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If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
We are providing up to 30 different raffle ticket template designs representing different events for you to download to your computer. These templates are professionally designed in Microsoft Word and can be used to create a series of ticket numbers on each ticket within Microsoft Word. We guarantee that by using our raffle ticket templates, you will be creating professional looking raffle tickets for your fund-raising events.
I had wanted to create a file that didn't require Excel as the data source, so I created one using SEQ fields. It was terrible and too huge to mention (thanks Doug Robbins), so I recreated it using Word as the data source so that people who only have Word can use it. You can create up to 5,000 tickets without changing the data file. If you only have Word and need to create more than 5,000 tickets, please don't type the ticket numbers. Just drop me an email and I'll create another data file for you with the required numbers.
Getting Word to put a unique number on each raffle ticket is easy enough, but persuading Word to print out several uniquely-numbered raffle tickets per sheet of paper is very hard (I think it is impossible, actually. At least I couldn't figure it out. UPDATE: I did figure it out. Instructions for printing raffle tickets using Microsoft Word are here.). And you don't really want to have every raffle ticket use up a whole sheet of paper.
I had wanted to create a file that didn't require Excel as the data source, so I created one using SEQ fields. It was terrible and too huge to mention (thanks Doug Robbins), so I recreated it using Word as the data source so that people who only have Word can use it. You can create up to 5,000 tickets without changing the data file. If you only have Word and need to create more than 5,000 tickets, please don't type the ticket numbers. Just drop me an email and I'll create another data file for you with the required numbers.
Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.

The event will set up certain prizes. Raffle tickets are then sold, and the people told to hold them until the raffle is held. Raffle tickets are then drawn randomly, and the holders of the winning tickets get a prize. While organizers can be as creative as they wish, offering bulk purchases of tickets and discounts, the basic rules stay the same. The benefit of holding raffles is that donors enjoy the anticipation of possibly winning a prize, while donating to a charity. This makes raffle tickets one of the most popular ways to earn for a nonprofit.
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The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
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