In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
Creating a sequential list of numbers, in Word, sounds like an intimidating task. Sure, you can create a numbered list quickly enough, but that feature works with additional text - you're numbering something. If you want a list of just numbers, you have to work a bit harder. Word's SEQ field might come to mind, but that solution is better suited to template-type numbering. In order words, this field works great if you're numbering documents, labels, and so on. It doesn't work so well if you just want to create a list of sequential numbers. You can use it that way, but it'll be more work than it's worth.
The most important sequences spaces in analysis are the ℓp spaces, consisting of the p-power summable sequences, with the p-norm. These are special cases of Lp spaces for the counting measure on the set of natural numbers. Other important classes of sequences like convergent sequences or null sequences form sequence spaces, respectively denoted c and c0, with the sup norm. Any sequence space can also be equipped with the topology of pointwise convergence, under which it becomes a special kind of Fréchet space called an FK-space.
Good morning! Directions are clear for sure but when i go to merge the first ticket is one but the second number on the raffle ticket is two. i have four raffle tickets per page the first three are messed up but the forth is correct all the way down to 500. Any ideas? i have tried with a header and without a header. i even made the first number with a formula. it does work with out putting next record but like you said it is four tickets with the same number and that would use a ton of ink. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

The Artifact ID should NOT be your PK. There is no reason for it to be and to try and use it as such will be a headache. A primary key is simply a unique identifier for a record. Many purists will tell you that users should never see the PK and in your case, I would recommend that. Use an Autonumber as you PK and you can use that as your corresponding Foreign Key in related records. To prevent duplication you can make the combination of Collection Point ID and Artifact ID a unique, multi-field index. Then display the combination as I indicated where you need to show the user a record ID. This is all explained int he blog.
The Artifact ID should NOT be your PK. There is no reason for it to be and to try and use it as such will be a headache. A primary key is simply a unique identifier for a record. Many purists will tell you that users should never see the PK and in your case, I would recommend that. Use an Autonumber as you PK and you can use that as your corresponding Foreign Key in related records. To prevent duplication you can make the combination of Collection Point ID and Artifact ID a unique, multi-field index. Then display the combination as I indicated where you need to show the user a record ID. This is all explained int he blog.
The partial sums themselves form a sequence {\displaystyle (S_{N})_{N\in \mathbb {N} }} , which is called the sequence of partial sums of the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} . If the sequence of partial sums converges, then we say that the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} is convergent, and the limit {\displaystyle \lim _{N\to \infty }S_{N}} is called the value of the series. The same notation is used to denote a series and its value, i.e. we write {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}=\lim _{N\to \infty }S_{N}} .

If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)


An easier way is to setup the table in Excel and use the Excel features to create sequential numbering. The cells making up the whole table can then be selected and copied into a Word document using CTRL/C and CTRL/V which will create a table in Word. Column widths and borders can be set up in Excel and cells can be filled in before copying to the Word document.
The Nz function will return 0 if there are no records so this expression will return a 1 the first time and then increment the highest number each additional time. The key is where to put this line of code. As I said it needs to be generated immediately prior to saving the record so that another user does not get the same number. So generally I would put this behind a Save button or a button to specifically generate the number. I would then add a second line to commit the records. Either:
So how long should a doc number be? There’s no hard & fast rule, but a document number can be as short as 5 digits, with a simple discipline descriptor and a sequential number assigned to certain project elements. Most projects can benefit from a numbering protocol that is under 15 digits in length. When broken down, it only needs to hold Author-Discipline-Project Location-Sequence. This is far easier to understand for everyone on the project and, most importantly, its simplicity means there’s less chance of someone, somewhere, making a mistake.
We are providing up to 30 different raffle ticket template designs representing different events for you to download to your computer. These templates are professionally designed in Microsoft Word and can be used to create a series of ticket numbers on each ticket within Microsoft Word. We guarantee that by using our raffle ticket templates, you will be creating professional looking raffle tickets for your fund-raising events.
You may be familiar to view multiple webpages in Firefox/Chrome/IE, and switch between them by clicking corresponding tabs easily. Here, Office Tab supports similar processing, which allow you to browse multiple Excel workbooks or Word documents in one Excel window or Word window, and easily switch between them by clicking their tabs. Click for free trial of Office Tab!

    Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.
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