Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.

Every time I open Outlook 2007 I get an error message regarding an add-in 'DCCExtensions' (DCCEXT32.DLL). It says the add-in cannot be loaded and has been disabled by Outlook. I've been getting this message ever since I uninstalled Winfax. How do I make this error stop appearing? Thanks. -- kapibarra Remove the addin from OL by using Trust Center, Addins. http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook/HA100341271033.aspx#14 "kapibarra" wrote: > Every time I open Outlook 2007 I get an error > message regarding an add-in 'DCCExtensions' (DCCEXT32.DLL). ...
It will ask for the number of copies that you want to make and sequentially number each copy.The first time this macro runs, the first copy will be numbered 1 and when it finishes running, it will store in aSettings.Txt file the number that is one more that the number on the last copy.The next time the macro is run, it will start numbering the copies from that number. If when you first start, you want the numbers to start at some number other than 1, run the macro, entering 1 as the number of copies and then open Settings.Txt file and replace the number in the file with the number that you want as the first in the series.At any time thereafter, if you want the series to start at a particular number, you can open that file and replace the number in it with the number that you want to be the first in the series.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.

A3 is the result of A1/21 I want to bracket the number in A4 In MSWorks I would type the statement ="["&string(A3,0)&"]" In excel I get in some cells [1.436871259834] I'd like it to read [1] Help please. -- rodney@touch88gum.com.au (Remove gum to reply) Rodney, ="["&ROUND(A3,0)&"]" -- HTH, Bernie MS Excel MVP "Rodney" wrote in message news:OkME4oGVEHA.2564@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl... > A3 is the result of A1/21 > I want to bracket the number in A4 > In MSWorks I would type th...
Design your ticket, use excel or libre's version and create the numbers. Save those numbers as text, I always make the first one xxx then 001 and so on, xxx will be the master page. Use data merge from Indesign to create the master ticket, you will need to make a text box for the number. Once it looks good to you draw a text box around the whole ticket. At the bottom of the data merge tab is a button that gives you the options how you want your layout, columns or rows, etc. even has a preview. once you click create it will create another file with all your tickets sequentially numbered. It'll be a couple of hours before I'm at work but can post the link I used to create these for the first couple of times.
Other notations can be useful for sequences whose pattern cannot be easily guessed, or for sequences that do not have a pattern such as the digits of π. One such notation is to write down a general formula for computing the nth term as a function of n, enclose it in parentheses, and include a subscript indicating the range of values that n can take. For example, in this notation the sequence of even numbers could be written as {\displaystyle (2n)_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The sequence of squares could be written as {\displaystyle (n^{2})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The variable n is called an index, and the set of values that it can take is called the index set.
If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.
I also use InDesign. An Excel file for numbering is easy to create. Then find DataMerge under Automate to link the data file. When you are ready to export, use the create PDF right on the Datamerge window. You can print as cut / stack on the Fiery (or CREO). REMEMBER - if your customer wants them stapled into books of 6 (for example) each stack has to be divisible by 6 if you are going to staple then cut into individual books.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.

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While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
To define a sequence by recursion, one needs a rule to construct each element in terms of the ones before it. In addition, enough initial elements must be provided so that all subsequent elements of the sequence can be computed by the rule. The principle of mathematical induction can be used to prove that in this case, there is exactly one sequence that satisfies both the recursion rule and the initial conditions. Induction can also be used to prove properties about a sequence, especially for sequences whose most natural description is recursive.
Scott, I had posted on Microsoft and you sent me to your blog to have the numbering system (similar to APEX example) explained. I am not a programmer and I don’t understand where these codes and expressions are even suppose to go in access. When I do try to implement the little I do know I continue to get errors. I am not sure if I am putting the information in the wrong place or if I am way off. Do you know of any youtube videos that could walk me through it step by step? Or if you have the time could you help walk me through the steps.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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