Publisher 2010 includes various typography commands that are designed to help you embellish your text. Although Publisher's developers have touted this as a significant feature, it's important to note that many of these effects only work with a small number of fonts, such as Calibri, Cambria, and Gabriola. Still, if you're using these fonts the typography commands can enhance the appearance of your text.
In its first versions, the CDR file format was a completely proprietary file format primarily used for vector graphic drawings, recognizable by the first two bytes of the file being "WL". Starting with CorelDraw 3, the file format changed to a Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF) envelope, recognizable by the first four bytes of the file being "RIFF", and a "CDR*vrsn" in bytes 9 to 15, with the asterisk "*" being in early versions just a blank.[33] Beginning with CorelDraw 4 it included the version number of the writing program in hexadecimal ("4" meaning version 4, "D" meaning version 14). The actual data chunk of the RIFF remains a Corel proprietary format.

There are four dimension line tools, parallel vertical / horizontal, angular and segment. The Parallel dimension tool allows you to draw dimension lines on any angle. To draw a parallel dimension line, click the Parallel dimension tool in the toolbox. To draw a vertical or horizontal dimension line, open the Dimension tools flyout by clicking the arrow in the bottom-right corner of the Parallel dimension tool button in the toolbox, and click the Horizontal or Vertical dimension tool button.
Now go to File > Export > File format, and choose .CPT. In the export dialog, now choose Maintain Layers. It will convert all layers with curve objects, into individual objects in Corel PHOTO-PAINT, with the names retained. So remember to place all curves into individual layers in CorelDRAW before exporting to CPT. If you’re working for print choose 300 dpi of course, and make sure that you work in the same color space etcetera.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:

So now on the A master page in your Adobe InDesign document you should have a capital A in the text frame that we created. This is more than just a capital A though, this represents the A master in your Adobe Indesign document and it means that on every page that is attached to your A master the corresponding page number will appear in that position on your page.
From time to time, I'm hired to design a mascot for a sports team. These tend to be some of my favorite projects, but also some of the more challenging projects as well. I tend to look at a mascot design like an icon for a logo. There are many similarities between the two. First the image should be clear and easy for the viewer to make out. I prefer to use simple shapes to make a somewhat more complicated image, but not too complicated. I want it to be stylized, not ultra-realistic. I also want something that is easily produced on apparel, signs, print and more. The goal is to make the design look like it was easy to create, even if it wasn't.

