One option, of course, is to print the individual copies of the document, making the edits to the copy number between each print. This gets tedious, real fast. You may also want to utilize a sequential numbering field (as discussed in other WordTips) and make the number of copies equal to what you need to print. Thus, if you have to print 25 copies, you could simply copy the entire document (including the sequential numbering field), move to the end of the document, and paste it in another 24 times. This makes for a rather large overall document, however, and there are easier ways to approach the problem.
I have been researching using sequential numbers for invoices an purchase orders, but all of them seem to advance the number eithe every time the document is opened or saved. My purchase order is par of a larger file, and since I will be opening and saving the fil without necessarily writing a purchase order I need more control ove its advancement. I was wondering how I could create a button that whe pressed or selected would advance the number by 1? Also, how could make it create a unique number depending on who's creating the purchas order. For example, let's say the user is ...
This will work OK for a small set of data, but the more data there is, the more intensive the subquery becomes, and it must be called repeatedly for each row. This is one of those rare cases where doing it in VBA is faster than doing it in SQL — after all, row numbering is fundamentally iterative, not set-based which just goes against the grain of what SQL was designed to do – solve a problem in a set-based fashion, non-iterative fashion.
One option, of course, is to print the individual copies of the document, making the edits to the copy number between each print. This gets tedious, real fast. You may also want to utilize a sequential numbering field (as discussed in other WordTips) and make the number of copies equal to what you need to print. Thus, if you have to print 25 copies, you could simply copy the entire document (including the sequential numbering field), move to the end of the document, and paste it in another 24 times. This makes for a rather large overall document, however, and there are easier ways to approach the problem.
Next we will look at scenario 2. The variation here is that Apex wants to start each year with anew sequence of numbers. Also, they want to include the year when displaying this number. We still use a DMax, but we need to add criteria to determine the year. So Apex needs to have a field in their table that indicates the date. Generally, such inquiries will have a date/time stamp to indicate when received or the user will input the date and time. So we will assume there is a field in record called InquiryDate. We will also add an Integer field named Sequence. On the form we will add a control bound to Sequence, but set its Visible property to No. The line of code will look like this:

I want to have textbox with 2 columns with footnotes running across the bottom of those columns in one column. ID CS3 footnotes can’t handle this. So I have added fake footnote refs in the doc. using this idea. Now the footnotes themselves I can create in another text frame and use this idea again to create them and then manually place them at the bottom of the page. The only problem however with this is the FN options carrry across the whole doc. right? So even if I create a second doc for the footnotes themselves with different options and then later paste it into the main doc it’ll get messed up right?
InDesign allows you to add a page number marker to a master page within the document. The master page functions as a template for every page it's applied to, so the consecutive page numbers appear on every page. InDesign updates the page number automatically as you insert, delete and move pages. To add a page number marker to a master page, create a text box on the master page by going to the Type menu and choosing "Insert Special Character," "Markers" and then "Current Page Number."
Hi Jason! Hard to say when I’m not sure which part isn’t working for you. If the numbering isn’t continuing across separate frames, you need to make sure you’re using a list. If they are in the wrong order, remember it uses the paste/creation order to number them. If neither of those fix it, let me know what specific issue you’re having. Good luck!

Ok I guess it is better for me to explain what I am doing. I am in the process of creating an Access Database that an individual has been using an Excel spreadsheet forever and a day. Well the individual has on occasion doubled up numbers, forgot numbers, etc. So on what I have learned from different Access courses and Google searches I am trying to apply my knowledge.


With the numbered paragraphs shown above, there is no extra spacing between the paragraphs. That’s easy to fix. Go ahead and type out at least part of your first numbered paragraph, then go to the Page Layout tab and adjust the value of Spacing After in the Paragraph section. Still no extra space? There’s one more setting to check. Click the launcher arrow in the lower right-hand corner to go to the Paragraph dialog box, uncheck the box next to “Don’t add space between paragraphs of the same style.” Click OK. That paragraph and all the remaining numbered ones will have more breathing room.
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
Footnotes, after all, are always numbered sequentially and update when you add or remove one. The problem is that each time you add a footnote you get an extra space down at the bottom of the column. The solution? Make a paragraph style for your footnotes that specifies a .1 pt tall size with a 0 (zero) leading, then choose that paragraph style in the Document Footnote Options dialog box.
Ok I guess it is better for me to explain what I am doing. I am in the process of creating an Access Database that an individual has been using an Excel spreadsheet forever and a day. Well the individual has on occasion doubled up numbers, forgot numbers, etc. So on what I have learned from different Access courses and Google searches I am trying to apply my knowledge.

