This may be a toughie, I use Word to print out order forms for my shop, right now I use a stamp to give each one a unique number just for reference (you know the ones with the dials that updates whenever use). Anyways was wanting to somehow make a macro or something in Word that will automatically increment a order number on the form as I print them.
I haven’t tried this… But according to the Microsoft instructions about field switches (http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/insert-and-format-field-codes-HA010338798.aspx), you can add text to a field code. The text must be in single quote marks, and displays as a constant for the field. The examples on that web page show the text at the end of the field, but you could try it earlier in the field by testing putting ‘120/’ in front of where the SEQ number will go.
Hi, Let's keep the problem simple. I have one cell that uses an exchange rate from the internet. That cell changes every minute. What I want to do: In an other cell, I want to keep the highest exchange rate ever. So for example: 6:00 exchange rate = 5.00 -- highest exchange rate is 5.00 6:01 exchange rate = 4.98 -- highest exchange rate is 5.00 6:02 exchange rate = 5.02 -- highest exchange rate is 5.02 6:03 exchange rate = 5.01 -- highest exchange rate is 5.02 6:04 exchange rate = 5.03 -- highest exchange rate is 5.03 Of course nor for any minute I use a new cell, it just change the n...
If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.
Word's numbering feature is easy to use, but it doesn't work in all situations. For instance, it can't handle an inline number sequence. By inline, I mean a sequence of numbers positioned within regular text. Fortunately, the SEQ field code handles these situations. I'll start by showing you how to insert the SEQ field code manually, for those one-time occurrences. If you use this feature often, you'll want to add AutoCorrect items for quick insertion into your text. So we'll look at that, too.

I have now permanently “baked” the Inline Counter system into my InDesign defaults. With no documents open, I made a “Counter” CharStyle and a “Zero Footnote” ParStyle, with those crucial zero-level type size attributes, and selected them in the Document Footnote Options. I also added a blank space as a prefix and a period and a blank space as a suffix. Then I made a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-F) for the Footnote/Counter. So now Inline Counters can be inserted anywhere and anytime with close to zero efforts.
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Normally, the term infinite sequence refers to a sequence that is infinite in one direction, and finite in the other—the sequence has a first element, but no final element. Such a sequence is called a singly infinite sequence or a one-sided infinite sequence when disambiguation is necessary. In contrast, a sequence that is infinite in both directions—i.e. that has neither a first nor a final element—is called a bi-infinite sequence, two-way infinite sequence, or doubly infinite sequence. A function from the set Z of all integers into a set, such as for instance the sequence of all even integers ( …, −4, −2, 0, 2, 4, 6, 8… ), is bi-infinite. This sequence could be denoted {\displaystyle (2n)_{n=-\infty }^{\infty }} .
You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.
You won’t use any of the standard List Number styles for SEQ field numbering. You need to create your own style if you want correct indentation and alignment with the tab position of the first word after the number. In this example, I’ll create a new style called Step Number, but you can call it whatever you want. In this example, I’ve also used the default settings for tab and hanging indent positions — you can change these later if you want.
A variety of printing products use sequential numbering printing. Carbonless forms, invoices, receipts, business forms, contracts, purchase orders, office documents, event tickets, packaging and more all use sequential numbering.  The numbers can also be printed twice on the media if required. They can be printed in any color, but are often printed in black or red to make them stand out.
InDesign allows you to add a page number marker to a master page within the document. The master page functions as a template for every page it's applied to, so the consecutive page numbers appear on every page. InDesign updates the page number automatically as you insert, delete and move pages. To add a page number marker to a master page, create a text box on the master page by going to the Type menu and choosing "Insert Special Character," "Markers" and then "Current Page Number."
I have two fields that should match, but one includes special characters while the other does not. Example: Field1 00ABCD123456123 Filed2 00/ABCD/123456/123/SBZ I need to find records where these two fields don't match, either by changing the display of one of them, or a query to compare Field1 character 7-15 with Field2 characters 9-14, 16-18. Hope this makes sense. Can anyone help? Thanks! Take a look at the following from the Access Help file it might be what you're looking for... Extract a part of a text value The following table lists examples of expressions that ...
If you are thinking of using sequential numbering, please give our printing experts a call for helpful advice on how to best set up your artwork. We offer ready to use templates for the most common types of forms including invoice templates, statement templates, work order templates and purchase order templates. Just upload your logo and contact information and let us know how you would like to number your forms.
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