Let’s look at why we have this setup. It seems strange to put a ResetRowNumber() call in a WHERE clause, doesn’t it? However, the WHERE clause is actually resolved prior to the SELECT clause. (For those who wants to geek out on SQL internals, Itzik Ben-Gan, a SQL Server MVP has a great post that outlines the logical query processing. Though this is specific to SQL Server, the Access database engine as well the majority of RBMS engines generally follow the same outline). This gives us a convenient point to ensure that the module level variable lngRowNumber is always correctly reset at the right time (e.g. before we start returning records from a query).
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
I have two fields that should match, but one includes special characters while the other does not. Example: Field1 00ABCD123456123 Filed2 00/ABCD/123456/123/SBZ I need to find records where these two fields don't match, either by changing the display of one of them, or a query to compare Field1 character 7-15 with Field2 characters 9-14, 16-18. Hope this makes sense. Can anyone help? Thanks! Take a look at the following from the Access Help file it might be what you're looking for... Extract a part of a text value The following table lists examples of expressions that ...
You can control whether your next paragraph number continues the current sequence or starts again at 1 within that same right-click menu. If one of your numbers gets out of sequence, simply right-click and choose Continue Numbering. If you want to force the number back to the beginning (say, you’re switching from interrogatories to requests for production), choose Set Numbering Value (which will also give you the option of continuing the previous list).
	Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.

i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
After the { SEQ € \r68}, insert just the { SEQ € } fields where you need them for the sequential numbering. If you copy and paste one of these fields, you'll probably need to select in and press F9 to update it, or you could press Ctrl-A, F9 to update all fields in the document - useful if you've added/deleted one in an existing sequence or if you're adding multiple such fields.
I used multi-level lists for this sort of thing. When defining my list, I type “Interrogatory No.” before the number field in the number format definition, link it to a list style, 2nd level I type “Request for Production No”, link it to another list style. I’ll use “Answer” with no number as another level of the list. Then I modify the linked styles so the paragraphs are formatted how I need. In the styles linked to request for production and interrogatories, I will use the style linked to “Answer” as the style for the following paragraph. In the “answer” style, I’ll use Interrogatory as the style for following paragraph.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

How do I set up the basic template for text numbering in Word 2008 for the Mac? Here is what is driving me nuts: I want to generate numbered lists - lots and lots of them. The first level numbered lines will have second level under them in many cases, also numbered and indented below the first level. The second level will also have third level under them, intended some more and also numbered. This "sort-of" works fine. It USED to work excellently. Here is what I do. I click the Numbering button in the Bullets and Numbering palette. The line indents and a 1) is aut...
In a legal document, it's rare for every paragraph in the document to be numbered. Usually, you change between numbered paragraphs and non-numbered (plain) paragraphs of text. When Word sees you switching between these types of formats, it usually tries to help by restarting your numbered list back at "1" (or the first value of your list, such as "A"). There are a few different ways to make the number follow the last number of your paragraphs. In Word, this is called Continue from Previous List.
For example, in our law practice, we submit briefs with hundreds of attachments. Those attachments are constantly being reorganized (thus renumbered) and we had to develop a scheme to keep each attachment (and reference to each attachment) organized and accurate. We created a master list of attachments, and captured the dynamic field code in a bookmark. We can then cross-reference to that bookmark (which will return a number) through our documents. Example Public Attachment 68 (where 68 represents a field sequence code, is captured in a bookmark we will call SR_112). The bookmark name is a code name supplied by the drafting lawyer. That way, when the lawyer refers throughout the document to Public Attachment ___, we insert a cross reference to bookmark SR_112, and it always returns an accurate number, even if we reorganize the order of our attachments.
I have now permanently “baked” the Inline Counter system into my InDesign defaults. With no documents open, I made a “Counter” CharStyle and a “Zero Footnote” ParStyle, with those crucial zero-level type size attributes, and selected them in the Document Footnote Options. I also added a blank space as a prefix and a period and a blank space as a suffix. Then I made a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-F) for the Footnote/Counter. So now Inline Counters can be inserted anywhere and anytime with close to zero efforts.
In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.

A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.
CK Note: Word 2007 - 2013 interface has an different automatic numbering scheme which I have been told is much less subject to corruption. Microsoft Word 2010 Bible by Herb Tyson, MVP. However numbering is still very imperfect in these later versions. I still recommend following Shauna Kelly's step-by-step instructions (see above) if setting up numbering in a template or in a document likely to be heavily edited. If you start without doing this and end up with "spaghetti numbering," fixing it will be a very large chore!
I have been researching using sequential numbers for invoices an purchase orders, but all of them seem to advance the number eithe every time the document is opened or saved. My purchase order is par of a larger file, and since I will be opening and saving the fil without necessarily writing a purchase order I need more control ove its advancement. I was wondering how I could create a button that whe pressed or selected would advance the number by 1? Also, how could make it create a unique number depending on who's creating the purchas order. For example, let's say the user is ...
There are many types of machines printers used to number Carbonless forms. One style is a letter press, another is a pneumatic numbering head which uses air pressure do drive a numbering head and crash imprint the number on the top sheet transferring the number to the other sheets. For example, if you were numbering a 2 part carbonless form you would have a black or red number on the top sheet and a crashed number on the second sheet. The image on the second sheet would appear black no matter what ink was on the top sheet as the carbonless paper transfers the image in black.

