you'd need to use a before save macro. Something like the macro at the end - but it would run on every save, which may not be what you want. I use a macro that gets the invoice # and saves (it does several things). I added a button to the ribbon that calls a macro that runs several macros: Sub FinalizeInvoice() CreateInvoiceNumber CopyToExcel FinalCleanup ' this does the save End Sub This is an automated macro - but it will run every time the file is saved. Private WithEvents App As Word.Application Private Sub Document_Open() Set App = Word.Application… Read more »
If the sequence of real numbers (an) is such that all the terms are less than some real number M, then the sequence is said to be bounded from above. In other words, this means that there exists M such that for all n, an ≤ M. Any such M is called an upper bound. Likewise, if, for some real m, an ≥ m for all n greater than some N, then the sequence is bounded from below and any such m is called a lower bound. If a sequence is both bounded from above and bounded from below, then the sequence is said to be bounded.
How do I set up the basic template for text numbering in Word 2008 for the Mac? Here is what is driving me nuts: I want to generate numbered lists - lots and lots of them. The first level numbered lines will have second level under them in many cases, also numbered and indented below the first level. The second level will also have third level under them, intended some more and also numbered. This "sort-of" works fine. It USED to work excellently. Here is what I do. I click the Numbering button in the Bullets and Numbering palette. The line indents and a 1) is aut...
But we won’t be stopping at just using a field code to increment the numbers. I’m also going to show you how to save the text (“Interrogatory No.” etc.) that precedes each number as an AutoText entry. That means you’ll be able to type just four letters and hit the Enter key (those are the “5 keystrokes” promised above) and Word will finish the phrase for you, complete with the sequence code to increment the discovery request number for you.
It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.
One option, of course, is to print the individual copies of the document, making the edits to the copy number between each print. This gets tedious, real fast. You may also want to utilize a sequential numbering field (as discussed in other WordTips) and make the number of copies equal to what you need to print. Thus, if you have to print 25 copies, you could simply copy the entire document (including the sequential numbering field), move to the end of the document, and paste it in another 24 times. This makes for a rather large overall document, however, and there are easier ways to approach the problem.
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.
I've managed to edit one using Find and Replace with an { SEQ } field as the replacement to give sequential numbering. This started from 1 which is fine. Subsequent xml's where I've tried to use { SEQ \r n } to get numbering starting from other than 1 results in multiple occurrences of the number as defined by n. It's this way even after updating the fields.

Perhaps the easiest solution to this problem (short of using a macro) is to simply use the mail-merge capabilities of Word. You would use a simple data source that contained the numbers you want assigned to each copy. Then, place the merge field at the appropriate place in y our document, and run the merge. Each copy will contain the desired copy number. The added benefit of using this approach is that you can use additional information with your merge, as needs dictate. For instance, if each copy of the document was assigned to a particular person, you could simply add another data field to your data source that contained the name of the person to receive the copy. Then, you could print that person's name in each merged document, as well.
If you make a list of things you need to do, starting with number 1 and continuing until all your tasks are accounted for, then you’ve made a sequential list. Something that is sequential often follows a numerical or alphabetical order, but it can also describe things that aren’t numbered but still need to take place in a logical order, such as the sequential steps you follow for running a program on your computer.
Here is my problem. i have a series of 3 digit numbers that need to be cinverted to a series of 4 digit numbers using this following 722 needs to read as 5622 and in the next collum SV-7822 in the collum's to the right. what type of formula is this and how can i do it? The above is an example, i have a whole range of 3 digit numbers that need the exact. rules applied to all numbers. which is why i need a formula to do it. Help someone please!!!! I'm not completely clear on what your looking for but if 722 was in A1 in B1: = A1 + 4900 in B2: = ="SV-" & A1 + 7100...
Modern businesses today require their products to carry unique numbers printed on them for identification purposes. This is where sequential numbering is important. It involves printing of numbers in an ordered or sequential form on to the products or documents. Sequential number printing can be done either in ascending or descending order on a variety of paper types. They can be either be alphanumerical combination or completely numerical. The numbers can be printed anywhere on the media and the sequencing can start from any number the client prefers.
Search sequential numbering and thousands of other words in English Cobuild dictionary from Reverso. You can complete the definition of sequential numbering given by the English Cobuild dictionary with other English dictionaries : Wikipedia, Lexilogos, Oxford, Cambridge, Chambers Harrap, Wordreference, Collins Lexibase dictionaries, Merriam Webster ...
Basically, the only difference is that we now maintain a VBA.Collection, and this time we do make use of the UniqueKeyVariant parameter, using it as a key to locate the previously assigned number. If we don’t find it, we add to the VBA.Collection. The SQL to use those 2 functions remains identical. The downside is that if the query generates millions worth of rows, the memory may run out due to a large VBA.Collection. However, if a form is bound to that large dataset, it will likely have several other problems anyway so VBA.Collection should not be a problem for forms that loads a few hundred rows. The other downside is that VBA.Collection will persist indefinitely even long after the query has “finished.” Back to form example, you might need to remember to call the ResetRowNumber() function on a form’s close to ensure that you dispose of the VBA.Collection and free up the memory.
GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.
The Artifact ID should NOT be your PK. There is no reason for it to be and to try and use it as such will be a headache. A primary key is simply a unique identifier for a record. Many purists will tell you that users should never see the PK and in your case, I would recommend that. Use an Autonumber as you PK and you can use that as your corresponding Foreign Key in related records. To prevent duplication you can make the combination of Collection Point ID and Artifact ID a unique, multi-field index. Then display the combination as I indicated where you need to show the user a record ID. This is all explained int he blog.
This one is EASY. In InDesign, with a one-sided NCR form, cut the all elements from the first page. Go to your Master page and place. Where you are going to number the forms, draw a text box and insert a page number marker there. Format it to your liking, then insert as many pages as SETS are going to be made. When you go to print, enter 2 or 3 in the copies box, depending if it's 2-part or 3-part and under the properties button, select GROUPED or UNCOLLATED, turn off OFFSET. Violá!
I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.

