GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.


The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
Whether they're getting ready to win or ready to enter your big event, your guests will love the thrill of entering with our raffle tickets. Each ticket comes with a twin ticket, which means you get to keep one while they keep the other – there's no memorizing of entry numbers with these ticket! Also the number of the ticket remains with your patrons as long as the ticket does! Plus, with the great selection of colors we offer, the ticket isn't going to get lost any time soon.
Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
Needed tickets for a fundraiser. Template was easy to use. Was able to print on both sides of the tickets. I would have given the product 5 Stars but the preprinted numbers on the tickets weren't all the same format. Some had "commas" in the numbers. i.e., on one full page of tickets, the numbers were in sequential order from 156024 thru 156031. Another page, the numbers had "commas". i.e., 156,032 thru 156,039. We still used the tickets since all the numbers were in sequential order which is what we wanted. Would have preferred not having commas.

There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.


Summary: If you need to include serial numbers in your printed matter (labels, letters, documents, etc.), the best way is through the use of Word's mail-merge capabilities. This tip outlines how you can use this capability to get just the serial numbers you need. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
Needed tickets for a fundraiser. Template was easy to use. Was able to print on both sides of the tickets. I would have given the product 5 Stars but the preprinted numbers on the tickets weren't all the same format. Some had "commas" in the numbers. i.e., on one full page of tickets, the numbers were in sequential order from 156024 thru 156031. Another page, the numbers had "commas". i.e., 156,032 thru 156,039. We still used the tickets since all the numbers were in sequential order which is what we wanted. Would have preferred not having commas.
    Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
Getting Word to put a unique number on each raffle ticket is easy enough, but persuading Word to print out several uniquely-numbered raffle tickets per sheet of paper is very hard (I think it is impossible, actually. At least I couldn't figure it out. UPDATE: I did figure it out. Instructions for printing raffle tickets using Microsoft Word are here.). And you don't really want to have every raffle ticket use up a whole sheet of paper.

I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet. how to numbe using publisher
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