I am trying to use mailmerge to print tickets. I tried using a column of sequential numbers on a spreadsheet and inserting that as a field into the mailmerge, but oddly, it used number 8 eight times on the first page, number 16 eight times on the second page, etc. So, I tried using a sequencing field as you describe. It worked great for the first page (numbers 1-8) but when I completed the mailmerge, it repeated numbers 1-8 on each successive sheet. What do I have to do to make this work in a mailmerge?
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
I would like to number a voucher book, i have place 4 vouchers on a page, the thing is that i want each of these vouchers to start with different number, 100, 200, 300, 400, and then i want to number them 99 times. The problem is that they have to be numbered only 1 per page, so that when i have printed them all i can easily crop them and staple them right up with having to go through it all.
I haven’t tried this… But according to the Microsoft instructions about field switches (http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/insert-and-format-field-codes-HA010338798.aspx), you can add text to a field code. The text must be in single quote marks, and displays as a constant for the field. The examples on that web page show the text at the end of the field, but you could try it earlier in the field by testing putting ‘120/’ in front of where the SEQ number will go.

I have a cell which has a basic formula in (adding up from 2 other cells) This number can end up being a minus number (-167), If this happens I need to be able to make that minus number appear as a zero (0). Is this possible? please help. =IF(A1+B1<0,0,A1+B1) Alternative =MAX(0,A1+B1) Gord Dibben Excel MVP On Sat, 7 May 2005 08:28:03 -0700, "marcus1066" wrote: >I have a cell which has a basic formula in (adding up from 2 other cells) >This number can end up being a minus number (-167), If this happens I need to >be...
I'm using Column A of a spreadsheet to number some items in Column B. I've been using Excel's automatic series-filling function, where you drag down from the lower right corner of a cell. However, since some of the rows in Column B are empty, and I don't want them numbered, I have to stop numbering and manually "jump" over the blanks in Column A. Is there a way to automatically number down in Column A, while skipping over the blanks and continuing where I left off? I.e. 1 2 3 4 5 ? Thanks much. Try this in A1: =IF(B1<>"",COUNTA($B$1:B1),"...
I haven’t tried this… But according to the Microsoft instructions about field switches (http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/insert-and-format-field-codes-HA010338798.aspx), you can add text to a field code. The text must be in single quote marks, and displays as a constant for the field. The examples on that web page show the text at the end of the field, but you could try it earlier in the field by testing putting ‘120/’ in front of where the SEQ number will go.
Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.
Does anybody have a way of formatting the phone numbers in Outlook 2003 so that they appear as xxx yyy zzzz that is no dashes, no parentheses? If I am going to synch to my PDA I want the numbers as short as possible and, to me, as readable as possible. Steve No. Masking of phone numbers is hard coded and based on your default dialing location. -- Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook] "Steve E." wrote in message news:2dd601c48eb8$3ff4a1e0$a601280a@phx.gbl... > Does anybody have a way of formatting the phone numbers in > Outlook 2003 so that they appear as x...
Clicked standard Mac Office upgrade yesterday, now Entourage is disabled because of message the reads This installation of Microsoft Office X exceeds the number of installations permitted by the license agreement. User name is already using this installation of Microsoft Office X. The program will now quit. I have MS Office package with 3 product keys. I'm using my laptop now, but originally it was installed on my primary desktop Mac. What's the solution to this problem? SHould I be concerned about preserving my emails -- on Entourage, if I need to reload software? Please advise....

I am trying to create a macro for outlook 2016 appointments that would add a number sequentially each time the appointment template was opened. I need to run this under public user so as others open it will give next number. Thank you in adance here is form Sequential Number Here Outside Assignment #: Click here to enter text. Court Reporter Needed: Click here to enter text. Job Type: Click here to enter text. Referral: Click here to enter text. Assignment Date: Click here to enter a date. Contact: Click here to enter text. Time: Click here to enter text.… Read more »
I have several xml files (SMS backup files) I am editing where I want to insert sequential numbering. The number in the id field shown in bold italics below has been replaced with a unique string to allow for a find and replace to be done sequentially giving, e.g. xml a) containing id's 1 to 25, xml b) containing id's 26 to 50, xml c) containing id's 51 to 75 and so on.
Informally, a sequence has a limit if the elements of the sequence become closer and closer to some value {\displaystyle L} (called the limit of the sequence), and they become and remain arbitrarily close to {\displaystyle L} , meaning that given a real number {\displaystyle d} greater than zero, all but a finite number of the elements of the sequence have a distance from {\displaystyle L} less than {\displaystyle d} .
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.

Set up a matrix in Excel, one column for each ticket position (stack) and one row for each sheet, plus one for field names. Fill the first column down in consecutive order, then the second, starting where the first column leaves off, and so on. Afet a couple of columns are filled, you can auto fill across the rows, too, so the whole thing takes only a couple of minutes. Name the stacks and use a different field for each position on the page when you do the merge. The trick is to set up using a custom file for the total number of tickets or whatever, divided into the correct number of stacks and sheets.
The second thing you need to do is make sure that Word is configured so that it updates fields when it prints. Now, when you run the macro, you are asked how many copies to print and what starting number to use. The document variable is updated and a single copy of the document is printed. These steps are repeated for the number of times that you chose to print.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
Ok I guess it is better for me to explain what I am doing. I am in the process of creating an Access Database that an individual has been using an Excel spreadsheet forever and a day. Well the individual has on occasion doubled up numbers, forgot numbers, etc. So on what I have learned from different Access courses and Google searches I am trying to apply my knowledge.
This may be a toughie, I use Word to print out order forms for my shop, right now I use a stamp to give each one a unique number just for reference (you know the ones with the dials that updates whenever use). Anyways was wanting to somehow make a macro or something in Word that will automatically increment a order number on the form as I print them.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
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