Specifically, 8 to 10 times in my career, I have set up a robust set of MS Word “Auto Text Entries.” Some, short phrases as in this article (e.g. “Interrogatory No. __,” “Long Corporate Name of Client, Inc.,” etc.). Some large blocks of text, paragraphs, or formatting chunks (e.g. Memorandum Start (To:, From:, Date:, Subject: etc.); Caption Block for [Local] Court; Signature Block; Certificate of Service, etc.).
Hello, Here is a scenerio. A client is buying 1lb of ham. It is put on a waxed paper then wrapped into a white paper and then put into a shopping bag. The usage of shopping bag is 100% cases the usage of paper is only with certin categories of sales. Same with the waxed paper. Question: Is there a way of associating wax paper, white paper and shopping bags in a way so with every sale a piece of paper gets deducted from inventory and one bag is deducted from inventory? I would like to run a report every so often and see if I need to purchase any supplies. Kits and assembly do not work...

The best way to do this is to use a primary key. In cases where a query is complex and joins several tables, we may need to use the primary key of the table that’s on the bottom of the relationship hierarchy or possible a concatenation of multiple tables’ unique key so that the expression will be unique and thus we can identify which sequential number we have assigned.
So, as an example, I’ll start with the style linked to the interrogatory in my multi-level list, type my question, hit return and I’ve got the answer space. Return again, another interrogatory ready to go. Wanted request for production instead of interrogatory? Hit the tab key and it switches to the next list level, which is request for production. (I hope I’ve explained this well enough.)
How do I set up the basic template for text numbering in Word 2008 for the Mac? Here is what is driving me nuts: I want to generate numbered lists - lots and lots of them. The first level numbered lines will have second level under them in many cases, also numbered and indented below the first level. The second level will also have third level under them, intended some more and also numbered. This "sort-of" works fine. It USED to work excellently. Here is what I do. I click the Numbering button in the Bullets and Numbering palette. The line indents and a 1) is aut...

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Awhile back, there was an add-on for excel that had a lot more tools. It showed on the toolbar. Somehow I lost it and I would like to get it back. It had a lot of tools like for changing case and fill ins. Any help wouyld be great. Maybe ASAP Utilities. Try a 'net search for this add-in. Gord Dibben MS Excel MVP On Sun, 22 Mar 2009 20:22:43 -0400, "kmkx70a" wrote: >Awhile back, there was an add-on for excel that had a lot more tools. It >showed on the toolbar. Somehow I lost it and I would like to get it back. It >had a lot of t...
There are a number of ways to denote a sequence, some of which are more useful for specific types of sequences. One way to specify a sequence is to list the elements. For example, the first four odd numbers form the sequence (1, 3, 5, 7). This notation can be used for infinite sequences as well. For instance, the infinite sequence of positive odd integers can be written (1, 3, 5, 7, ...). Listing is most useful for infinite sequences with a pattern that can be easily discerned from the first few elements. Other ways to denote a sequence are discussed after the examples.
The best way to do this is to use a primary key. In cases where a query is complex and joins several tables, we may need to use the primary key of the table that’s on the bottom of the relationship hierarchy or possible a concatenation of multiple tables’ unique key so that the expression will be unique and thus we can identify which sequential number we have assigned.

