An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
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You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.
Given that Word can support 2,147,483,647 SEQ fields, the whole job could be done in a single document containing 30,000 tickets. On my system, creating such a document took only a few minutes and, once created took about two minutes to update the fields - and that was with about 40,000 pairs of SEQ fields coded as {SEQ Ticket \# 00000} and {SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}. This number formatting is enough to go to 99,999 tickets.
It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
I have done this twice now, getting flustered. The ticket part the person keeps has the correct sequential number on it, but the side that we keep has the same number on it for the whole page. What part am I missing, at first I did not uncheck the box, but this time I did but have the same number on the stub side that we keep with the person's name, etc
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
I would like to number a voucher book, i have place 4 vouchers on a page, the thing is that i want each of these vouchers to start with different number, 100, 200, 300, 400, and then i want to number them 99 times. The problem is that they have to be numbered only 1 per page, so that when i have printed them all i can easily crop them and staple them right up with having to go through it all.
You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.

Hello! I already have automatic numbering set up (to change paragraph numbers automatically when paragraphs are moved within a document) but I would also like to have automatic lettering within the same document that is independent from the numbering. Example, paragraph 1 references Exhibit A, paragraph 2 references Exhibit B, so on and so forth. Currently using the above referenced method, the auto numbering lettering then follows as if the letters are a representation of the corresponding number (if that makes sense), ex: 1 B 3 C 5 D. How do I have the number sequencing independent from the letter sequence? Thank you in advance!
Creating numbered tickets in Word can seem difficult or even impossible if you are not familiar with all the capabilities of the Word program. If you have tried going to the Word template section and have been unsuccessful or frustrated with all the options and questions, there is an easier way. The simplest resolution for creating numbered tickets is to find existing templates that can be edited and adjusted to fit your needs.
Just download the Raffle tickets with consecutive numbering and matching stubs from the Microsoft Office website. It is a 2003 version and I have Office 2010.   The template has sequential numbering and displays 8 tickets on 2 pages, but I need 3000 tickets.  How do I add more tickets to this document.  I have looked online for tutorials, but most are for starting a ticket from scratch.  Please help!!
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”

Regarding our full color items that we print: Please note due to the nature of our color printing process (CMYK), we cannot print every color available. Please note also that the color image that you view on your monitor is produced in a mode called RGB. All images we receive are automatically converted to the CMYK mode which may cause a shift in color. In addition, the same RGB color will show up differently from one computer monitor to another because of calibration differences between computer monitors. As such, we will not be responsible for any shift in any color printing and will not reprint any order that we feel is within our printing capability! Our prices are highly discounted because variations may occur. The color printing we produce is visually pleasing, but does not attempt to match exact color.


Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.


Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.

We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.

An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.


Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package
That’s enough tips for now. You’ll be filling your fundraising thermometer template How to Create Your Custom Excel Fundraising Thermometer Template How to Create Your Custom Excel Fundraising Thermometer Template Use an Excel thermometer chart to visually keep track of your financial goals. Whether you're saving for a new gadget or fundraising for a good cause, here's a step by step tutorial. Read More in no time. Let’s get to the tickets.
Just download the Raffle tickets with consecutive numbering and matching stubs from the Microsoft Office website. It is a 2003 version and I have Office 2010.   The template has sequential numbering and displays 8 tickets on 2 pages, but I need 3000 tickets.  How do I add more tickets to this document.  I have looked online for tutorials, but most are for starting a ticket from scratch.  Please help!!
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
Whether they're getting ready to win or ready to enter your big event, your guests will love the thrill of entering with our raffle tickets. Each ticket comes with a twin ticket, which means you get to keep one while they keep the other – there's no memorizing of entry numbers with these ticket! Also the number of the ticket remains with your patrons as long as the ticket does! Plus, with the great selection of colors we offer, the ticket isn't going to get lost any time soon.
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