There are also other problems – for one thing, it’s not a very generic solution. You must customize several parts to work for different queries. If the set of tables used in the outermost FROM clause are different, to be the innermost FROM clause, you have to adjust the WHERE clause to reference the correct primary key (or some combination thereof). Then you have to also keep the ORDER BY in sync. That’s a lot of tweaks if you want to use it for different queries. That is why this is the last method listed here but it is one possible solution.
It's easy to enter a SEQ field manually. Begin by pressing [Ctrl]+[F9]. When Word displays the blank field, enter seq list1, as shown in Figure A. List1 is a required argument; you can use any descriptive name you like as long as it begins with an alpha character. The parentheses distinguish the numbers within the text. They're not part of the field code. Highlight the field code and press [F9] to display the field's value. As you can see in Figure B, the first field returns (1).
Next we will look at scenario 2. The variation here is that Apex wants to start each year with anew sequence of numbers. Also, they want to include the year when displaying this number. We still use a DMax, but we need to add criteria to determine the year. So Apex needs to have a field in their table that indicates the date. Generally, such inquiries will have a date/time stamp to indicate when received or the user will input the date and time. So we will assume there is a field in record called InquiryDate. We will also add an Integer field named Sequence. On the form we will add a control bound to Sequence, but set its Visible property to No. The line of code will look like this:
Basically, the only difference is that we now maintain a VBA.Collection, and this time we do make use of the UniqueKeyVariant parameter, using it as a key to locate the previously assigned number. If we don’t find it, we add to the VBA.Collection. The SQL to use those 2 functions remains identical. The downside is that if the query generates millions worth of rows, the memory may run out due to a large VBA.Collection. However, if a form is bound to that large dataset, it will likely have several other problems anyway so VBA.Collection should not be a problem for forms that loads a few hundred rows. The other downside is that VBA.Collection will persist indefinitely even long after the query has “finished.” Back to form example, you might need to remember to call the ResetRowNumber() function on a form’s close to ensure that you dispose of the VBA.Collection and free up the memory.
* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.

I created something like this for a demo and didn't have to use a script. If I remember correctly, I leveraged Workflow. Essentially, the form submission would trigger a very simple workflow that would look at the current counter value on a database table and increment it by 1. The next form would then start with a lookup that would grab that counter and put it into a read-only (or hidden) field. Rinse and repeat.


Erica Gamet has been involved in the graphics industry for an unbelievable 30 years! She is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other print- and production-related topics. She is a regular presence at CreativePro Week’s PePcon and InDesign Conferences, and has spoken at ebookcraft in Canada and Making Design in Norway. You can find Erica’s online tutorials at CreativeLive and through her YouTube channel. When she isn’t at her computer, she can be found exploring her new homebase of Seattle and the greater Pacific Northwest.
Footnotes, after all, are always numbered sequentially and update when you add or remove one. The problem is that each time you add a footnote you get an extra space down at the bottom of the column. The solution? Make a paragraph style for your footnotes that specifies a .1 pt tall size with a 0 (zero) leading, then choose that paragraph style in the Document Footnote Options dialog box.
So, as an example, I’ll start with the style linked to the interrogatory in my multi-level list, type my question, hit return and I’ve got the answer space. Return again, another interrogatory ready to go. Wanted request for production instead of interrogatory? Hit the tab key and it switches to the next list level, which is request for production. (I hope I’ve explained this well enough.)
It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.
Yes, I’m a little confused by your brief too. The script that I describe here will create an array of numbers using any step value that it offers, including by 1 number each time. Whether you put the resulting list directly into InDesign as text, or indirectly using the Data Merge feature is up to you. Perhaps learn more about the Data Merge feature of InDesign itself – David Blatner has a great series on Lynda.com that will explain Data Merge much more than I can on this thread.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.

2. In Word 2007 & later, if you put the macro into your 'Capital_Unit_Certificate' document, you'll need to save the document in the docm format and you'll need to enable macros whenever you open the document if you want to print the certificate. Alternatively, if you add the macro to Word's 'Normal' template, the macro will always be available (to you only) an you can keep the document in it's docx format - plus you won't get macro warnings every time you open it.


I am attempting to write a query joining two linked tables in a query by payroll number (all numeric). When write the query and join by payroll number I get the "Data Type Mismatch in Expression" error. Both tables have the Data Type as "Number", but the only difference I can tell is one has "Field Size" as "Decimal" and the other has "Field Size" as "Double". I have even tried to join on the VAL() of each payroll number field with no luck. Any ideas? "Decimal" and "Double" are actually different dat...

I create a CStatic object and write some text to the object but the text is too long to display in the work area but I don't konw how to add a vscroll to a CStatic object who can help me? I would say instead of a CStatic, use a CEdit control with the ReadOnly flag set. Because static controls by default aren't scrollable, so even if you add a scrollbar to it, you will have to manage the entire thing yourself (drawing, scrolling....), more trouble than it's worth. Ali R. "Smallfrogs" wrote in message news:eLAO92y7DHA.2832@tk2msft...
You won’t use any of the standard List Number styles for SEQ field numbering. You need to create your own style if you want correct indentation and alignment with the tab position of the first word after the number. In this example, I’ll create a new style called Step Number, but you can call it whatever you want. In this example, I’ve also used the default settings for tab and hanging indent positions — you can change these later if you want.
I have a table named Artifact Catalog in which there is a field Collection Point ID and a field Artifact ID. On the form I have created the user will input the Collection Point ID, for example: 2-1050. I need to find a way to have this Collection Point ID automatically generate a corresponding Artifact ID, i.e when you click the save button the first record under Artifact ID becomes: 2-1050.1 and the second becomes 2-1050.2 and so on.
Using the instructions in #5, add an incrementing SEQ field. You can highlight any of them, except the reset field. For step 7, enter n}. n is the default switch that inserts the next number in the sequence, making it easy to remember. You don't have to specify the \n switch, because it's the default, but you can add it if it helps document your choice.
For example, in our law practice, we submit briefs with hundreds of attachments. Those attachments are constantly being reorganized (thus renumbered) and we had to develop a scheme to keep each attachment (and reference to each attachment) organized and accurate. We created a master list of attachments, and captured the dynamic field code in a bookmark. We can then cross-reference to that bookmark (which will return a number) through our documents. Example Public Attachment 68 (where 68 represents a field sequence code, is captured in a bookmark we will call SR_112). The bookmark name is a code name supplied by the drafting lawyer. That way, when the lawyer refers throughout the document to Public Attachment ___, we insert a cross reference to bookmark SR_112, and it always returns an accurate number, even if we reorganize the order of our attachments.

Gift certificates and promotional coupons can play an important role in your marketing strategy by drawing new and repeat customers to your business. However, how can you tell if they are really working to help you develop your business? To make the most of your time and your marketing budget, you need to track the success of your marketing efforts so that you can determine what marketing tactics are effective for which customers.


Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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