Bullets and Numbering options in InDesign aren’t just for boring lists. You can auto-number items like captions, even incorporating prefixes like figure labels. Depending on how your document is set up, there are two ways to achieve this. Both involve setting up a paragraph style that incorporates numbering from the Bullets and Numbering feature. Generally I create a temporary text frame—often on my pasteboard—and set some items to create my style, pasting the text into my actual caption frames after the fact.
For example, in our law practice, we submit briefs with hundreds of attachments. Those attachments are constantly being reorganized (thus renumbered) and we had to develop a scheme to keep each attachment (and reference to each attachment) organized and accurate. We created a master list of attachments, and captured the dynamic field code in a bookmark. We can then cross-reference to that bookmark (which will return a number) through our documents. Example Public Attachment 68 (where 68 represents a field sequence code, is captured in a bookmark we will call SR_112). The bookmark name is a code name supplied by the drafting lawyer. That way, when the lawyer refers throughout the document to Public Attachment ___, we insert a cross reference to bookmark SR_112, and it always returns an accurate number, even if we reorganize the order of our attachments.
One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.
Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
Here, the field code SEQ is the winning choice. SEQ is a sequence numbering code often used for things like figures or illustrations (think “Figure 1”). What makes it an ideal choice here is the ability to name each sequence separately. In other words, we can define one numbering sequence for interrogatories, another one for requests for production, and a third one for requests for admission. Microsoft Word will be able to keep each numbering sequence separate because each will have a distinct name.
Before you complete the merge, preview the merge results to make sure that the tracking numbers will display as you want them to in your publications. You can preview the merge in two ways: While you are refining the layout to review the layout of the individual coupon or gift certificate, or when you are getting ready to print, to preview the arrangement of coupons or gift certificates on the printed sheet.
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
Moreover, the subscripts and superscripts could have been left off in the third, fourth, and fifth notations, if the indexing set was understood to be the natural numbers. Note that in the second and third bullets, there is a well-defined sequence {\displaystyle (a_{k})_{k=1}^{\infty }} , but it is not the same as the sequence denoted by the expression.
In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.

As I indicated, because you want to only generate this number just before saving, I would put this code behind a Save button or another event that runs just before you save the record. So if you want to prevent duplications, you don’t use the expression as a control source, but put the code behind a button or event. Since you have a Save button, put it there.

Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.
For example, (M, A, R, Y) is a sequence of letters with the letter 'M' first and 'Y' last. This sequence differs from (A, R, M, Y). Also, the sequence (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8), which contains the number 1 at two different positions, is a valid sequence. Sequences can be finite, as in these examples, or infinite, such as the sequence of all even positive integers (2, 4, 6, ...). In computing and computer science, finite sequences are sometimes called strings, words or lists, the different names commonly corresponding to different ways to represent them in computer memory; infinite sequences are called streams. The empty sequence ( ) is included in most notions of sequence, but may be excluded depending on the context.
There are a number of ways to denote a sequence, some of which are more useful for specific types of sequences. One way to specify a sequence is to list the elements. For example, the first four odd numbers form the sequence (1, 3, 5, 7). This notation can be used for infinite sequences as well. For instance, the infinite sequence of positive odd integers can be written (1, 3, 5, 7, ...). Listing is most useful for infinite sequences with a pattern that can be easily discerned from the first few elements. Other ways to denote a sequence are discussed after the examples.
If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
Clicked standard Mac Office upgrade yesterday, now Entourage is disabled because of message the reads This installation of Microsoft Office X exceeds the number of installations permitted by the license agreement. User name is already using this installation of Microsoft Office X. The program will now quit. I have MS Office package with 3 product keys. I'm using my laptop now, but originally it was installed on my primary desktop Mac. What's the solution to this problem? SHould I be concerned about preserving my emails -- on Entourage, if I need to reload software? Please advise....
Now, what’s the deal with the UniqueKeyVariant parameter for the RowNumber() function? We are not even using it all! True, but if we didn’t, Access will call RowNumber() only once for an entire query and thus we get “1” for the entire dataset. That is a good way to save on CPU processing – why call Now() for each row? In this case, we want to go against this CPU-saving measure and ensure that the RowNumber() is in fact called once per row to generate a new number for that row. Thus, we pass in a parameter — a primary key of a table is a good choice for this purpose. So we get a nice sequential number generated all in the query with VBA function.
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.
So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.
The new SQL stored procedure lookup rules in Forms 9.1 make doing something like this possible. The example in the online help shows how to use a stored procedure to auto-append an incrementing number from the database to a form when it loads, which might solve some of your problems. However, the number is incremented after the form loads (not when it is submitted), so that might not exactly fit your needs. Here's the link to the correct page of the online help.
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