I am trying to automatically print sequential numbers on individual cards on 8.5" x 11" business card stock (to create tickets) using MS Publisher and cannot figure out how to get it to do this. Does anyone know the secret? Thanks. Hi Scott (scottmarsh@excite.com), in the newsgroups you posted: || I am trying to automatically print sequential numbers on individual || cards on 8.5" x 11" business card stock (to create tickets) using MS || Publisher and cannot figure out how to get it to do this. Does || anyone know the secret? Thanks. Check out the following tutorial:...

If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
- [Instructor] In this week's Word tip I'd like to address a question I'm often asked by people working in tables here in Microsoft Word and that is is there a way to quickly have numbers automatically fill up cells in the table much like they might in Microsoft Excel when you have incremental numbers that need to appear by simple clicking and dragging the corner of a cell. Well, yes, it can be done here in the table in Microsoft Word. It's not done the same way but it is just as easy and we're going to do it with this file, LeafAndMortar Inventory 040. If you have the exercise files, open it up. Now, if you don't have the exercise files, just use one of your own tables. All you need is an empty column. You can see here on page one we do have a table for garden tools and inventory and we need to number these and instead going into each cell and typing in a new number that increments by one, we're going to use a trick to have it automatically fill up that way. On page two of this document you can see there's a second table for hardscaping tools, so we want to differentiate these numbers, so we might want, for example, hardscaping tools, their item numbers to start with the letters HT whereas the garden tools up above might need to start with GT and then the number. Keep that in mind as we now go to the column where we want the numbers to appear. All you need to do is select the entire column. In this case we have a header column with a label in there, item number, so we're not going to use the trick of going to the top and clicking when that arrow appears, instead we're going to select the cells where the numbers need to go. With them selected, now we'll go to the ribbon. With the Home tab selected, go to the Paragraph group and just go to the Numbering dropdown arrow. Don't click the numbering button, that's going to add the default number but click the dropdown. You'll see the different numbering options that are already in the numbering library. You can hover over those to see what it's going to look like. You can see the numbers incrementing by one with a period or with brackets. We could use Roman numerals, even lettering here but if we want our own numbers, we go down a little bit further and click Define New Number. Give that a click. You should see the number style one, two, three selected. Click that dropdown and if you wanted to use something other than one, two, three, like Roman numerals or letters, they're there as well but we do want to start with just plain old numbers one, two, three. And you can see what shows up down below. The number format is the number and then a period and we see a sample of what that's going to look like down below. Well, the first thing we can do is click in that field just to the right of the period and hit your backspace key to take it out, we don't need the period. Now, we can move over to the left side of the number by using the left cursor key or you can click if you want just in front of the one and here's where we can add things like letters. GT, for example, then a dash and if that's all we need, we'll see GT-1, two, three etc. all the way down the column. Maybe you'd like to add zeros in there, like 01, 02 etc. You can do that as well. Once you have exactly what you want, simply click OK and it's done and by the way, that number format is there going forward, so the next time you want to use it, it's going to show up in your numbering library in the document as a number format and if it's one you've recently used, it shows up on this list as well, so you can choose it any time you like. Just click in the background and close that up, click outside the table to deselect everything to see how easy that was to get incremental numbers that start with letters and a dash. Now, scroll down to the table on the second page. Now that you know how to do this, you're going to create your own number style that starts with HT, a dash, perhaps a zero and then incremental numbers by following those same steps on this table. That's your homework knowing what you know after this week's Word tip.
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.
Rush Flyer Printing offers sequential numbering printing services. We ensure that highest standard of quality is maintained throughout the project to ensure accuracy. We use modern technology and state-of-the-art equipment to ensure that the printing gets done with highest quality standards. We understand that most business today require fast turnaround time and hence offer same day printing solutions for various products. We can even offer same day store pick up for clients from Long Island and New Jersey.
I have been generating 150-400 page reports with multiple lists in tables. Word's auto numbering would only go so far in applying sequential numbering but then it just stops and I could not use it any more. I had to manually type in the numbered list which was quite annoying and very time consuming. Then I came across your Word Tip. Awesome! It worked. Thanks so very much.
Scott, I had posted on Microsoft and you sent me to your blog to have the numbering system (similar to APEX example) explained. I am not a programmer and I don’t understand where these codes and expressions are even suppose to go in access. When I do try to implement the little I do know I continue to get errors. I am not sure if I am putting the information in the wrong place or if I am way off. Do you know of any youtube videos that could walk me through it step by step? Or if you have the time could you help walk me through the steps.
There is only one prerequisite to using the macro: you need to make sure that your document contains a bookmark named Serial. This bookmark should reference the serial number in your document, as you want it to appear in the first printed document. (When you are through running the macro, you can save the document and the serial number will be ready for the next time you want to use it.)
One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed. sequential numbering printing
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