Kate Cahill is a graphic designer, writer, and creative director who has developed content for print and web. As creative director, she has produced award-winning work for agencies focused on the pharmaceutical and health and beauty aid industries. She has also served as production manager, with responsibility for the successful fulfillment of long-run print contracts. Kate has been delivering training for Webucator clients since 2010. Her enthusiasm for cutting-edge technology, combined with hands-on practical experience, brings an added benefit to her classes. Kate teaches real-world techniques and integration of Adobe software, as well as Microsoft PowerPoint, to produce a fully developed and cohesive brand identity.
Notice that the Font option (when you applied italics) changes only the number, not the heading text. To update the heading text, modify the heading style as you normally would. Word assumes you want all Heading 1 and Heading 2 styles included in the new numbering scheme. If you want to omit a heading level from the scheme, don't use a built-in heading style to format those headings.
In the Bullet or Number Position section, set the Alignment to Right. The Left Indent is where the text will start. The First Line Indent is the amount of space that should be subtracted from the left indent to determine where the period after the number will be positioned. This was determined in the first step with the spacing placeholder text. Leave Tab Position blank and check Preview to see the options take effect in the highlighted text. Make any needed adjustments to the positions, and when you are satisfied, click OK.
The Standard Book Numbering (SBN) code is a 9-digit commercial book identifier system created by Gordon Foster, Emeritus Professor of Statistics at Trinity College, Dublin,[3] for the booksellers and stationers WHSmith and others in 1965.[4] The ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 in the United Kingdom by David Whitaker[5] (regarded as the "Father of the ISBN"[6]) and in 1968 in the United States by Emery Koltay[5] (who later became director of the U.S. ISBN agency R.R. Bowker).[6][7][8] numbering using indesign
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