The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
Add specific codes to coupons to track customer responses     Use different codes for your different marketing messages, advertisements, or promotions. These codes will enable you to keep track of how customers learned about your offer. The more you learn about who is drawn to your business and what attracts customers' attention, the better you can focus future marketing efforts.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Semantic Versioning[1] is a formal convention for specifying compatibility using a three-part version number: major version; minor version; and patch. The patch number is incremented for minor changes and bug fixes which do not change the software’s application programming interface (API). The minor version is incremented for releases which add new, but backward-compatible, API features, and the major version is incremented for API changes which are not backward-compatible. For example, software which relies on version 2.1.5 of an API is compatible with version 2.2.3, but not necessarily with 3.2.4.
Thank you for the explanation. Yes, our digital machine (Minolta Bizhub) does have a variable data module, however the support folks do not seem to be able to successfully get it to number in the correct order for output to print and stack properly for our needs. Indesign works great in this manor but with the quirps we are discussing here. Anyway your assumption that I do not understand threads is true. I have never done "threading". I am going to focus on this next as you mentioned it is easier than data merge. We do numbering of carbonless forms, raffle and event tickets often here and so the "smoother" the better. Apparently my supervisor requires that I make it work with the tools at hand and will not "invest" in any "pricey" new programs.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
When you have Microsoft Publisher at your hand, you need not worry about running to stores to explore and buy tickets for organizing company day outs, vacation give away or a business board meeting. Microsoft Publisher provides you with several Word templates from which you can create event tickets with ease and skill. It even includes the fundamental chronological ordering required for raffles .once you get the ruse of setting up numbers in the ticket series, you can commence numbering in your own style.

The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.

You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.


Semantic Versioning[1] is a formal convention for specifying compatibility using a three-part version number: major version; minor version; and patch. The patch number is incremented for minor changes and bug fixes which do not change the software’s application programming interface (API). The minor version is incremented for releases which add new, but backward-compatible, API features, and the major version is incremented for API changes which are not backward-compatible. For example, software which relies on version 2.1.5 of an API is compatible with version 2.2.3, but not necessarily with 3.2.4.
I'm struggling with this as well. I tried creating a .txt file of sequential numbers 1-99 from Excel and brought it in as a datamerge. My tickets are 8"x3", 3-up, but when I did the merge, InDesign added 3,416 pages. Where the Hell is THAT coming from?? Any clue what I'm doing wrong? I'm using a tutorial that is using CS5, but I don't see how that has anything to do with all those bloody pages.
As far as threading the frames, is it that you don't understand threading? You accomplish that by using the selection tool to click in the outport box (the larger square near the lower right corner of the text frame), then clicking inside the frame you want to be next in the thread. Repeat as often as required, selecting the outport of the last frame you threaded each time. Text will now flow automatically from the first frame to the end of the thread. You can work backwards, too, if you wish, by selecting the inport (upper left) instead of the outport.
Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document. raffle ticket numbering coreldraw
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