I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.


I came across this website that explained how to do it using Microsoft's "Raffle Ticket" template (https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-create-numbered-tickets-in-word). However, when I tried to update the sequences as the article said, I could not find the option to update the field (I think they were referring to the option "edit field"), after copying and pasting the template onto a second page.

Our do it yourself single roll ticket is a 1” x 2”, sequentially numbered roll ticket that offers 3 lines of text. Choose from 5 different colors and choose your own starting number. Ships within 3 to 5 days. Our do it yourself double roll ticket is a 2’ x 2” with a center perf. They are sequentially numbered roll tickets that offer 6 lines of text. Choose from 5 different colors and choose your own starting number. Ships within 3 to 5 days.


Summary: If you need to include serial numbers in your printed matter (labels, letters, documents, etc.), the best way is through the use of Word's mail-merge capabilities. This tip outlines how you can use this capability to get just the serial numbers you need. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
Generating numbered tickets in Microsoft Word document might seem quite challenging and a taxing task if you are a novel user who is not adept in handling Word documents.You might have made numerous attempts in exploring Word templates and might have been fruitless, depressed and annoyed with all the alternatives and problems that you might have come across while trying to comprehend how to create tickets in Word.

We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)


Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.

I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count.
Before selling, try to raise as much awareness about your raffle as you can. Flyers are easy to distribute and display – download yours from our free raffle flyer template page. Choose places where you expect a lot of foot traffic. Not only can you hand them out to passersby, but with the right permissions, you can display flyers in store windows and other prominent locations.
Having a series of numbers on a ticket (eg. 3 7 11 13 14 25) randomly given to N participants where N is a very low number (eg. 23) and then devising an algorithm where you can draw one number at a time making sure that you will pick a winner (most likely having a few participants still believing they could be a winner quite far into the drawing) just doesn't add up.
I also use InDesign. An Excel file for numbering is easy to create. Then find DataMerge under Automate to link the data file. When you are ready to export, use the create PDF right on the Datamerge window. You can print as cut / stack on the Fiery (or CREO). REMEMBER - if your customer wants them stapled into books of 6 (for example) each stack has to be divisible by 6 if you are going to staple then cut into individual books.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
The uncomplicated , straight forward and trouble free method for creating numbered tickets (movie ticket template) is to search for existing templates which can be modified and attuned to suit your requirements. Today umpteen numbers of Microsoft word files which provide a wide variety of ticket designs are available throughout the net space. You can either make use of them as they are or you are free to make them unique by making your own alterations. You can insert images or texts that you desire and make them your own!

I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.
We are providing up to 30 different raffle ticket template designs representing different events for you to download to your computer. These templates are professionally designed in Microsoft Word and can be used to create a series of ticket numbers on each ticket within Microsoft Word. We guarantee that by using our raffle ticket templates, you will be creating professional looking raffle tickets for your fund-raising events.
Our do it yourself single roll ticket is a 1” x 2”, sequentially numbered roll ticket that offers 3 lines of text. Choose from 5 different colors and choose your own starting number. Ships within 3 to 5 days. Our do it yourself double roll ticket is a 2’ x 2” with a center perf. They are sequentially numbered roll tickets that offer 6 lines of text. Choose from 5 different colors and choose your own starting number. Ships within 3 to 5 days.
Summary: Need to add a unique serial number to each printed copy of your document? Here's a quick way to print such numbered versions. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, and Word 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Using Sequential Document Serial Numbers.)
Thank you for these instructions!! I’m using them to auto number my son’s baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I’m using Word on a PC. Thanks!! 

If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
×