You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”

You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Coding the documents can be accomplished by using either an “image” of the document or the “hard” copy. The advantage of imaging your documents is that the extent of the coding for the documents can be determined as the case progresses. With imaging, you can always retrieve the document, since it is linked to a particular database record for instant viewing. For example, after a document has been provided limited objective coding and the document’s importance has increased as the case progresses, then the document can be immediately accessed on your computer screen to do subjective coding.
Numbered tickets are a bitch in InDesign. Mainly because if the RIP time. I've found that what I have to do is do two runs. One run of just the tickets with the blank area for the numbers. Then I put those back through the copier to print the numbers on them. You want to set up an excel sheet with just one set of your numbers. Not 1, 1, 2, 2. Just 1-3000. Then you create the text boxes for the numbers for the first ticket and draw a text box that is the exact size of the ticket around and send it to the background. Then do a mail merge. You will grab the mail merge name of the column and drop it into each text box so each text box will have the name of your column (like <>). That means that being the same, each number will go into each box so the first ticket will get number 1 and number 1. Then you do the mail merge doing multiple entries per page or whatever it's called and it will create all the pages needed. So you will end up with a 375 page document to create 3000 total tickets based on an 8 up.
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.

I thank you for your explanation. I also do tickets in a similar manor. I use excel to create the numbers as well. I create a 4 column set of numbers and assign each column to the ticket positions from left to right (four up tickets) on an 8.5 x 11 sheet. I merge the numbers to the tickets and send to print. With Indesign the numbers are able to print from last to first(printing face up, normal order, collated). They then come out stacked in order so that we simply cut and stack each column one on top of the other to complete the number set in order. I am going to try the threading technique you mentioned.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
It was the paper size and multiple pages that was stumping me. However I do have a tip for those wanting a short cut to raffle books of 10. It is a little more fidgety so Im sure someone who is experienced with excel (Im not) but it will make the cutting perfect. Print out in sheets of ten and you just need to staple, cut and perforate...then you have 4-5 ready made raffle books.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.

Your raffle might be subject to gaming commission or tax laws. Check with your municipality, state or province, and federal governments to make sure your raffle is legal. These government departments aren’t just enforcers. They are often great resources on how to run a successful fund raising raffle. Raffles are fun! Getting in trouble with the law or tax man is not.
When you enter your numbering settings, the program automatically runs through them in the background and if they're not logical, the program will suggest more logical numbering settings. In addition to checking the numbering settings, the dimensions are checked when you type them, the text will temporarily turn red if you are inside the margins or off the edge of the paper.
Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
I often use Indesigns data merge to variable data number raffle tickets in Indesign. When I do the data merge it apparently creates multiple pages with my numbers in place. It works adequately for "small" runs, however on larger quantities it crashes prior to sending all the pages. I am sure that Indesign is applying the "art" to each page, creating a HUGE file. I apparently do not know how to create a "master" properly so that the art is applied (only once)and the number set is simply imposed to it with each page. I have read the help section but am still confused. Can anyone spell this out for me in "simple english?
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Just download the Raffle tickets with consecutive numbering and matching stubs from the Microsoft Office website. It is a 2003 version and I have Office 2010.   The template has sequential numbering and displays 8 tickets on 2 pages, but I need 3000 tickets.  How do I add more tickets to this document.  I have looked online for tutorials, but most are for starting a ticket from scratch.  Please help!!
10 Pt. Cast Coat, C1S 80 Lb. Smooth Cover 67 Lb. Bristol Cover 65 Lb. TimberLine Cover 10 Pt. Hot Stock 13 Pt. Tag Stock 24 Lb. Bond 80 Lb. Digital Gloss Cover 80 Lb. Digital Matte Cover 90 Lb. Index 10 Pt. Manilla 110 Lb. Index 100 Lb. Gloss Text 11 Pt. Cast Coat, C1S 12 Pt. Smooth Cover 12 Pt. Cast Coat, C1S 2 Part Carbonless
Simply copy the second page of the template by highlighting that page and pressing CTRL + C. Windows shortcut keys Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Keyboard shortcuts can save you hours of time. Master the universal Windows keyboard shortcuts, keyboard tricks for specific programs, and a few other tips to speed up your work. Read More are wonderful things. Then create a new blank page by pressing CTRL + Enter. Then paste the copied page using CTRL + V. Create a new blank page, and paste again. Keep doing this until you have the desired number of pages that you will need.
I came across this website that explained how to do it using Microsoft's "Raffle Ticket" template (https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-create-numbered-tickets-in-word). However, when I tried to update the sequences as the article said, I could not find the option to update the field (I think they were referring to the option "edit field"), after copying and pasting the template onto a second page.
As far as threading the frames, is it that you don't understand threading? You accomplish that by using the selection tool to click in the outport box (the larger square near the lower right corner of the text frame), then clicking inside the frame you want to be next in the thread. Repeat as often as required, selecting the outport of the last frame you threaded each time. Text will now flow automatically from the first frame to the end of the thread. You can work backwards, too, if you wish, by selecting the inport (upper left) instead of the outport.

Gift certificates and promotional coupons can play an important role in your marketing strategy by drawing new and repeat customers to your business. However, how can you tell if they are really working to help you develop your business? To make the most of your time and your marketing budget, you need to track the success of your marketing efforts so that you can determine what marketing tactics are effective for which customers.
Stack order is used if you want to secure your tickets in a booklet. The program automatically does the math, calculates the placement of the numbers, and prints the pages so that you can staple the booklet pages together, cut them apart into 8 separate books, and each booklet will have consecutive numbers. Stack order prints the first number on page 1, the second number on page 2, and so on.  This style is useful for handing out booklets to several sellers to distribute well before an event or drawing.
Single sheet order means that your tickets will be printed one after the other, in normal numerical order (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.) in column form.  With Single Sheet Order, the numbers 1-8 print on the first page, 9-16 on the second page, and so on.  This style is useful for handing out tickets to buyers individually on the day of the drawing or event.

Stack order is used if you want to secure your tickets in a booklet. The program automatically does the math, calculates the placement of the numbers, and prints the pages so that you can staple the booklet pages together, cut them apart into 8 separate books, and each booklet will have consecutive numbers. Stack order prints the first number on page 1, the second number on page 2, and so on.  This style is useful for handing out booklets to several sellers to distribute well before an event or drawing.
Whether they're getting ready to win or ready to enter your big event, your guests will love the thrill of entering with our raffle tickets. Each ticket comes with a twin ticket, which means you get to keep one while they keep the other – there's no memorizing of entry numbers with these ticket! Also the number of the ticket remains with your patrons as long as the ticket does! Plus, with the great selection of colors we offer, the ticket isn't going to get lost any time soon.
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