Creating numbered tickets in Word can seem difficult or even impossible if you are not familiar with all the capabilities of the Word program. If you have tried going to the Word template section and have been unsuccessful or frustrated with all the options and questions, there is an easier way. The simplest resolution for creating numbered tickets is to find existing templates that can be edited and adjusted to fit your needs.

Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
Regarding our full color items that we print: Please note due to the nature of our color printing process (CMYK), we cannot print every color available. Please note also that the color image that you view on your monitor is produced in a mode called RGB. All images we receive are automatically converted to the CMYK mode which may cause a shift in color. In addition, the same RGB color will show up differently from one computer monitor to another because of calibration differences between computer monitors. As such, we will not be responsible for any shift in any color printing and will not reprint any order that we feel is within our printing capability! Our prices are highly discounted because variations may occur. The color printing we produce is visually pleasing, but does not attempt to match exact color.
Now for the slightly hard bit. If you just try and complete your merge now, you'll get several pages of tickets. Each page will have four tickets on it. But all tickets on any page will have the same number. Each page will have a different number, but all the tickets on that page will have the same number. That's no good. You need each ticket to have a different number.
Whether they're getting ready to win or ready to enter your big event, your guests will love the thrill of entering with our raffle tickets. Each ticket comes with a twin ticket, which means you get to keep one while they keep the other – there's no memorizing of entry numbers with these ticket! Also the number of the ticket remains with your patrons as long as the ticket does! Plus, with the great selection of colors we offer, the ticket isn't going to get lost any time soon.
I had wanted to create a file that didn't require Excel as the data source, so I created one using SEQ fields. It was terrible and too huge to mention (thanks Doug Robbins), so I recreated it using Word as the data source so that people who only have Word can use it. You can create up to 5,000 tickets without changing the data file. If you only have Word and need to create more than 5,000 tickets, please don't type the ticket numbers. Just drop me an email and I'll create another data file for you with the required numbers.

Easily design and print your own tickets in minutes. These are fantastic quality, perforated similar to the Avery 16154 but much easier to print. These sheets are serialized with ticket numbers. Choose from a variety of preloaded templates for schools, churches or sports or upload your own images and text. No messing around with Microsoft Word or wasting paper trying to get your sheets to line up! 8 tickets per sheet, 50 sheets per pack, 400 tickets. That's 2X the amount you get at the box stores! Quick and easy free online printing tool at printsometickets(dot)com!! Made from high quality thick 65# cover stock. We want to earn your review and want your event to be a success! Please contact us have any questions.
Easily design and print your own tickets in minutes. These are fantastic quality, perforated similar to the Avery 16154 but much easier to print. These sheets are serialized with ticket numbers. Choose from a variety of preloaded templates for schools, churches or sports or upload your own images and text. No messing around with Microsoft Word or wasting paper trying to get your sheets to line up! 8 tickets per sheet, 50 sheets per pack, 400 tickets. That's 2X the amount you get at the box stores! Quick and easy free online printing tool at printsometickets(dot)com!! Made from high quality thick 65# cover stock. We want to earn your review and want your event to be a success! Please contact us have any questions.

Summary: Templates are a great way to create new documents because they act as intricate patterns to what those new documents should contain. What if you want the new documents to include some sort of automatically incrementing number? This tip looks at ways you can accomplish the task. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.

The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.

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