Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.
Having personalized raffle tickets printed can get expensive, especially if you operate a fund-raising operation and must do this often. An alternative to using costly printing services is to use the raffle ticket template. With the raffle ticket template, you save money. The raffle ticket template also gives you complete creative control. Simply by opening a template in Microsoft Word means that can design it yourself by adding both text and images, all from the comfort of your own home.
Layout your ticket in InDesign, one on each page, using the Page Number function to number the tickets. If you have something like Imposer Pro (I know it doesn't work from InDesign CS3) you can, for instance, impose the pages 4up consecutive and get 4 tickets on an A4. Alternatively, make a PDF of the whole document and impose (manually, if you have to), the advantage here is that this can work as a template for other tickets, simply make a new PDF of the same size and update the PDF in the template document every time you have a new raffle ticket to do.
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.

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The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.

Our do it yourself single roll ticket is a 1” x 2”, sequentially numbered roll ticket that offers 3 lines of text. Choose from 5 different colors and choose your own starting number. Ships within 3 to 5 days. Our do it yourself double roll ticket is a 2’ x 2” with a center perf. They are sequentially numbered roll tickets that offer 6 lines of text. Choose from 5 different colors and choose your own starting number. Ships within 3 to 5 days.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
Creating numbered tickets in Word can seem difficult or even impossible if you are not familiar with all the capabilities of the Word program. If you have tried going to the Word template section and have been unsuccessful or frustrated with all the options and questions, there is an easier way. The simplest resolution for creating numbered tickets is to find existing templates that can be edited and adjusted to fit your needs.
Hi everybody. I am having a problem with a query that I am working on. I have a table containing customer names, trade dates, and dollar amounts. Customers can have multiple trades on the same day, sometimes even the same dollar amount. I want to have the table sorted by name, date, then dollars so the query pulls everything in from lowest/earliest to highest/latest. I was trying to make a query that pulled in the customer name and trade dates, then added a new column called "Row" that had the record number. I want the query to show all names and dates, since there are ... sequential numbering in indesign ×
I came across this website that explained how to do it using Microsoft's "Raffle Ticket" template (https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-create-numbered-tickets-in-word). However, when I tried to update the sequences as the article said, I could not find the option to update the field (I think they were referring to the option "edit field"), after copying and pasting the template onto a second page.
You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
Summary: Templates are a great way to create new documents because they act as intricate patterns to what those new documents should contain. What if you want the new documents to include some sort of automatically incrementing number? This tip looks at ways you can accomplish the task. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)

Whether they're getting ready to win or ready to enter your big event, your guests will love the thrill of entering with our raffle tickets. Each ticket comes with a twin ticket, which means you get to keep one while they keep the other – there's no memorizing of entry numbers with these ticket! Also the number of the ticket remains with your patrons as long as the ticket does! Plus, with the great selection of colors we offer, the ticket isn't going to get lost any time soon.


These tickets are a great size and were pre numbered when they arrived, quite quickly I must add. The template directions were easy to follow and printing was a breeze HOWEVER tickets #201728-201743 were missing from the pack. After receiving an email from the seller, I understand that they DID NOT indicate sequential numbering for which I was in error. I will definately purchase this product again and have resubmitted my 5 star review. Thank you for your prompt response.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
Thank you for these instructions!! I’m using them to auto number my son’s baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I’m using Word on a PC. Thanks!! 

Note that next day air & 2nd day shipping does not mean that you will receive your order in one or two days after you approve it. The shipping is the time that your raffle tickets will take to reach you AFTER they are printed. HOWEVER, we do not guarantee that your package will reach you in two days even if you pay additional for the second day service. Example: If we finish your order and ship it on a Thursday or a Friday you will most likely receive your second day shipment on the next Monday. We are also not responsible for any shipping delays including weather. Our ground shipping is usually through the US Post Office Priority Mail and normally on most orders it will take up to three days to receive your shipment.


The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
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