If you work in a business where you need to sequentially number items, you might be wondering if there is a way you can use Word to create the labels for you. Word has many ways you can implement some type of numbering in your documents. For instance, you can use different fields for numbering, or use numbered lists, the captioning feature, or you can use mail merging. While all of these features (and more) use some type of numbering in them, they are not all well suited to creating labels.
A subsequence of a given sequence is a sequence formed from the given sequence by deleting some of the elements without disturbing the relative positions of the remaining elements. For instance, the sequence of positive even integers (2, 4, 6, ...) is a subsequence of the positive integers (1, 2, 3, ...). The positions of some elements change when other elements are deleted. However, the relative positions are preserved.
I’ve been searching for the best way to create auto numbering for discovery requests: dare I say in WordPerfect I had the most amazing macros that used “counter” and creating a set of discovery was a snap. I’ve struggled to find something workable in Word. Some people use Discovery Request No. X – Interrogatory; others use Interrogatories No. X, Requests for Production No. X, Requests for Admission No. X throughout a set of discovery. There has to be a way to do this in Word, and I’ve tried several different approaches, none of which worked out that well. Would you please steer me in the right direction? Thanks very, very much.
Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.
You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.
I used multi-level lists for this sort of thing. When defining my list, I type “Interrogatory No.” before the number field in the number format definition, link it to a list style, 2nd level I type “Request for Production No”, link it to another list style. I’ll use “Answer” with no number as another level of the list. Then I modify the linked styles so the paragraphs are formatted how I need. In the styles linked to request for production and interrogatories, I will use the style linked to “Answer” as the style for the following paragraph. In the “answer” style, I’ll use Interrogatory as the style for following paragraph.
An easier way is to setup the table in Excel and use the Excel features to create sequential numbering. The cells making up the whole table can then be selected and copied into a Word document using CTRL/C and CTRL/V which will create a table in Word. Column widths and borders can be set up in Excel and cells can be filled in before copying to the Word document. 

Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.

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I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
Hi Silver, Try going to File/Page Setup/Header-Footer/Custom Header/Should be the button shown in the header box with the # sign in it. Larry -- keithl816 ------------------------------------------------------------------------ keithl816's Profile: http://www.excelforum.com/member.php?action=getinfo&userid=21287 View this thread: http://www.excelforum.com/showthread.php?threadid=498476 ...
The process described in this tip works best if you have a single list in your document. Note that the sequence field starts at the beginning of the document and numbers through the whole document, based on the identifier you use. If you are going to have multiple lists in your document, then you can add a second AutoText entry to help with this. The only difference in the above steps is that the SEQ field you define would look like this:
Your raffle might be subject to gaming commission or tax laws. Check with your municipality, state or province, and federal governments to make sure your raffle is legal. These government departments aren’t just enforcers. They are often great resources on how to run a successful fund raising raffle. Raffles are fun! Getting in trouble with the law or tax man is not.
That’s it! From now on, all you have to do to add SEQ field numbering is either type in your AutoCorrect text (1] and n]) or select the options from your Quick Parts list. If you find your numbering gets out of whack (remember, the numbers don’t update when you insert a new number between two existing numbers, or delete a number), select the sequence and press F9 (Hint: To update all fields for the entire document, press Ctrl+A then F9).

I've managed to edit one using Find and Replace with an { SEQ } field as the replacement to give sequential numbering. This started from 1 which is fine. Subsequent xml's where I've tried to use { SEQ \r n } to get numbering starting from other than 1 results in multiple occurrences of the number as defined by n. It's this way even after updating the fields.
Or, assuming you have a standard page number field in the header or footer, you could create a macro that goes to the end of the document, prints the current page, then goes to the top of the document, inserts a hard page break and repeats another 99 times. Would leave things a bit messy though. Don't save changes! laugh
If you are thinking of using sequential numbering, please give our printing experts a call for helpful advice on how to best set up your artwork. We offer ready to use templates for the most common types of forms including invoice templates, statement templates, work order templates and purchase order templates. Just upload your logo and contact information and let us know how you would like to number your forms.
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