As you can see, the sequence name can be most anything (e.g. mySeq, A, B, or Bob's_your_uncle). If you start a sequence with a new sequence name the numbering restarts with 1. Look at Mary's first chore in the right hand column. Here you see the reset switch \r1 was used. This switch directs Word to restart the sequence named "A" with "1" at this point.
This tip was very helpful. Now I have been able to automatically number dozens of examples in a linguistics paper, and as I revise the paper and insert new examples between the existing examples, the numbering is automatically adjusted. Now the next step is how to use bookmarks for the references to the examples in the text of the paper. The references need to point to specific examples, and need to be automatically adjusted when the numbering of examples is adjusted. Any ideas on how to do this?
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.
Rush Flyer Printing offers sequential numbering printing services. We ensure that highest standard of quality is maintained throughout the project to ensure accuracy. We use modern technology and state-of-the-art equipment to ensure that the printing gets done with highest quality standards. We understand that most business today require fast turnaround time and hence offer same day printing solutions for various products. We can even offer same day store pick up for clients from Long Island and New Jersey.
CK Note: Word 2007 - 2013 interface has an different automatic numbering scheme which I have been told is much less subject to corruption. Microsoft Word 2010 Bible by Herb Tyson, MVP. However numbering is still very imperfect in these later versions. I still recommend following Shauna Kelly's step-by-step instructions (see above) if setting up numbering in a template or in a document likely to be heavily edited. If you start without doing this and end up with "spaghetti numbering," fixing it will be a very large chore!
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.

To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
Basically, the only difference is that we now maintain a VBA.Collection, and this time we do make use of the UniqueKeyVariant parameter, using it as a key to locate the previously assigned number. If we don’t find it, we add to the VBA.Collection. The SQL to use those 2 functions remains identical. The downside is that if the query generates millions worth of rows, the memory may run out due to a large VBA.Collection. However, if a form is bound to that large dataset, it will likely have several other problems anyway so VBA.Collection should not be a problem for forms that loads a few hundred rows. The other downside is that VBA.Collection will persist indefinitely even long after the query has “finished.” Back to form example, you might need to remember to call the ResetRowNumber() function on a form’s close to ensure that you dispose of the VBA.Collection and free up the memory.
Modern businesses today require their products to carry unique numbers printed on them for identification purposes. This is where sequential numbering is important. It involves printing of numbers in an ordered or sequential form on to the products or documents. Sequential number printing can be done either in ascending or descending order on a variety of paper types. They can be either be alphanumerical combination or completely numerical. The numbers can be printed anywhere on the media and the sequencing can start from any number the client prefers.
Awhile back, there was an add-on for excel that had a lot more tools. It showed on the toolbar. Somehow I lost it and I would like to get it back. It had a lot of tools like for changing case and fill ins. Any help wouyld be great. Maybe ASAP Utilities. Try a 'net search for this add-in. Gord Dibben MS Excel MVP On Sun, 22 Mar 2009 20:22:43 -0400, "kmkx70a" wrote: >Awhile back, there was an add-on for excel that had a lot more tools. It >showed on the toolbar. Somehow I lost it and I would like to get it back. It >had a lot of t...
I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the number of copies each time I print? Hi you could record a macro while doing this manually and assign a shortcut or button to this recorded macro -- Regards Frank Kabel Frankfurt, Germany Hebert45 wrote: > I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. > Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the > number of copies each time I print? ...
Bottom Line – So, is there: (1) any way to “save” “Auto Text” entries (or similar) so that several people in the office (i.e. attorney, paralegal, secretary, etc.) can “share” and have access to the same set, and thus work better as a “team”?; and (2) if/when a set of “Auto Text” entries is so saved and created, is there any way to keep it “alive” and “safe” so it “survives” the (inevitable) series of computer updates, fixes, server crashes, etc., that will happen over time in a law office (and even several times during the life a litigation case that may last two years or more in an office)?.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.
 I'm looking for a script for Laserfiche Forms that will query a database and pull the next number in sequence and display it as the unique identifier for this document.  Once this number has been used, the number should not be used again.  This is similar to what the Submission ID is, but from what I can gather, this number is assigned after the submission takes place.  
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