Standard sizes for NCR forms are half page (5.5″ x 8.5″), full page (8.5″ x 11″) and legal (8.5″ x 14″) although custom sizes can be ordered to meet your specific need. The design orientation can be either vertical or horizontal. The link below gives you access to design templates that can be used to lay out your form in the appropriate size and orientation. raffle ticket numbering indesign
Permalink Peter, I have done the "master" function successfully. It appears to work.I ran a form job to the press with a large quantity of numbers successfully. Thank you. A full color ticket job with only two hundred sheets did create a large file in my print que however, and feed very slowly. Can you tell me; Does Indesign still create an image for each sheet when printing? I am still a bit confused about the threading technique you mentioned. Would this create an easier feed to the printer or "smaller" file size?
Thank you for these clear instructions. I have had the same problem as Mommy Vaughan and followed the suggestion. However, on re-opening the Word document, I have the dialogue box Invalid Merge Field. I have to use Task Manager to close down Word. I am using Word 2010. Maybe that is part or all of the problem. Any ideas please? I need to sort this by tomorrow night to print them on Monday!
Permalink Peter, I have done the "master" function successfully. It appears to work.I ran a form job to the press with a large quantity of numbers successfully. Thank you. A full color ticket job with only two hundred sheets did create a large file in my print que however, and feed very slowly. Can you tell me; Does Indesign still create an image for each sheet when printing? I am still a bit confused about the threading technique you mentioned. Would this create an easier feed to the printer or "smaller" file size?
Before you complete the merge, preview the merge results to make sure that the tracking numbers will display as you want them to in your publications. You can preview the merge in two ways: While you are refining the layout to review the layout of the individual coupon or gift certificate, or when you are getting ready to print, to preview the arrangement of coupons or gift certificates on the printed sheet.
There are two schools of thought regarding how numeric version numbers are incremented. Most free and open-source software packages, including MediaWiki, treat versions as a series of individual numbers, separated by periods, with a progression such as 1.7.0, 1.8.0, 1.8.1, 1.9.0, 1.10.0, 1.11.0, 1.11.1, 1.11.2, and so on. On the other hand, some software packages identify releases by decimal numbers: 1.7, 1.8, 1.81, 1.82, 1.9, etc. Decimal versions were common in the 1980s, for example with NetWare, DOS, and Microsoft Windows, but even in the 2000s have been for example used by Opera[7] and Movable Type.[8] In the decimal scheme, 1.81 is the minor version following 1.8, while maintenance releases (i.e. bug fixes only) may be denoted with an alphabetic suffix, such as 1.81a or 1.81b.
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
Hello Bruce, I seem to be having a different problem altogether. I created my ticket in word using logos and text boxes as needed, ticket looks great. I followed your very clear instructions but when I did the Finish & Merge I got this message, "You cannot include DATA, NEXT, NEXTIF, or SKIPIF fields in comments, headers, footers, footnotes or endnotes." I then click on OK and get this, "A field calculation error occurred in record 1. Bruce any help would be much appreciated. Thank you!!

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Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
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Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document.
This takes a little figuring out. I spent about 3 hours before I got it right, because I can be a little dense about things sometimes, but if you are going to do set numbers of tickets a few times, the time you spend arranging the numbers is well spent and will be made up on the cutter and in the sorting. It seems to me that you could do the same thing for use with the variable data module on the BizHub. I suspect the issue is that you have consecutive numbers on the same sheet so someone has to sort them all and stack them in order after they're printed and cut.
The document management software automatically assigns a unique number to every single document that is added to FileHold. This number called the FileHold ID Number, it can not be edited by users and is never duplicated in the system. This document numbering can not be turned off. This unique document number is a simple sequential number that starts at number 1 and grows sequential with every new document added to FileHold. In the case of a different version of the same document the number is incremented by a decimal number to indicate a new version. (i.e. A new document added to FileHold may get number 403. If that document is checked out and changed and than checked back in it would get the unique number 403.1. If it is checked out and changed again it would be numbered 403.2 and so forth).
I thank you for your explanation. I also do tickets in a similar manor. I use excel to create the numbers as well. I create a 4 column set of numbers and assign each column to the ticket positions from left to right (four up tickets) on an 8.5 x 11 sheet. I merge the numbers to the tickets and send to print. With Indesign the numbers are able to print from last to first(printing face up, normal order, collated). They then come out stacked in order so that we simply cut and stack each column one on top of the other to complete the number set in order. I am going to try the threading technique you mentioned.
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.

With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.

That’s enough tips for now. You’ll be filling your fundraising thermometer template How to Create Your Custom Excel Fundraising Thermometer Template How to Create Your Custom Excel Fundraising Thermometer Template Use an Excel thermometer chart to visually keep track of your financial goals. Whether you're saving for a new gadget or fundraising for a good cause, here's a step by step tutorial. Read More in no time. Let’s get to the tickets. raffle ticket numbering publisher
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