I'm struggling with this as well. I tried creating a .txt file of sequential numbers 1-99 from Excel and brought it in as a datamerge. My tickets are 8"x3", 3-up, but when I did the merge, InDesign added 3,416 pages. Where the Hell is THAT coming from?? Any clue what I'm doing wrong? I'm using a tutorial that is using CS5, but I don't see how that has anything to do with all those bloody pages.
The very first step you need to do is to drag your cursor towards the Help icon in the new word document. This icon usually appears in the right part of the top portion of the tool bar listing. It is depicted by a question mark symbol. You have to left click on this menu with your mouse and you need to opt from the type of help listed in the drop-down carte du jour. (Ticket Invitation Templates Download)
These tickets are a great size and were pre numbered when they arrived, quite quickly I must add. The template directions were easy to follow and printing was a breeze HOWEVER tickets #201728-201743 were missing from the pack. After receiving an email from the seller, I understand that they DID NOT indicate sequential numbering for which I was in error. I will definately purchase this product again and have resubmitted my 5 star review. Thank you for your prompt response.
It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.

There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
I'm struggling with this as well. I tried creating a .txt file of sequential numbers 1-99 from Excel and brought it in as a datamerge. My tickets are 8"x3", 3-up, but when I did the merge, InDesign added 3,416 pages. Where the Hell is THAT coming from?? Any clue what I'm doing wrong? I'm using a tutorial that is using CS5, but I don't see how that has anything to do with all those bloody pages.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet. how to numbe using publisher
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