If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
The national ISBN agency assigns the registrant element (cf. Category:ISBN agencies) and an accompanying series of ISBNs within that registrant element to the publisher; the publisher then allocates one of the ISBNs to each of its books. In most countries, a book publisher is not required by law to assign an ISBN; however, most bookstores only handle ISBN bearing publications.[citation needed]
As you just learned in the previous step, page numbering isn't autonomous in sections by default. You must break the connection between the two sections. To break the connection between the first and second sections, click Link To Previous on the Header And Footer toolbar. (If you closed the header in the last step, reopen it and Word will display the Header And Footer toolbar.) In Word 2007 and 2010, click the Design context tab | Link To Previous (in the Navigation group).
I agree, MS documentation completely fails concerning multilevel lists. Additionally, it is not even close to being intuitive. But more than that, the controls for it are actually ambiguous and misleading. Then too…..there are still bugs in it. To be fair, there is nothing simple about this operation….but still….Microsoft, you've got bzillions of folks and could do this a little better. Whem my multilevel lists start going squirrely on me I usually make sure my active cursor is located in my list and then click >multilevel list>define new multilevel list. I check everything is set the way I want (it usually is) and hit "ok." So that seems to just refresh everything and set the list straight again. I don't know if it actually does define a new one (or how I would ever select it again if I wanted to) but that works best for me until MS fixes it.
1. digit, figure. 2. Number, sum both imply the total of two or more units. Number applies to the result of a count or estimate in which the units are considered as individuals; it is used of groups of persons or things: to have a number of items on the agenda. Sum applies to the result of addition, in which only the total is considered: a large sum of money. 20. copy, edition.
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