If you prefer, you can use a macro to print out your numbered copies. For instance, the following macro asks you how many copies you want to print, along with the starting copy number to use. (This comes in real handy if you print 25 copies, and then someone asks you to print a second batch of 10, numbered 26 through 35.) The macro also stores the last copy number between sessions, so that it is used as the default when you next run the macro.
I make the design with as many up as I need on the master page, linking the frames where the numbers will go. Then I make the list using Excel, copy paste to ID and apply a paragraph style with "start in next frame" option. Click the outbox on the pasted text to get a loaded cursor and delete the frame. Then just shift-click over the first textframe on a live page to have as many "tickets" added as needed automatically.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
First, you have to use YOUR field and control names. The ones I use are samples. The error you are getting indicated you do not have a control named txtProject. So you have to substitute the correct name of the control. bound to the ProjectID field. By the way it is not a good idea to the octothorpe(#) as part of a field name. A controlname may be different from a fieldname. The name property of a control is on the Other tab in the Properties dialog.

- [Instructor] In this week's Word tip I'd like to address a question I'm often asked by people working in tables here in Microsoft Word and that is is there a way to quickly have numbers automatically fill up cells in the table much like they might in Microsoft Excel when you have incremental numbers that need to appear by simple clicking and dragging the corner of a cell. Well, yes, it can be done here in the table in Microsoft Word. It's not done the same way but it is just as easy and we're going to do it with this file, LeafAndMortar Inventory 040. If you have the exercise files, open it up. Now, if you don't have the exercise files, just use one of your own tables. All you need is an empty column. You can see here on page one we do have a table for garden tools and inventory and we need to number these and instead going into each cell and typing in a new number that increments by one, we're going to use a trick to have it automatically fill up that way. On page two of this document you can see there's a second table for hardscaping tools, so we want to differentiate these numbers, so we might want, for example, hardscaping tools, their item numbers to start with the letters HT whereas the garden tools up above might need to start with GT and then the number. Keep that in mind as we now go to the column where we want the numbers to appear. All you need to do is select the entire column. In this case we have a header column with a label in there, item number, so we're not going to use the trick of going to the top and clicking when that arrow appears, instead we're going to select the cells where the numbers need to go. With them selected, now we'll go to the ribbon. With the Home tab selected, go to the Paragraph group and just go to the Numbering dropdown arrow. Don't click the numbering button, that's going to add the default number but click the dropdown. You'll see the different numbering options that are already in the numbering library. You can hover over those to see what it's going to look like. You can see the numbers incrementing by one with a period or with brackets. We could use Roman numerals, even lettering here but if we want our own numbers, we go down a little bit further and click Define New Number. Give that a click. You should see the number style one, two, three selected. Click that dropdown and if you wanted to use something other than one, two, three, like Roman numerals or letters, they're there as well but we do want to start with just plain old numbers one, two, three. And you can see what shows up down below. The number format is the number and then a period and we see a sample of what that's going to look like down below. Well, the first thing we can do is click in that field just to the right of the period and hit your backspace key to take it out, we don't need the period. Now, we can move over to the left side of the number by using the left cursor key or you can click if you want just in front of the one and here's where we can add things like letters. GT, for example, then a dash and if that's all we need, we'll see GT-1, two, three etc. all the way down the column. Maybe you'd like to add zeros in there, like 01, 02 etc. You can do that as well. Once you have exactly what you want, simply click OK and it's done and by the way, that number format is there going forward, so the next time you want to use it, it's going to show up in your numbering library in the document as a number format and if it's one you've recently used, it shows up on this list as well, so you can choose it any time you like. Just click in the background and close that up, click outside the table to deselect everything to see how easy that was to get incremental numbers that start with letters and a dash. Now, scroll down to the table on the second page. Now that you know how to do this, you're going to create your own number style that starts with HT, a dash, perhaps a zero and then incremental numbers by following those same steps on this table. That's your homework knowing what you know after this week's Word tip.


Word's numbering feature is easy to use, but it doesn't work in all situations. For instance, it can't handle an inline number sequence. By inline, I mean a sequence of numbers positioned within regular text. Fortunately, the SEQ field code handles these situations. I'll start by showing you how to insert the SEQ field code manually, for those one-time occurrences. If you use this feature often, you'll want to add AutoCorrect items for quick insertion into your text. So we'll look at that, too.
Hello, I'm looking for a way to quickly find what numbers are missing in column B. I can sort them ascending, but how do I find if there are missing numbers? 1 2 3 5 6 7 9 I need to know 4 and 8 are missing. Thank you. One way: select B2:Bx. Choose Format/Conditional Formatting... CF1: Formula is =(B2-B1)>1 Format1: / or, without sorting, select column B (with B1 active): CF1: Formula is =AND(B1>MIN(B:B),COUNTIF(B:B,B1-1)=0) Both CF's will activate if there are missing numbers before them. In article <28706E9E-2624...

Before you complete the merge, preview the merge results to make sure that the tracking numbers will display as you want them to in your publications. You can preview the merge in two ways: While you are refining the layout to review the layout of the individual coupon or gift certificate, or when you are getting ready to print, to preview the arrangement of coupons or gift certificates on the printed sheet.


For years, I've applied an autonumbered style to the first cell I want to be sequentially numbered. When I add rows, the cells immediately below continue that same numbered style whether I add them by tabbing from the end of the last row or by using the commands to inserts rows above or below. Because the numbering is part of a style, it can continue from one table to another, but it can always be restarted. I can even skip a row by changing the style for the particular cell or by just toggling off the numbering. I also use it to show two levels of numbering in a single cell by creating two autonumbered styles in a hierarchy that works just like Heading 1 and Heading 2.
You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.
I’d like to use this for Exhibits/Appedices. If we refer to the same Exhibit # in a footnote or elsewhere in the document, and then the Exhibit reference is moved, it causes an error in the footnote or reference. Is there a way to cross-reference this, or to have it cross-reference automatically? Lawyers want to use this but I can’t see them bothering to cross-reference the footnotes. Thanks.
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
All I want to know is, how do you link fields, like {SEQ}, to a style – so that if I select/apply style “Figure Caption” (my style, I also have “Table Caption”), I get not just the attributes of the style (what it looks like, where it is on the page etc.) but I get a chapter (or section) number + a sequence number added, (e.g. “2-3”). I know about STYLEREF and SEQ Figure # and/or calling a section number (if required) – but I can’t find out how to take the simple and to me obvious step to have sequential numbering (prefixed with either “Figure” or “Table”) attached to my Figure Caption style. It all seems to be a two-step process: (i) select the style, (ii) select the numbering. I want to do both at style level. I want to see/get (e.g.) “Figure 2-3: Linking figure numbering to styles” just by applying my “Figure Caption” style to my figure caption text “Linking figure numbering to styles”. Please, only tell me how to do that, how to link chapter/sequence numbering via a style – i.e. in just one step – applying the style.

To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.
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