Subsequently you have to select the template named Raffle tickets 6 per page. Microsoft Word will make available a preview of the chosen template and then inquires whether you wish to download the particular template. Now choose the option to download. Consequently your current word document gets replaced with the template of raffle ticket which is ready to undergo editing in your hand.
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.
Neighborhood businesses: The shops and stores in your own community are great places to start selling your raffle tickets. These are locales you frequent, where you know the owners and are able talk to them while you’re there. The more familiar you are to them, the more likely they’ll support your fundraising efforts and will be willing provide a selling spot for you.
You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.
If your order is placed on the weekend or a holiday, then we will move our production to the next regular working day. PLEASE NOTE that if you order the day before or after a holiday expect a delay until the next working day after the holiday. When Holidays are in the middle of the week this will delay production as well. We do not have any production on Holidays or weekends.
Drag your cursor on the Font toolbar on the top of the ms word document and formulate necessary alterations. If you are troubling to find ways to include images to make your ticket look appealing and rich, then you need not worry. Just put your cursor on the Insert option in the tool bar and hit on it to add appropriate images befitting the occasion.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
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