If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.


It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.
One other thought. It may not hurt to make option 1 a logical expresssion where it will update the number IF a number other than 0 already exists for it. This will prevent it from giving a new number if you go back, edit it and save it. I accomplished this by adding the following (roughly): If PONo=0 Then My.PONo…. (Expression and save command) Else (Save Command)
But we won’t be stopping at just using a field code to increment the numbers. I’m also going to show you how to save the text (“Interrogatory No.” etc.) that precedes each number as an AutoText entry. That means you’ll be able to type just four letters and hit the Enter key (those are the “5 keystrokes” promised above) and Word will finish the phrase for you, complete with the sequence code to increment the discovery request number for you.
If you prefer, you can use a macro to print out your numbered copies. For instance, the following macro asks you how many copies you want to print, along with the starting copy number to use. (This comes in real handy if you print 25 copies, and then someone asks you to print a second batch of 10, numbered 26 through 35.) The macro also stores the last copy number between sessions, so that it is used as the default when you next run the macro.

If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
Automata or finite state machines can typically be thought of as directed graphs, with edges labeled using some specific alphabet, Σ. Most familiar types of automata transition from state to state by reading input letters from Σ, following edges with matching labels; the ordered input for such an automaton forms a sequence called a word (or input word). The sequence of states encountered by the automaton when processing a word is called a run. A nondeterministic automaton may have unlabeled or duplicate out-edges for any state, giving more than one successor for some input letter. This is typically thought of as producing multiple possible runs for a given word, each being a sequence of single states, rather than producing a single run that is a sequence of sets of states; however, 'run' is occasionally used to mean the latter.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.

Although sequences are a type of function, they are usually distinguished notationally from functions in that the input is written as a subscript rather than in parentheses, i.e. an rather than f(n). There are terminological differences as well: the value of a sequence at the input 1 is called the "first element" of the sequence, the value at 2 is called the "second element", etc. Also, while a function abstracted from its input is usually denoted by a single letter, e.g. f, a sequence abstracted from its input is usually written by a notation such as {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n\in A}} , or just as {\displaystyle (a_{n})} . Here A is the domain, or index set, of the sequence.
To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.

Scott, you’ll need to be more specific to help me. When you say “put this code behind a save button” what exactly does that mean – where do I type the code you provided? Yes, I do have a Save Button, which saves the record and closes the form (but currently has no way to save the next sequential Project ID). I want show this next Project ID (number on the entry form) and have that new number flow to the table along with the other data on the form.
I have screen shots of what I have in my db, where can I send it to you (it is in word format) so that you can take a look at it to see what I am doing wrong. I took a screen shot of what is listed for the button and I took a screen shot of the text box Job No. I don’t know how to bound anything other than put the code behind the button and putting the Job_No in the code as you stated. I understand what you are saying, but I thought if I put the text box name Job No in the code behind the button then it would be bound to my table with the Job No field. Heeeelllllppppp!!!! I am sorry that I can’t seem to grasp this….but appreciate all of your help!
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.

Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.

I have now permanently “baked” the Inline Counter system into my InDesign defaults. With no documents open, I made a “Counter” CharStyle and a “Zero Footnote” ParStyle, with those crucial zero-level type size attributes, and selected them in the Document Footnote Options. I also added a blank space as a prefix and a period and a blank space as a suffix. Then I made a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-F) for the Footnote/Counter. So now Inline Counters can be inserted anywhere and anytime with close to zero efforts.


This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
If you make a list of things you need to do, starting with number 1 and continuing until all your tasks are accounted for, then you’ve made a sequential list. Something that is sequential often follows a numerical or alphabetical order, but it can also describe things that aren’t numbered but still need to take place in a logical order, such as the sequential steps you follow for running a program on your computer.
My issue is trying to create small dot labels or equivalent to make up sequential alpha numeric labels to identify each individual item that I have in my shop, retrospectively. I have possibly 6-8thousand individual items that need coding for stock take purposes yet I can find no outlet that supply such thing. Do you have any suggestions. My line is antiques/collectables, predominantly china with items ranging in size from 2-3cm to 5/600cm. I would be most grateful for any solutions or suggestions. Best regards. Pete.
I want to have textbox with 2 columns with footnotes running across the bottom of those columns in one column. ID CS3 footnotes can’t handle this. So I have added fake footnote refs in the doc. using this idea. Now the footnotes themselves I can create in another text frame and use this idea again to create them and then manually place them at the bottom of the page. The only problem however with this is the FN options carrry across the whole doc. right? So even if I create a second doc for the footnotes themselves with different options and then later paste it into the main doc it’ll get messed up right?
By omitting the dbFailOnError parameter only for the DROP TABLE statement, we won’t get a runtime error about a table not existing but get runtime errors if we can’t create the table or insert data for some reasons. I’m also not a big fan of creating multiple saved queries that are meant to be logically grouped together – it gets quite cluttered when there are several saved queries in a navigation pane like that. Keeping it all in VBA makes it clearer that the intention is to execute those statements together.
As you can see, the sequence name can be most anything (e.g. mySeq, A, B, or Bob's_your_uncle). If you start a sequence with a new sequence name the numbering restarts with 1. Look at Mary's first chore in the right hand column. Here you see the reset switch \r1 was used. This switch directs Word to restart the sequence named "A" with "1" at this point.
The Nz function will return 0 if there are no records so this expression will return a 1 the first time and then increment the highest number each additional time. The key is where to put this line of code. As I said it needs to be generated immediately prior to saving the record so that another user does not get the same number. So generally I would put this behind a Save button or a button to specifically generate the number. I would then add a second line to commit the records. Either:
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