That’s it! From now on, all you have to do to add SEQ field numbering is either type in your AutoCorrect text (1] and n]) or select the options from your Quick Parts list. If you find your numbering gets out of whack (remember, the numbers don’t update when you insert a new number between two existing numbers, or delete a number), select the sequence and press F9 (Hint: To update all fields for the entire document, press Ctrl+A then F9).
I’d like to use this for Exhibits/Appedices. If we refer to the same Exhibit # in a footnote or elsewhere in the document, and then the Exhibit reference is moved, it causes an error in the footnote or reference. Is there a way to cross-reference this, or to have it cross-reference automatically? Lawyers want to use this but I can’t see them bothering to cross-reference the footnotes. Thanks.
Search sequential numbering and thousands of other words in English Cobuild dictionary from Reverso. You can complete the definition of sequential numbering given by the English Cobuild dictionary with other English dictionaries : Wikipedia, Lexilogos, Oxford, Cambridge, Chambers Harrap, Wordreference, Collins Lexibase dictionaries, Merriam Webster ...

i have gone through the intersting discussions on this site. I am having a problem with foot notes in Adobe in design cs 4. when i pasted a fresh set of pages in a doc in- in design, the fn numbering starts from 1 all over again in the fresh set of pages. i am not able to insert foot notes manually, as it does not creat the space below the text. I am stuck for help
Please tell me there is a way to accomplish this.  As stated, if two users launch the initial submission form with the lookup field populated with P1234 for example, the first user to submit get the number, and the second user now has started there purchasing with a duplicated/invalid number.  Can we increment the field on submission load?  Also, the ability to instead show the purchasing number on event completion doesn't work either, too bad.
Each section within an InDesign document can be numbered differently. This allows you to use one type of numerals to consecutively number a document's preface or other introductory materials and another numeral system for the remainder of the document. You must first define your document's sections, and then you can add section markers or page markers to your master pages. Apply the master page to document pages to include the section and page numbers on the document pages.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Hi All, I am trying to add the 'File" menu and "Window" menu of the Standard Toolbar to a custom toolbar but failing miserably! I think it should look something like: Sub AddMenuTitles() Application.CommandBars("MyCustomMenu").Controls.Add("File) Application.CommandBars("MyCustomMenu").Controls.Add("Window") End Sub Can anybody help please Regards Michael Sub test() AddMenuTitles True ' or false to delete End Sub Sub AddMenuTitles(bAdd As Boolean) Dim cbr As CommandBar Dim cbP As CommandBarPopup ...
I created something like this for a demo and didn't have to use a script. If I remember correctly, I leveraged Workflow. Essentially, the form submission would trigger a very simple workflow that would look at the current counter value on a database table and increment it by 1. The next form would then start with a lookup that would grab that counter and put it into a read-only (or hidden) field. Rinse and repeat.

And of course, it’s not only when you add or delete counters that the numbering auto-updates, but also when you copy or move the text, as when you’re rearranging your listed points. This InDesign inline counter now works exactly like the counters in my old, beloved XyWrite word processors — except I cannot have several counters with separate numbering in the same text story. In XyWrite I could have nine, using only the codes c1, c2,…c9. But for 95% of one’s counter needs, one counter per story is quite ample — as compared to none.


It may be convenient to have the sequence start with an index different from 1 or 0. For example, the sequence defined by xn = 1/log(n) would be defined only for n ≥ 2. When talking about such infinite sequences, it is usually sufficient (and does not change much for most considerations) to assume that the members of the sequence are defined at least for all indices large enough, that is, greater than some given N.
When you are ready to restart numbering, you can use the technique above, or you can place your cursor inside a numbered paragraph above, click the Format Painter (the paintbrush icon on the Home tab under Clipboard), then click on the line where you want to restart numbering. Using Format Painter this way solves several paragraph numbering problems (the number sequence, indents, and inter-paragraph spacing) simultaneously.

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Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
You may wonder whether typing 1, 2, and 3 would be easier than using the ListNum field. Although doing that may be easier initially, the value of using the ListNum field becomes apparent when you cut and paste. When a paragraph contains multiple numbered items that you move or delete, Word automatically updates the ListNum fields. Using ListNum fields assures you of accurate numbering within a paragraph throughout the document.
Step 2: Create a new doc for your numbers. Using Paragraph/Bullets and Numbering choose Numbering and set the Format to the 4 digits you've indicated in your sample. In the box below Format, remove the ".^t". This will remove the period & tab after the style. With that style set, hit return to create a number. Repeat for as many numbers of coupons you'll have. You can create 10 and copy & paste for however many numbers you need. You could possibly create your numbers in Xcel, but I'm instructing in ID only.
I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.

Layout your ticket in InDesign, one on each page, using the Page Number function to number the tickets. If you have something like Imposer Pro (I know it doesn't work from InDesign CS3) you can, for instance, impose the pages 4up consecutive and get 4 tickets on an A4. Alternatively, make a PDF of the whole document and impose (manually, if you have to), the advantage here is that this can work as a template for other tickets, simply make a new PDF of the same size and update the PDF in the template document every time you have a new raffle ticket to do.
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.

I create a CStatic object and write some text to the object but the text is too long to display in the work area but I don't konw how to add a vscroll to a CStatic object who can help me? I would say instead of a CStatic, use a CEdit control with the ReadOnly flag set. Because static controls by default aren't scrollable, so even if you add a scrollbar to it, you will have to manage the entire thing yourself (drawing, scrolling....), more trouble than it's worth. Ali R. "Smallfrogs" wrote in message news:eLAO92y7DHA.2832@tk2msft...
I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
Perhaps the easiest solution to this problem (short of using a macro) is to simply use the mail-merge capabilities of Word. You would use a simple data source that contained the numbers you want assigned to each copy. Then, place the merge field at the appropriate place in y our document, and run the merge. Each copy will contain the desired copy number. The added benefit of using this approach is that you can use additional information with your merge, as needs dictate. For instance, if each copy of the document was assigned to a particular person, you could simply add another data field to your data source that contained the name of the person to receive the copy. Then, you could print that person's name in each merged document, as well.
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed. sequential numbering printing
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