Starting an auto-numbered paragraph is deceptively simple. See those buttons on the top row of the Paragraph section of the Home tab? The left-most one is for bullets; the next two to its right are for numbering and multi-level numbering, respectively. Simply click the button to toggle the feature on, or click on the drop-down arrow on each button to select a specific style. If you don’t like any of the delivered choices, you can click Define New to set your own.
Angie, have tried your method; however, I encountered what I surmised was a limit on the amount of characters allowed in that “Enter formatting for number” box: for instance, I can only type as far as “Request for Productio” (excluding quotations)- additional text and codes delete and default back to the incomplete phrase “Request for Productio”. Seems to have a default of 26 characters – anything exceeding that is deleted. The phrase “Request for Admission” completes, but am unable to include anything after that phrase of 26 characters. Not sure why that is, but that’s what I run into when I attempt using the multi-list option.
In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.

Here, the field code SEQ is the winning choice. SEQ is a sequence numbering code often used for things like figures or illustrations (think “Figure 1”). What makes it an ideal choice here is the ability to name each sequence separately. In other words, we can define one numbering sequence for interrogatories, another one for requests for production, and a third one for requests for admission. Microsoft Word will be able to keep each numbering sequence separate because each will have a distinct name.
I have a file that displays the text "Page 1" in the center of the worksheet. I have not been able to find a way to stop the page number from displaying. There is no header/footer, no "background", no other special items that I could find that would force the display of this. It does not appear during the printing so it's not a "watermark". It merely displays in my view when I'm working in the worksheet. Help... Hi you're in page break preview view ... choose view / normal from the menu Cheers JulieD "whalenohana"
CK Note: Word 2007 - 2013 interface has an different automatic numbering scheme which I have been told is much less subject to corruption. Microsoft Word 2010 Bible by Herb Tyson, MVP. However numbering is still very imperfect in these later versions. I still recommend following Shauna Kelly's step-by-step instructions (see above) if setting up numbering in a template or in a document likely to be heavily edited. If you start without doing this and end up with "spaghetti numbering," fixing it will be a very large chore!

You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.

The expression: Nz(DMax(“[PONum]”,”tblPO”),0)+1 will check if a PONum already exists. If it doesn’t it returns a 1, if it does it returns the number incremented by 1. If the number exists, but is 0 it will return a 1. In my blog I advise that number should NOT be generated until the user is ready to save the record. And to immediately commit the record after generating the number. Therefore, there should be no issue about giving them a new number if they go back to it.
Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word's numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you'll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.
Joshua, I described this problem in my post #5 — the footnote settings are doc-global. I know no present solution to your problem — which is why we still need Adobe to code a counter! And we also need to be able to set up footnotes which are frame-wide, not just column-wide. And, natch, we need headings which are frame-wide, spanning multiple columns — so the ID engineers can’t retire quite yet. :-)
There are a couple of ways you can set up Word 2007/2010 to use SEQ fields for numbering — you can set them up as AutoCorrect entries or as Quick Parts. Both ways work; the method you choose is up to you. This long article describes how to create the SEQ fields and the numbering style in your Normal.dotm template; how to save the SEQ fields as AutoCorrect entries in Word 2007/2010 (and how to use them); and how to save (and use) them as Quick Parts. The most consuming part of this process is settings up the fields and the style; once they’re set up, using them is super easy.

If you prefer, you can use a macro to print out your numbered copies. For instance, the following macro asks you how many copies you want to print, along with the starting copy number to use. (This comes in real handy if you print 25 copies, and then someone asks you to print a second batch of 10, numbered 26 through 35.) The macro also stores the last copy number between sessions, so that it is used as the default when you next run the macro.


This is how I see it. A person (passenger) makes a reservation. If the person has never made a reservation before, then they are added to the passenger table, But it really makes no sense to assign a sequential number to the passenger. Otherwise, an entry, just needs to be made in the reservations table. The Reservation needs to include the specific train (number and date so there should be a table for train schedules so all you need is a foreign key), the passenger and date of travel. Here I can understand wanting a sequential number to show passengers booked in a day.
Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.
Using this script… no. While I use the data merge feature of InDesign often, I avoid the “multiple records” feature, but I typically prepare one record on one page, output the resulting file to PDF and then let the imposing software take care of the page imposition. If page imposition software is something that you don’t have, there is an alternate technique that requires preparing one record on a page, and then using the multipageimporter2.5 script to import them onto a larger sheet. Here is the link to that article: http://colecandoo.com/2011/10/28/theres-more-than-one-way-to-cut-and-stack/
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.

Ok I guess it is better for me to explain what I am doing. I am in the process of creating an Access Database that an individual has been using an Excel spreadsheet forever and a day. Well the individual has on occasion doubled up numbers, forgot numbers, etc. So on what I have learned from different Access courses and Google searches I am trying to apply my knowledge.
You will occasionally want to place an unnumbered paragraph in the middle of a sequence, but the moment you hit Enter, another paragraph number pops up. To fix this, toggle paragraph numbering off by pressing the paragraph numbering button you used for the previous paragraph. (If you use the button’s drop-down, choose None as the numbering scheme.) Unfortunately, the paragraph settings won’t revert to Normal here; it’ll usually have the paragraph indented 0.25. Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+Q to strip paragraph settings out, then revise the formatting as you wish.
Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
Moreover, the subscripts and superscripts could have been left off in the third, fourth, and fifth notations, if the indexing set was understood to be the natural numbers. Note that in the second and third bullets, there is a well-defined sequence {\displaystyle (a_{k})_{k=1}^{\infty }} , but it is not the same as the sequence denoted by the expression.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
I have a table named Artifact Catalog in which there is a field Collection Point ID and a field Artifact ID. On the form I have created the user will input the Collection Point ID, for example: 2-1050. I need to find a way to have this Collection Point ID automatically generate a corresponding Artifact ID, i.e when you click the save button the first record under Artifact ID becomes: 2-1050.1 and the second becomes 2-1050.2 and so on.
Bullets and Numbering options in InDesign aren’t just for boring lists. You can auto-number items like captions, even incorporating prefixes like figure labels. Depending on how your document is set up, there are two ways to achieve this. Both involve setting up a paragraph style that incorporates numbering from the Bullets and Numbering feature. Generally I create a temporary text frame—often on my pasteboard—and set some items to create my style, pasting the text into my actual caption frames after the fact.

I want to have textbox with 2 columns with footnotes running across the bottom of those columns in one column. ID CS3 footnotes can’t handle this. So I have added fake footnote refs in the doc. using this idea. Now the footnotes themselves I can create in another text frame and use this idea again to create them and then manually place them at the bottom of the page. The only problem however with this is the FN options carrry across the whole doc. right? So even if I create a second doc for the footnotes themselves with different options and then later paste it into the main doc it’ll get messed up right?
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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