that when the user is trying to have multiple spreadsheets opened he keeps getting the message "This operations has been cancelled due to system restrictions- Contact your system Administrator" I can find no setting in excel to enforce a limit on the number of speadsheets a user can have open. Thanks in advance fo any advise Michael Not an expert in these matters, but; Is it possible that the user is trying to initiate another session of Excel vs....
For example, in our law practice, we submit briefs with hundreds of attachments. Those attachments are constantly being reorganized (thus renumbered) and we had to develop a scheme to keep each attachment (and reference to each attachment) organized and accurate. We created a master list of attachments, and captured the dynamic field code in a bookmark. We can then cross-reference to that bookmark (which will return a number) through our documents. Example Public Attachment 68 (where 68 represents a field sequence code, is captured in a bookmark we will call SR_112). The bookmark name is a code name supplied by the drafting lawyer. That way, when the lawyer refers throughout the document to Public Attachment ___, we insert a cross reference to bookmark SR_112, and it always returns an accurate number, even if we reorganize the order of our attachments.
An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
Step 2: Create a new doc for your numbers. Using Paragraph/Bullets and Numbering choose Numbering and set the Format to the 4 digits you've indicated in your sample. In the box below Format, remove the ".^t". This will remove the period & tab after the style. With that style set, hit return to create a number. Repeat for as many numbers of coupons you'll have. You can create 10 and copy & paste for however many numbers you need. You could possibly create your numbers in Xcel, but I'm instructing in ID only.

There are a couple of ways you can set up Word 2007/2010 to use SEQ fields for numbering — you can set them up as AutoCorrect entries or as Quick Parts. Both ways work; the method you choose is up to you. This long article describes how to create the SEQ fields and the numbering style in your Normal.dotm template; how to save the SEQ fields as AutoCorrect entries in Word 2007/2010 (and how to use them); and how to save (and use) them as Quick Parts. The most consuming part of this process is settings up the fields and the style; once they’re set up, using them is super easy.


I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Starting an auto-numbered paragraph is deceptively simple. See those buttons on the top row of the Paragraph section of the Home tab? The left-most one is for bullets; the next two to its right are for numbering and multi-level numbering, respectively. Simply click the button to toggle the feature on, or click on the drop-down arrow on each button to select a specific style. If you don’t like any of the delivered choices, you can click Define New to set your own.
Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.
Storage/saving (by default) (I understand) was to “normal.dot” somewhere on “my” C:/drive. (I.e. Nobody else in the office could “get” to the effort. So, I (as attorney), and each secretary, lawyer, and paralegal, had to work in their own “silo” and “reinvent” any such Auto Text blocks). [I.e. Query – Is there any way to save a consistent set of such Auto Text blocks for MS Word to a shared “network” drive, or similar, in a law office?).
I'm producing gift certificates for a restaurant and they need to be numbered sequentially from 0001 to 0250. Is there any way to do this easily as opposed to numbering each manually? I'm sure I could probably work it out with a print shop, but the job was thrust on me last minute and my options are limited by the short turn around time. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!...
With the numbered paragraphs shown above, there is no extra spacing between the paragraphs. That’s easy to fix. Go ahead and type out at least part of your first numbered paragraph, then go to the Page Layout tab and adjust the value of Spacing After in the Paragraph section. Still no extra space? There’s one more setting to check. Click the launcher arrow in the lower right-hand corner to go to the Paragraph dialog box, uncheck the box next to “Don’t add space between paragraphs of the same style.” Click OK. That paragraph and all the remaining numbered ones will have more breathing room.

 I'm looking for a script for Laserfiche Forms that will query a database and pull the next number in sequence and display it as the unique identifier for this document.  Once this number has been used, the number should not be used again.  This is similar to what the Submission ID is, but from what I can gather, this number is assigned after the submission takes place.  


It will ask for the number of copies that you want to make and sequentially number each copy.The first time this macro runs, the first copy will be numbered 1 and when it finishes running, it will store in aSettings.Txt file the number that is one more that the number on the last copy.The next time the macro is run, it will start numbering the copies from that number. If when you first start, you want the numbers to start at some number other than 1, run the macro, entering 1 as the number of copies and then open Settings.Txt file and replace the number in the file with the number that you want as the first in the series.At any time thereafter, if you want the series to start at a particular number, you can open that file and replace the number in it with the number that you want to be the first in the series.

The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
The partial sums themselves form a sequence {\displaystyle (S_{N})_{N\in \mathbb {N} }} , which is called the sequence of partial sums of the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} . If the sequence of partial sums converges, then we say that the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} is convergent, and the limit {\displaystyle \lim _{N\to \infty }S_{N}} is called the value of the series. The same notation is used to denote a series and its value, i.e. we write {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}=\lim _{N\to \infty }S_{N}} .
Although sequences are a type of function, they are usually distinguished notationally from functions in that the input is written as a subscript rather than in parentheses, i.e. an rather than f(n). There are terminological differences as well: the value of a sequence at the input 1 is called the "first element" of the sequence, the value at 2 is called the "second element", etc. Also, while a function abstracted from its input is usually denoted by a single letter, e.g. f, a sequence abstracted from its input is usually written by a notation such as {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n\in A}} , or just as {\displaystyle (a_{n})} . Here A is the domain, or index set, of the sequence. sequential numbering in word
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