Standard sizes for NCR forms are half page (5.5″ x 8.5″), full page (8.5″ x 11″) and legal (8.5″ x 14″) although custom sizes can be ordered to meet your specific need. The design orientation can be either vertical or horizontal. The link below gives you access to design templates that can be used to lay out your form in the appropriate size and orientation.
I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
This leads to another often-ignored topic, that of file naming conventions.  What I mean by this is how and where you save the computer file in your computer system.  I know more than one company that has a policy that all documents must be approved by a specific person and the document isn’t considered implemented until that person saves it up on the file server.  This is both good and bad, because MANY times I’ve seen that person receive random phone calls from upper managers within the company that didn’t even try to look for a document – they just called that person and interrupted whatever they were doing in order to have them directed to the document.  If a person wants to be the single point of contact (SPOC) on document management, they might receive a few phone calls they didn’t anticipate.  It may still be worth it.
1. On the first hand, you need to initiate Microsoft Publisher. You can view a magnifying glass icon and you need to hit inside the little field which shows Available Templates page. Now you should type the Word ‘tickets’ and move your cursor towards the magnifying glass icon. Hit on it. Subsequently you need to evaluate and assess the ticket options in the Microsoft Publisher. After that you can double click on the desired template. For example if you want to open the raffle ticket template just double click on it for the Publisher to open it for you.

Standard sizes for NCR forms are half page (5.5″ x 8.5″), full page (8.5″ x 11″) and legal (8.5″ x 14″) although custom sizes can be ordered to meet your specific need. The design orientation can be either vertical or horizontal. The link below gives you access to design templates that can be used to lay out your form in the appropriate size and orientation.
GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.

Standard sizes for NCR forms are half page (5.5″ x 8.5″), full page (8.5″ x 11″) and legal (8.5″ x 14″) although custom sizes can be ordered to meet your specific need. The design orientation can be either vertical or horizontal. The link below gives you access to design templates that can be used to lay out your form in the appropriate size and orientation.
You’re selling raffle tickets to make money, so why buy the tickets pre-printed? Using Microsoft Word’s mail merge function, you can create your own raffle tickets and design them any way you please. A mail merge doesn’t have to make mail; it is simply a way to define certainly elements of a document, then automatically insert variable elements, such as raffle ticket numbers. The most important thing to remember is that each ticket needs a mate–you don’t want to pull winning ticket number 81018 only to find that no one bought that one.

PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

Software versioning is the process of assigning either unique version names or unique version numbers to unique states of computer software. Within a given version number category (major, minor), these numbers are generally assigned in increasing order and correspond to new developments in the software. At a fine-grained level, revision control is often used for keeping track of incrementally different versions of information, whether or not this information is computer software.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.

I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.

There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.


Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.

Coding the documents can be accomplished by using either an “image” of the document or the “hard” copy. The advantage of imaging your documents is that the extent of the coding for the documents can be determined as the case progresses. With imaging, you can always retrieve the document, since it is linked to a particular database record for instant viewing. For example, after a document has been provided limited objective coding and the document’s importance has increased as the case progresses, then the document can be immediately accessed on your computer screen to do subjective coding.
Permalink Peter, I have done the "master" function successfully. It appears to work.I ran a form job to the press with a large quantity of numbers successfully. Thank you. A full color ticket job with only two hundred sheets did create a large file in my print que however, and feed very slowly. Can you tell me; Does Indesign still create an image for each sheet when printing? I am still a bit confused about the threading technique you mentioned. Would this create an easier feed to the printer or "smaller" file size?
I had wanted to create a file that didn't require Excel as the data source, so I created one using SEQ fields. It was terrible and too huge to mention (thanks Doug Robbins), so I recreated it using Word as the data source so that people who only have Word can use it. You can create up to 5,000 tickets without changing the data file. If you only have Word and need to create more than 5,000 tickets, please don't type the ticket numbers. Just drop me an email and I'll create another data file for you with the required numbers.

I came across this website that explained how to do it using Microsoft's "Raffle Ticket" template (https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-create-numbered-tickets-in-word). However, when I tried to update the sequences as the article said, I could not find the option to update the field (I think they were referring to the option "edit field"), after copying and pasting the template onto a second page.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
I am getting my tickets to number on one side of it. However, I am needing my tickets to have the number on each side, but one side will not number. I have tried several times and it will not number on both sides. I am using an avery template that is printing 10 tickets per page, stub and tearable ticket. But the stub will not number while the tearable ticket will.
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