If you work in a business where you need to sequentially number items, you might be wondering if there is a way you can use Word to create the labels for you. Word has many ways you can implement some type of numbering in your documents. For instance, you can use different fields for numbering, or use numbered lists, the captioning feature, or you can use mail merging. While all of these features (and more) use some type of numbering in them, they are not all well suited to creating labels.
I'm producing gift certificates for a restaurant and they need to be numbered sequentially from 0001 to 0250. Is there any way to do this easily as opposed to numbering each manually? I'm sure I could probably work it out with a print shop, but the job was thrust on me last minute and my options are limited by the short turn around time. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!...
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
A sequence can be thought of as a list of elements with a particular order. Sequences are useful in a number of mathematical disciplines for studying functions, spaces, and other mathematical structures using the convergence properties of sequences. In particular, sequences are the basis for series, which are important in differential equations and analysis. Sequences are also of interest in their own right and can be studied as patterns or puzzles, such as in the study of prime numbers.
A series is, informally speaking, the sum of the terms of a sequence. That is, it is an expression of the form {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} or {\displaystyle a_{1}+a_{2}+\cdots } , where {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of real or complex numbers. The partial sums of a series are the expressions resulting from replacing the infinity symbol with a finite number, i.e. the Nth partial sum of the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} is the number
Here, you’ll be given the chance to name your AutoText entry. Name it carefully — for AutoText to work correctly, the first four letters of each of your AutoText entry names will need to be distinct, since these first four letters will be the prompt for Word to offer to complete the phrase for you. My suggestion is to use Interrogatories, Production and Admission as your names, but use whatever is convenient and memorable for you.
Hello! I would like to chart varying salaries against specific Low, middle and high numbers. Any suggestions on how to show this? Example: Salary 1 10000 Salary 2 12000 Salary 3 16000 Low 9000 Mid 15000 High 19000 THANK YOU! Do you want the Low-Mid-High values to be like a benchmark to measure salaries against? You could put horizontal lines across your chart, and use markers for the salary data. Here' a few ways to get your lines: http://peltiertech.com/Excel/Charts/AddLine.html - Jon ------- Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP Peltier Technical Services Tutorials...
I need to add 4 "technical contact" fields (which would lookup the Contact entity) to the CONTRACT form. Is this possible? I've found it difficult to figure out what to do first. Thanks in advance, Brandon Not possible. You cant have multiple lookups for the same entity. You also cannot create new relationships between two system entitites. This will work in 4.0 Not possible, Pezman. N:M relationships are not possible in 3.0 yet. There is a alternative solution: a new entity to act as an N:M relationship. In your case, Contract/Contact. This entity has two 1:N relations...
There are a number of ways to denote a sequence, some of which are more useful for specific types of sequences. One way to specify a sequence is to list the elements. For example, the first four odd numbers form the sequence (1, 3, 5, 7). This notation can be used for infinite sequences as well. For instance, the infinite sequence of positive odd integers can be written (1, 3, 5, 7, ...). Listing is most useful for infinite sequences with a pattern that can be easily discerned from the first few elements. Other ways to denote a sequence are discussed after the examples.
I am trying to create a macro for outlook 2016 appointments that would add a number sequentially each time the appointment template was opened. I need to run this under public user so as others open it will give next number. Thank you in adance here is form Sequential Number Here Outside Assignment #: Click here to enter text. Court Reporter Needed: Click here to enter text. Job Type: Click here to enter text. Referral: Click here to enter text. Assignment Date: Click here to enter a date. Contact: Click here to enter text. Time: Click here to enter text.… Read more »
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.

Other examples of sequences include ones made up of rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers. The sequence (.9, .99, .999, .9999, ...) approaches the number 1. In fact, every real number can be written as the limit of a sequence of rational numbers, e.g. via its decimal expansion. For instance, π is the limit of the sequence (3, 3.1, 3.14, 3.141, 3.1415, ...). A related sequence is the sequence of decimal digits of π, i.e. (3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, ...). This sequence does not have any pattern that is easily discernible by eye, unlike the preceding sequence, which is increasing.
By omitting the dbFailOnError parameter only for the DROP TABLE statement, we won’t get a runtime error about a table not existing but get runtime errors if we can’t create the table or insert data for some reasons. I’m also not a big fan of creating multiple saved queries that are meant to be logically grouped together – it gets quite cluttered when there are several saved queries in a navigation pane like that. Keeping it all in VBA makes it clearer that the intention is to execute those statements together.
You won’t use any of the standard List Number styles for SEQ field numbering. You need to create your own style if you want correct indentation and alignment with the tab position of the first word after the number. In this example, I’ll create a new style called Step Number, but you can call it whatever you want. In this example, I’ve also used the default settings for tab and hanging indent positions — you can change these later if you want.
OK, so what didn’t you understand in my blog? The blog contains instructions on how to deal with this. It tells you that you do not want an LH Identifier field. It tells you that all you need is to add a Sequence field to store the Sequential number. It tells you how to base that number on the current year so it restarts with the new year, Finally it tells you how to combine the year and the sequence # with whatever else you need to display the LH identifier. These instructions are all detailed in the blog.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
Any code can read the serial number of a mother board? any example? Thanks! Crystal On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 00:07:16 +0800, "Crystal Lin" wrote: >Any code can read the serial number of a mother board? any example? Thanks! > Do all computers have "mother boards" and do all mother boards have serial numbers? > Any code can read the serial number of a mother board? any example? Thanks! You can read the Serial Number of the hard drive using DiskId32 at http://www.winsim.com/diskid32/diskid32.html . Lynn Let me guess: another mis...
 I'm looking for a script for Laserfiche Forms that will query a database and pull the next number in sequence and display it as the unique identifier for this document.  Once this number has been used, the number should not be used again.  This is similar to what the Submission ID is, but from what I can gather, this number is assigned after the submission takes place.  
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