Layout your ticket in InDesign, one on each page, using the Page Number function to number the tickets. If you have something like Imposer Pro (I know it doesn't work from InDesign CS3) you can, for instance, impose the pages 4up consecutive and get 4 tickets on an A4. Alternatively, make a PDF of the whole document and impose (manually, if you have to), the advantage here is that this can work as a template for other tickets, simply make a new PDF of the same size and update the PDF in the template document every time you have a new raffle ticket to do.


This tip was very helpful. Now I have been able to automatically number dozens of examples in a linguistics paper, and as I revise the paper and insert new examples between the existing examples, the numbering is automatically adjusted. Now the next step is how to use bookmarks for the references to the examples in the text of the paper. The references need to point to specific examples, and need to be automatically adjusted when the numbering of examples is adjusted. Any ideas on how to do this?

Word includes a special sequencing field that you can use to do all sorts of numbering. You can even use the SEQ field to help create broken numbered lists. (A broken numbered list is one in which the flow of the list is interrupted by paragraphs of a different format.) This approach to creating numbered lists is particularly helpful and much less prone to the problems inherent in Word's built-in list numbering. For the purposes of this tip, the format of the sequence field is as follows:
And of course, it’s not only when you add or delete counters that the numbering auto-updates, but also when you copy or move the text, as when you’re rearranging your listed points. This InDesign inline counter now works exactly like the counters in my old, beloved XyWrite word processors — except I cannot have several counters with separate numbering in the same text story. In XyWrite I could have nine, using only the codes c1, c2,…c9. But for 95% of one’s counter needs, one counter per story is quite ample — as compared to none.
Informally, a sequence has a limit if the elements of the sequence become closer and closer to some value {\displaystyle L} (called the limit of the sequence), and they become and remain arbitrarily close to {\displaystyle L} , meaning that given a real number {\displaystyle d} greater than zero, all but a finite number of the elements of the sequence have a distance from {\displaystyle L} less than {\displaystyle d} .
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Both the Collection Point ID and Artifact ID fields are bound properly and display those exact names in the property sheet under both control source and name. On the save button I have on the form, when I click on the event tab and the on click option I have event procedure and I click the […] option to open up the code builder and this is what I currently have:
No matter how light the file might be, if you need 1000 units, that means you send a 1000-page file to the printer if you use Data Merge, that is not as efficient as sending one page and 1000 numbers to insert in the print stream, but to do that you need a plugin, which is what that page Bob directed you is leading up to. I've never used the program Harbs has mentioned, but he's a pretty smart guy and if he says it works well, I'd take a look.
I answer readers' questions about Microsoft Office when I can, but there's no guarantee. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise, nor do I ask for a fee from readers. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.
Any code can read the serial number of a mother board? any example? Thanks! Crystal On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 00:07:16 +0800, "Crystal Lin" wrote: >Any code can read the serial number of a mother board? any example? Thanks! > Do all computers have "mother boards" and do all mother boards have serial numbers? > Any code can read the serial number of a mother board? any example? Thanks! You can read the Serial Number of the hard drive using DiskId32 at http://www.winsim.com/diskid32/diskid32.html . Lynn Let me guess: another mis...
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.
A sequence is said to be monotonically increasing, if each term is greater than or equal to the one before it. For example, the sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n=1}^{\infty }} is monotonically increasing if and only if an+1 {\displaystyle \geq } an for all n ∈ N. If each consecutive term is strictly greater than (>) the previous term then the sequence is called strictly monotonically increasing. A sequence is monotonically decreasing, if each consecutive term is less than or equal to the previous one, and strictly monotonically decreasing, if each is strictly less than the previous. If a sequence is either increasing or decreasing it is called a monotone sequence. This is a special case of the more general notion of a monotonic function.
You may wonder whether typing 1, 2, and 3 would be easier than using the ListNum field. Although doing that may be easier initially, the value of using the ListNum field becomes apparent when you cut and paste. When a paragraph contains multiple numbered items that you move or delete, Word automatically updates the ListNum fields. Using ListNum fields assures you of accurate numbering within a paragraph throughout the document.
Although sequences are a type of function, they are usually distinguished notationally from functions in that the input is written as a subscript rather than in parentheses, i.e. an rather than f(n). There are terminological differences as well: the value of a sequence at the input 1 is called the "first element" of the sequence, the value at 2 is called the "second element", etc. Also, while a function abstracted from its input is usually denoted by a single letter, e.g. f, a sequence abstracted from its input is usually written by a notation such as {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n\in A}} , or just as {\displaystyle (a_{n})} . Here A is the domain, or index set, of the sequence. sequential numbering in word
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