In mathematics, a sequence is an enumerated collection of objects in which repetitions are allowed. Like a set, it contains members (also called elements, or terms). The number of elements (possibly infinite) is called the length of the sequence. Unlike a set, the same elements can appear multiple times at different positions in a sequence, and order matters. Formally, a sequence can be defined as a function whose domain is either the set of the natural numbers (for infinite sequences) or the set of the first n natural numbers (for a sequence of finite length n). The position of an element in a sequence is its rank or index; it is the natural number from which the element is the image. It depends on the context or a specific convention, if the first element has index 0 or 1. When a symbol has been chosen for denoting a sequence, the nth element of the sequence is denoted by this symbol with n as subscript; for example, the nth element of the Fibonacci sequence is generally denoted Fn.
An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
So, if you wanted to use this idea in a form or datasheet, let me stop and first remind you – if this is going to be non-updatable, you can just embed a report as a subreport within a form and thus use Running Sum. But let’s discuss the case where you need to be able to edit data in the forms, even with sequential numbering generated for the data you are viewing. This means we need to be able to tie a sequential number to a specific row.
There are many types of machines printers used to number Carbonless forms. One style is a letter press, another is a pneumatic numbering head which uses air pressure do drive a numbering head and crash imprint the number on the top sheet transferring the number to the other sheets. For example, if you were numbering a 2 part carbonless form you would have a black or red number on the top sheet and a crashed number on the second sheet. The image on the second sheet would appear black no matter what ink was on the top sheet as the carbonless paper transfers the image in black.
Storage/saving (by default) (I understand) was to “normal.dot” somewhere on “my” C:/drive. (I.e. Nobody else in the office could “get” to the effort. So, I (as attorney), and each secretary, lawyer, and paralegal, had to work in their own “silo” and “reinvent” any such Auto Text blocks). [I.e. Query – Is there any way to save a consistent set of such Auto Text blocks for MS Word to a shared “network” drive, or similar, in a law office?).
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
Word templates are wonderful things. Microsoft, and hundreds of other people, have created some great free templates for almost everything. With these free templates you can make meeting agendas The 15 Best Meeting Agenda Templates for Microsoft Word The 15 Best Meeting Agenda Templates for Microsoft Word These meeting agenda templates for Microsoft Word can get you off to a great start for any type of meeting. Read More , beautiful flowcharts How to Create Stunning Flowcharts With Microsoft Word How to Create Stunning Flowcharts With Microsoft Word Used with imagination, flowcharts can simplify both your work or life. Why not try out a few flowcharts with one of the easiest tools on hand – Microsoft Word. Read More , professional resumes How to Create a Resume Template with Microsoft Word How to Create a Resume Template with Microsoft Word Your resume could be the difference between interviewing for the job of your dreams or never hearing back from the employer — use these tips to make sure it's the best it can be. Read More , and custom calendars 10+ Sites to Find the Perfect Free Printable Calendar Template All Year Long 10+ Sites to Find the Perfect Free Printable Calendar Template All Year Long You can never have enough reminders that your most valuable personal resource is limited. Our selection of printable weekly, monthly, and yearly calendars will help you manage your time wisely. Read More in minutes. A custom calendar might be a good fundraiser, too!

you'd need to use a before save macro. Something like the macro at the end - but it would run on every save, which may not be what you want. I use a macro that gets the invoice # and saves (it does several things). I added a button to the ribbon that calls a macro that runs several macros: Sub FinalizeInvoice() CreateInvoiceNumber CopyToExcel FinalCleanup ' this does the save End Sub This is an automated macro - but it will run every time the file is saved. Private WithEvents App As Word.Application Private Sub Document_Open() Set App = Word.Application… Read more »
Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.
If you are still reading this then perhaps you are looking for a simple and reliable way to number a couple of lists in a Word document. If you read John's article then you have already been informed that field numbering is simple and robust. If you are like 9 out of 10 Word users in my office then anything more than 1. space space Blah, blah "enter" 2. space space Blah, blah ... defies simple! If that applies to you, then the "SeqField Numbering" Add-In presented later in this page is for you.
If you want to save all that work you just did, click the Save button. As you exit Word, the Building Blocks (the feature Quick Parts and AutoText are grouped under) are being saved in your Normal template. If you’re really up for a challenge, you could start a whole new discovery template with its own set of Building Blocks like the ones above, then distribute it to your work group so they can get the benefit of your new-found expertise.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
The best way to do this is to use a primary key. In cases where a query is complex and joins several tables, we may need to use the primary key of the table that’s on the bottom of the relationship hierarchy or possible a concatenation of multiple tables’ unique key so that the expression will be unique and thus we can identify which sequential number we have assigned.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
Note this works only because we create a brand new table, add an autonumber column to it as well any other columns we need then insert records into it. It’ll be contiguous – as long we don’t delete any records from the table. Unfortunately, creating a brand new table every time we run this will result in bloat of the Access file – if you can do it in a separate Access file, all the better so that you can compact it when you need to.
I’d like to build the following expression in my query GetStartWeekNumber(DatePart("ww",[EnteredDate]), Year([EnteredDate])) So if EnteredDate = 11/3/2009 the function would return 11/1/2009 But GetStartWeekNumber does not exist as an Access Built-In Function. Is there another way to do this as an expression in a query? I’m not familiar with creating my own functions. Thanks. That would depend on how you define the start of the week... One option would be to get the day-of-week number of the date (in my system/setup, Monday is day 2), then subtract one less than that...
The new SQL stored procedure lookup rules in Forms 9.1 make doing something like this possible. The example in the online help shows how to use a stored procedure to auto-append an incrementing number from the database to a form when it loads, which might solve some of your problems. However, the number is incremented after the form loads (not when it is submitted), so that might not exactly fit your needs. Here's the link to the correct page of the online help.
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