I often use Indesigns data merge to variable data number raffle tickets in Indesign. When I do the data merge it apparently creates multiple pages with my numbers in place. It works adequately for "small" runs, however on larger quantities it crashes prior to sending all the pages. I am sure that Indesign is applying the "art" to each page, creating a HUGE file. I apparently do not know how to create a "master" properly so that the art is applied (only once)and the number set is simply imposed to it with each page. I have read the help section but am still confused. Can anyone spell this out for me in "simple english?
Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document.
When you have Microsoft Publisher at your hand, you need not worry about running to stores to explore and buy tickets for organizing company day outs, vacation give away or a business board meeting. Microsoft Publisher provides you with several Word templates from which you can create event tickets with ease and skill. It even includes the fundamental chronological ordering required for raffles .once you get the ruse of setting up numbers in the ticket series, you can commence numbering in your own style.
With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
data merge can be a little tricky for this. Try making a single ticket at the top of your page (not on the master page). Put your merge fields into this ticket. Then when using data merge click the option to put more then one per a page, preview and see if this does what you want it to do. Granted if you have double sided printing, data merge gets very tricky, but can be done.
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number) raffle ticket numbering
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