Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.
Scott, I was able to try this as I assumed that is what I needed to do. It does not work. First, the current macro for that button is a Save Record, Close Window operation. How could I keep this and also add Code? If I just add a new button to the form and under the On Click Event put the code you suggested, I get a compile error of “method or data member not found” and ” .txtPROJECT” is highlighted. The actual field is “PROJECT ID#” and it is a long integer number. Entry I have is: Private Sub Command88_Click()
Budget is our income and sometimes this is positive. I need to make this column in a query all negitive values. I am using the IIf function but it is not working. Budget: [budget_amount] IIf ([budget_amount] >=0, [budget_amount]*-1, [budget_amount]) or is there another function I could use? On Mon, 29 Oct 2007 19:18:00 -0700, Tamm Fox wrote: > Budget is our income and sometimes this is positive. I need to make this > column in a query all negitive values. > > I am using the IIf function but it is not working. > > Budget: [budget_amount] IIf ([budget_amount] &g...

This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
It's easy to enter a SEQ field manually. Begin by pressing [Ctrl]+[F9]. When Word displays the blank field, enter seq list1, as shown in Figure A. List1 is a required argument; you can use any descriptive name you like as long as it begins with an alpha character. The parentheses distinguish the numbers within the text. They're not part of the field code. Highlight the field code and press [F9] to display the field's value. As you can see in Figure B, the first field returns (1).
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
Hi All, I am trying to add the 'File" menu and "Window" menu of the Standard Toolbar to a custom toolbar but failing miserably! I think it should look something like: Sub AddMenuTitles() Application.CommandBars("MyCustomMenu").Controls.Add("File) Application.CommandBars("MyCustomMenu").Controls.Add("Window") End Sub Can anybody help please Regards Michael Sub test() AddMenuTitles True ' or false to delete End Sub Sub AddMenuTitles(bAdd As Boolean) Dim cbr As CommandBar Dim cbP As CommandBarPopup ...
By omitting the dbFailOnError parameter only for the DROP TABLE statement, we won’t get a runtime error about a table not existing but get runtime errors if we can’t create the table or insert data for some reasons. I’m also not a big fan of creating multiple saved queries that are meant to be logically grouped together – it gets quite cluttered when there are several saved queries in a navigation pane like that. Keeping it all in VBA makes it clearer that the intention is to execute those statements together.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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