Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.

I also use InDesign. An Excel file for numbering is easy to create. Then find DataMerge under Automate to link the data file. When you are ready to export, use the create PDF right on the Datamerge window. You can print as cut / stack on the Fiery (or CREO). REMEMBER - if your customer wants them stapled into books of 6 (for example) each stack has to be divisible by 6 if you are going to staple then cut into individual books.
Let’s look at why we have this setup. It seems strange to put a ResetRowNumber() call in a WHERE clause, doesn’t it? However, the WHERE clause is actually resolved prior to the SELECT clause. (For those who wants to geek out on SQL internals, Itzik Ben-Gan, a SQL Server MVP has a great post that outlines the logical query processing. Though this is specific to SQL Server, the Access database engine as well the majority of RBMS engines generally follow the same outline). This gives us a convenient point to ensure that the module level variable lngRowNumber is always correctly reset at the right time (e.g. before we start returning records from a query).
I have a file that displays the text "Page 1" in the center of the worksheet. I have not been able to find a way to stop the page number from displaying. There is no header/footer, no "background", no other special items that I could find that would force the display of this. It does not appear during the printing so it's not a "watermark". It merely displays in my view when I'm working in the worksheet. Help... Hi you're in page break preview view ... choose view / normal from the menu Cheers JulieD "whalenohana"
As you can see, an idea of sequential numbering can be solved many different ways using different domains. This is typical in this field of work and precisely why it pays to not just consider how you can do it in one domain but also whether the domain is the right domain. We saw how we can easily leverage built-in features such as Transact-SQL’s ROW_NUMBER() or Access report’s Running Sum property. We also not only saw how we can craft our custom solutions in either VBA or SQL but we also see how we can use both together to create a solution that is better.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.

In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
2. In Word 2007 & later, if you put the macro into your 'Capital_Unit_Certificate' document, you'll need to save the document in the docm format and you'll need to enable macros whenever you open the document if you want to print the certificate. Alternatively, if you add the macro to Word's 'Normal' template, the macro will always be available (to you only) an you can keep the document in it's docx format - plus you won't get macro warnings every time you open it.
Other notations can be useful for sequences whose pattern cannot be easily guessed, or for sequences that do not have a pattern such as the digits of π. One such notation is to write down a general formula for computing the nth term as a function of n, enclose it in parentheses, and include a subscript indicating the range of values that n can take. For example, in this notation the sequence of even numbers could be written as {\displaystyle (2n)_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The sequence of squares could be written as {\displaystyle (n^{2})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The variable n is called an index, and the set of values that it can take is called the index set.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
Even worse (I found out from bitter experience), is that whenever a computer “glitch” (aka “crash”) or “upgrade” (e.g. to a new/different desktop) came along, and our outside IT vendor had to “fix” the “computer” or “system,” (always, of course, at unexpected and unpredictable times), all of my “Auto Text” blocks got “wiped out” (or, I could not find them, even after a few help desk calls), and I had to “reinvent” and “re-keystroke” or “re-save” each of them again (and several times, again). Obviously, frustrating, and largely defeating the efficiency purpose.
The best way to do this is to use a primary key. In cases where a query is complex and joins several tables, we may need to use the primary key of the table that’s on the bottom of the relationship hierarchy or possible a concatenation of multiple tables’ unique key so that the expression will be unique and thus we can identify which sequential number we have assigned.
One other thought. It may not hurt to make option 1 a logical expresssion where it will update the number IF a number other than 0 already exists for it. This will prevent it from giving a new number if you go back, edit it and save it. I accomplished this by adding the following (roughly): If PONo=0 Then My.PONo…. (Expression and save command) Else (Save Command)
OK, so what didn’t you understand in my blog? The blog contains instructions on how to deal with this. It tells you that you do not want an LH Identifier field. It tells you that all you need is to add a Sequence field to store the Sequential number. It tells you how to base that number on the current year so it restarts with the new year, Finally it tells you how to combine the year and the sequence # with whatever else you need to display the LH identifier. These instructions are all detailed in the blog.

If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.

Hello, I'm looking for a way to quickly find what numbers are missing in column B. I can sort them ascending, but how do I find if there are missing numbers? 1 2 3 5 6 7 9 I need to know 4 and 8 are missing. Thank you. One way: select B2:Bx. Choose Format/Conditional Formatting... CF1: Formula is =(B2-B1)>1 Format1: / or, without sorting, select column B (with B1 active): CF1: Formula is =AND(B1>MIN(B:B),COUNTIF(B:B,B1-1)=0) Both CF's will activate if there are missing numbers before them. In article <28706E9E-2624...
It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.

For whatever reason, AllExperts did not let me post a direct reply to your response re: “Ok, what is the ControlSource of the Fixture Number control? It should be: =cboZone & “-” & Format(Me.FNumber,”000″)” and adding “Me.Refresh” to my code (within the last 10 minutes). It just had the “rate this reply”. I added the Me.Refresh and corrected my location of the =cboZone code and it works correctly now.


Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package

I'm producing gift certificates for a restaurant and they need to be numbered sequentially from 0001 to 0250. Is there any way to do this easily as opposed to numbering each manually? I'm sure I could probably work it out with a print shop, but the job was thrust on me last minute and my options are limited by the short turn around time. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!...
i have gone through the intersting discussions on this site. I am having a problem with foot notes in Adobe in design cs 4. when i pasted a fresh set of pages in a doc in- in design, the fn numbering starts from 1 all over again in the fresh set of pages. i am not able to insert foot notes manually, as it does not creat the space below the text. I am stuck for help
So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.
Add specific codes to coupons to track customer responses     Use different codes for your different marketing messages, advertisements, or promotions. These codes will enable you to keep track of how customers learned about your offer. The more you learn about who is drawn to your business and what attracts customers' attention, the better you can focus future marketing efforts.
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.
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