I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.
It was the paper size and multiple pages that was stumping me. However I do have a tip for those wanting a short cut to raffle books of 10. It is a little more fidgety so Im sure someone who is experienced with excel (Im not) but it will make the cutting perfect. Print out in sheets of ten and you just need to staple, cut and perforate...then you have 4-5 ready made raffle books.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package
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Now click on the Microsoft Office Word Help option. Consequently, to the right side of the word document, a support box will pop up. You can easily look for the option Search for and after you find this box, you need to type Create numbered tickets and hit on the green arrow. This Help feature will do all the work for you and it will enlist a number of relevant choices in the area of your search. (501 Microsoft Templates)
Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
Our raffle ticket templates have a placeholder for a ticket number, usually “xxx” to remind you it needs to be replaced. Select it, click Insert Merge Field > Ticket. Do the same for the second ticket number placeholder. Most tickets will have two number placeholders because one part of the ticket is for the raffle host (you) and the other is for the purchaser.

Now click on the Microsoft Office Word Help option. Consequently, to the right side of the word document, a support box will pop up. You can easily look for the option Search for and after you find this box, you need to type Create numbered tickets and hit on the green arrow. This Help feature will do all the work for you and it will enlist a number of relevant choices in the area of your search. (501 Microsoft Templates)
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
Thank you for these instructions!! I'm using them to auto number my son's baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I'm using Word on a PC. Thanks!!
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