Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
It may be convenient to have the sequence start with an index different from 1 or 0. For example, the sequence defined by xn = 1/log(n) would be defined only for n ≥ 2. When talking about such infinite sequences, it is usually sufficient (and does not change much for most considerations) to assume that the members of the sequence are defined at least for all indices large enough, that is, greater than some given N.

Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.
And of course, it’s not only when you add or delete counters that the numbering auto-updates, but also when you copy or move the text, as when you’re rearranging your listed points. This InDesign inline counter now works exactly like the counters in my old, beloved XyWrite word processors — except I cannot have several counters with separate numbering in the same text story. In XyWrite I could have nine, using only the codes c1, c2,…c9. But for 95% of one’s counter needs, one counter per story is quite ample — as compared to none.
If {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of complex numbers rather than a sequence of real numbers, this last formula can still be used to define convergence, with the provision that {\displaystyle |\cdot |} denotes the complex modulus, i.e. {\displaystyle |z|={\sqrt {z^{*}z}}} . If {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of points in a metric space, then the formula can be used to define convergence, if the expression {\displaystyle |a_{n}-L|} is replaced by the expression {\displaystyle {\text{dist}}(a_{n},L)} , which denotes the distance between {\displaystyle a_{n}} and {\displaystyle L} .
Let’s look at why we have this setup. It seems strange to put a ResetRowNumber() call in a WHERE clause, doesn’t it? However, the WHERE clause is actually resolved prior to the SELECT clause. (For those who wants to geek out on SQL internals, Itzik Ben-Gan, a SQL Server MVP has a great post that outlines the logical query processing. Though this is specific to SQL Server, the Access database engine as well the majority of RBMS engines generally follow the same outline). This gives us a convenient point to ensure that the module level variable lngRowNumber is always correctly reset at the right time (e.g. before we start returning records from a query).
Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers

Hi Scott, I had a question regarding the sequential numbering Apex example…I am looking to automatically restart the sequence every month, which is not a problem using your example (i.e. changing the year to month in the expression). However, I would also like to add in a condition for year, so that the sequence restarts for each month of each year (i.e. my problem is for example that Feb 2011 last sequence number is 5, and then in Feb 2012 this becomes 6, where I would like it to be 1). I am wondering what the syntax would be. Thanks in advance, Lawn.


There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
I'm using Column A of a spreadsheet to number some items in Column B. I've been using Excel's automatic series-filling function, where you drag down from the lower right corner of a cell. However, since some of the rows in Column B are empty, and I don't want them numbered, I have to stop numbering and manually "jump" over the blanks in Column A. Is there a way to automatically number down in Column A, while skipping over the blanks and continuing where I left off? I.e. 1 2 3 4 5 ? Thanks much. Try this in A1: =IF(B1<>"",COUNTA($B$1:B1),"...
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
The partial sums themselves form a sequence {\displaystyle (S_{N})_{N\in \mathbb {N} }} , which is called the sequence of partial sums of the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} . If the sequence of partial sums converges, then we say that the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} is convergent, and the limit {\displaystyle \lim _{N\to \infty }S_{N}} is called the value of the series. The same notation is used to denote a series and its value, i.e. we write {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}=\lim _{N\to \infty }S_{N}} .
A3 is the result of A1/21 I want to bracket the number in A4 In MSWorks I would type the statement ="["&string(A3,0)&"]" In excel I get in some cells [1.436871259834] I'd like it to read [1] Help please. -- rodney@touch88gum.com.au (Remove gum to reply) Rodney, ="["&ROUND(A3,0)&"]" -- HTH, Bernie MS Excel MVP "Rodney" wrote in message news:OkME4oGVEHA.2564@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl... > A3 is the result of A1/21 > I want to bracket the number in A4 > In MSWorks I would type th...
To define a sequence by recursion, one needs a rule to construct each element in terms of the ones before it. In addition, enough initial elements must be provided so that all subsequent elements of the sequence can be computed by the rule. The principle of mathematical induction can be used to prove that in this case, there is exactly one sequence that satisfies both the recursion rule and the initial conditions. Induction can also be used to prove properties about a sequence, especially for sequences whose most natural description is recursive.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.

You can change the numbers in the list by restarting the sequence or by specifying a new start number. You can change the list's style. You can do anything to this list that you can do to a normal numbered list because it is a numbered list, with one exception: the list, while easy to format, is fixed. If you delete an item, the list updates accordingly, but I haven't found a way to add numbers.
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