I would like to number a voucher book, i have place 4 vouchers on a page, the thing is that i want each of these vouchers to start with different number, 100, 200, 300, 400, and then i want to number them 99 times. The problem is that they have to be numbered only 1 per page, so that when i have printed them all i can easily crop them and staple them right up with having to go through it all.
Applying a character style to your bullet or numbered list character allows you to apply any formatting you want … except for an underline. Even the activation of the underline option in the character style settings will result in InDesign completely ignoring you. For some reason this feature is unfortunately unsupported so it’s up to you to try to be creative with this. One possibility would be to use a Paragraph Rule (if possible) and just play with the Left- and Right Indent.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
We'll work with the existing heading styles. When applying this technique to your own documents, you can modify the heading styles to reflect the properties you need—you're not stuck with the default settings. If, however, the built-in heading styles are already in use because you're working with an existing document, you'll have to create new styles. Avoid this route when possible. We'll be changing properties for the numbering scheme and not the actual heading styles.
Now it’s time to add some color. Once again I used the Smart Fill Tool to add some new shapes that I would apply color to. With a shape selected, simply click on a color from the Color Palette or create a new color by clicking on the current color square located below in the bottom, right-hand corner of the Status Bar. It was important to have a limited color scheme for this design. So this design has two shades of green, two shades of tan, black and red.
The next step depends on what you are most comfortable using. You could start sketching things out in CorelDRAW, maybe use a graphics tablet, or in my case I like to use an old fashioned pencil and pad of paper. I have a small notepad that I doodle in, but sometimes I might make small sketches on post-it notes. I like to make my sketches small because I feel like those small thumbnail drawings lend themselves well to simple and clean layouts. The larger my sketches are, the more detail I tend to create and for projects like this you don't always need a bunch of detail. My sketches aren't pretty. They are just supposed to get me in the ball park (no pun intended). You just want to get a basic look and feel to work from. Don't get discouraged if your sketches aren't exactly what you had in mind. You will be able to fine-tune the design as you go. I created several little thumbnail sketches. And pick one, sometimes two, to build from.
In the Adobe InDesign document I’m working on here we actually have two master pages, an ‘A’ master and a ‘B’ master so I’m going to select both the left and right hand page frames with the special character in on my ‘A’ master and go to Edit>Copy. I’m then going to double click on my ‘B’ master page and go to Edit>Paste in place. this will then copy the special character and position it in exactly the same place as it appears on my ‘A’ master.
If you have multiple sections in your document, you can change the header and footer for the first page of each section. Say you were writing a book with different chapters and you had each chapter set up in its own section. If you didn’t want the regular header and footer (and page numbers) showing up on the first page of each section, you can just place your insertion point somewhere in that section and then enable the “Different First Page” option.
The next step depends on what you are most comfortable using. You could start sketching things out in CorelDRAW, maybe use a graphics tablet, or in my case I like to use an old fashioned pencil and pad of paper. I have a small notepad that I doodle in, but sometimes I might make small sketches on post-it notes. I like to make my sketches small because I feel like those small thumbnail drawings lend themselves well to simple and clean layouts. The larger my sketches are, the more detail I tend to create and for projects like this you don't always need a bunch of detail. My sketches aren't pretty. They are just supposed to get me in the ball park (no pun intended). You just want to get a basic look and feel to work from. Don't get discouraged if your sketches aren't exactly what you had in mind. You will be able to fine-tune the design as you go. I created several little thumbnail sketches. And pick one, sometimes two, to build from.
I love working with bullets and numbered lists in InDesign, I think it’s a quick and easy way to add some structure to your lists or title formats in your document. But I often see people avoiding this option because they think it’s either hard to master or complicated to manage. Let’s go over a few quick formatting tips when working with bullets and numbered lists in InDesign.
A brochure can be an effective way to present information about your business, product, or service to prospective clients. You can produce your own 3- or 4-panel brochures in Microsoft Publisher, using either its selection of built-in templates or, with practice, you can make one from scratch, and you can customize it with such features as reply forms and an address section. Following are instructions in how to create brochures using Microsoft Publisher 2003, 2007, and 2010.
Decide whether your brochure is to be handed out or mailed. If you plan to mail your brochure to prospective customers, you'll want to allow panel space for a mailing and return address. (You supply the mailing addresses from a mail merge from a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet or a Microsoft Access database.) If you plan to hand it out instead, you won't need to allow panel space for a mailing address, although you'll likely want to have your company name and address on the brochure.
CorelDRAW allows you to easily add various types of dimensioning lines and call-outs. By using dimension lines, you can indicate the distance between two points in a drawing or the size of objects. By default, dimension lines and the measurements shown on the lines change when you change an objects size. This is referred to as dynamic dimensioning and can be very useful if you need to resize an object or group of objects and want to avoid having to recreate the dimensioning lines.
Each document in your book can be numbered, and these numbers can be used as automatic chapter numbers. Automatic will increment from the previous document’s number, or you can choose “Same as Previous in Book” if it’s still the same chapter but broken into two or more parts, or you can arbitrarily number it anything you want to. This can save time if you have a large number of chapters that change order frequently, since the numbers will update automatically.
This simple technique makes quick work of a single-level numbered list and accommodates multiple lists within the same document. However, it doesn't work with multilevel lists. If you must work with an existing document, modify the heading style as shown above. Then, select each heading and apply the heading style that you modified by adding a numbering scheme. As I mentioned, this isn't possible if the existing document already employs the heading style. But if you face numbering headings in a document, you know you've got the request covered—and you won't lose a minute's composure. Just tell them, "Yes, I can do that."

In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
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