An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
The task of producing numbered tickets in Microsoft Word might seem pretty tough and strenuous especially for those people who are not skilled and trained in using Word files. There are quite a lot of people who have been left disappointed, disheartened and exasperated by their failures in attempting to explore how to create tickets for an event using Word templates. Many unanswered queries, doubts and confusions might have stood in the path of your success.
Gift certificates and promotional coupons can play an important role in your marketing strategy by drawing new and repeat customers to your business. However, how can you tell if they are really working to help you develop your business? To make the most of your time and your marketing budget, you need to track the success of your marketing efforts so that you can determine what marketing tactics are effective for which customers.

Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
Just download the Raffle tickets with consecutive numbering and matching stubs from the Microsoft Office website. It is a 2003 version and I have Office 2010.   The template has sequential numbering and displays 8 tickets on 2 pages, but I need 3000 tickets.  How do I add more tickets to this document.  I have looked online for tutorials, but most are for starting a ticket from scratch.  Please help!!
This leads to another often-ignored topic, that of file naming conventions.  What I mean by this is how and where you save the computer file in your computer system.  I know more than one company that has a policy that all documents must be approved by a specific person and the document isn’t considered implemented until that person saves it up on the file server.  This is both good and bad, because MANY times I’ve seen that person receive random phone calls from upper managers within the company that didn’t even try to look for a document – they just called that person and interrupted whatever they were doing in order to have them directed to the document.  If a person wants to be the single point of contact (SPOC) on document management, they might receive a few phone calls they didn’t anticipate.  It may still be worth it.
I am trying to create raffle tickets, 4 on a page with only a number on the stub. My problem is when I get to the print preview and change it to "multiple pages per sheet" it is just changing the number on the next page and not on the next ticket. I followed all the directions on adding the number to each ticket from the merge document (of course all the step by step information I can find is only for 2007 and NOT 2013 so guessing there is something wrong with what I am doing).  When I go into the print screen it is also changing my paper from 8 1/2 x 11 to 11 x 17 and putting 8 on the page.
The uncomplicated , straight forward and trouble free method for creating numbered tickets (movie ticket template) is to search for existing templates which can be modified and attuned to suit your requirements. Today umpteen numbers of Microsoft word files which provide a wide variety of ticket designs are available throughout the net space. You can either make use of them as they are or you are free to make them unique by making your own alterations. You can insert images or texts that you desire and make them your own!
There are two schools of thought regarding how numeric version numbers are incremented. Most free and open-source software packages, including MediaWiki, treat versions as a series of individual numbers, separated by periods, with a progression such as 1.7.0, 1.8.0, 1.8.1, 1.9.0, 1.10.0, 1.11.0, 1.11.1, 1.11.2, and so on. On the other hand, some software packages identify releases by decimal numbers: 1.7, 1.8, 1.81, 1.82, 1.9, etc. Decimal versions were common in the 1980s, for example with NetWare, DOS, and Microsoft Windows, but even in the 2000s have been for example used by Opera[7] and Movable Type.[8] In the decimal scheme, 1.81 is the minor version following 1.8, while maintenance releases (i.e. bug fixes only) may be denoted with an alphabetic suffix, such as 1.81a or 1.81b.
Now for the slightly hard bit. If you just try and complete your merge now, you'll get several pages of tickets. Each page will have four tickets on it. But all tickets on any page will have the same number. Each page will have a different number, but all the tickets on that page will have the same number. That's no good. You need each ticket to have a different number.
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