If you do this, use SecureRandom or whatever really good random number generator you have available. When I ran Windows, the media player shuffle was so bad it would play 5% of the songs 10 times while almost 40% of the songs were still unplayed. Also, you might want to shuffle the entries with one algorithm before picking them with another. Modern Linux has had a lot of thought put into /dev/random. Hashing the value in there might not be great by every measure, but it's a good start. – GlenPeterson May 6 '16 at 19:27

In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.


You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.
Before selling, try to raise as much awareness about your raffle as you can. Flyers are easy to distribute and display – download yours from our free raffle flyer template page. Choose places where you expect a lot of foot traffic. Not only can you hand them out to passersby, but with the right permissions, you can display flyers in store windows and other prominent locations.
Summary: Need to add a unique serial number to each printed copy of your document? Here's a quick way to print such numbered versions. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, and Word 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Using Sequential Document Serial Numbers.)
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.

Summary: If you need to include serial numbers in your printed matter (labels, letters, documents, etc.), the best way is through the use of Word's mail-merge capabilities. This tip outlines how you can use this capability to get just the serial numbers you need. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
The very first step you need to do is to drag your cursor towards the Help icon in the new word document. This icon usually appears in the right part of the top portion of the tool bar listing. It is depicted by a question mark symbol. You have to left click on this menu with your mouse and you need to opt from the type of help listed in the drop-down carte du jour. (Ticket Invitation Templates Download)
These tickets are a great size and were pre numbered when they arrived, quite quickly I must add. The template directions were easy to follow and printing was a breeze HOWEVER tickets #201728-201743 were missing from the pack. After receiving an email from the seller, I understand that they DID NOT indicate sequential numbering for which I was in error. I will definately purchase this product again and have resubmitted my 5 star review. Thank you for your prompt response.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)

Generating numbered tickets in Microsoft Word document might seem quite challenging and a taxing task if you are a novel user who is not adept in handling Word documents.You might have made numerous attempts in exploring Word templates and might have been fruitless, depressed and annoyed with all the alternatives and problems that you might have come across while trying to comprehend how to create tickets in Word.
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
I have done this twice now, getting flustered. The ticket part the person keeps has the correct sequential number on it, but the side that we keep has the same number on it for the whole page. What part am I missing, at first I did not uncheck the box, but this time I did but have the same number on the stub side that we keep with the person's name, etc
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