There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.
ROGER WAMBOLT is the owner of ADART Graphics, an Ottawa-based graphics training company that supports new and experienced graphic designers. Roger has a gift for explaining the "how to" in a fun and accessible way. His graphics career began more than seventeen years ago in the trenches at Corel, providing graphics support to users and, over the years, building a team and establishing relationships with graphics professionals at all levels and in a variety of verticals, including print, sublimation, screen printing, sign making, engraving, and embroidery. A CorelDRAW Graphics Suite expert, Roger is a popular presenter at industry tradeshows. He has developed and conducted classroom training and online sessions throughout North America and has authored articles for key industry magazines, including SQE Professional.

3.  Although you could type the names directly into the word, it is easier to use your favorite word processing program. Type in the names you want, leaving an extra space between them. You could also put a dash or dot between the names. Just type the names end-to-end and let them go to the next line automatically as you type (do not use a “carriage return”).  Use a plain typeface with a point size of 12 to 14.  Figure 3.
I am trying to customize our Oracle Receivables invoice program for Release 12.0.6. I am modifying the seeded RAXINV.rdf because I need to add three fields into the query. I am adding the three columns in the data model and the Common Query user parameter. I am planning on using BIP to customize the layout. The issue I have with modifying the custom RAXINV.rdf is this. Everytime I modify the data model and the COmmon Query parameter, some of the object names change by appending a "1" to the object name (i.e. BILL_CUST_NAME become BILL_CUST_NAME1). Is there a better way of customizing the invoice? I would like to by pass Oracle Reports if at all possible.

I’m unable to access Numbering & Section Options from the Master page (it’s greyed out). I had already manually ‘told’ all the files in my Book where to start, using the Numbering & Section Options from the Layout toolbar (I didn’t know it could be done through the Pages menu). They still show up in the Book listing as starting from page 1, though. I had to juggle between the Document Setup on the File toolbar and the …Options from Layout to get the page numbers to come right. As I have a lot of illustrations throughout the Book, I’d like to have the correct page numbers come up so I can easily find and acknowledge them.

23 Feb 2010[23] X5 (15) 7 to X5 7 to X5 XP, Vista, 7, 8 Built-in content organizer (CorelConnect), CD, web graphics and animation tools, multi-core performance improvement, digital content (professional fonts, clip arts, and photos), object hinting, pixel view, enhanced Mesh tool with transparency options, added touch support, and new supported file formats.[24] It has developed Transformation, which makes multiple copies of a single object.
Step two is to brainstorm and gather reference images. Reference images don't just have to be images of what you plan on drawing and in some cases you may not know exactly what you are drawing until you have options. While browsing the internet you may come across a logo with a color theme you really like, or perhaps you like the lettering style or font used on a different design. I spend a good deal of time getting inspired but taking care to not let the images I find influence my design too much. The goal is to make something unique. I create a new file in CorelDRAW and name it. Then I browse the internet looking for inspiration. If I find something I like, I copy then paste it in that new CorelDRAW file. You can also utilize Corel CONNECT to browse content. To do this I recommend, in CorelDRAW, going to Windows > Dockers > Connect. Once the docker is visible at the top of the docker you can search for images. I really like searching for reference photos on iStock. If you plan on using the image you find in a design, you must purchase the image so you can legally use it.

Anyway, one of the cardinal rules in my kitchen is that the best tools are the most versatile ones. Sure, I did once buy a combination avocado pitter and masher. But it ended up in the trash as I found guacamole came out just as good when I used a fork. Likewise, some of my favorite InDesign tools can be used for all kinds of purposes. Take for example cross-references. In issue 95 of InDesign Magazine, Peter Kahrel showed how to use cross-references to overcome all kinds of tricky problems with footnotes. You can also use cross-references to do cool stuff like automatically type the last page number in a book, which is not possible to do with a text variable since the scope of text variables is limited to the current document. Here’s how to do it.
The steps in this article are going to show you how to add page numbers to the pages of your Publisher document. The page number will appear on every page of your document, at the location that you choose. Note that page numbers will also be included on any new pages that you add after inserting the page numbers, and they will update automatically if you delete any of the existing pages from the document.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.

In the Object Manager Docker, click on New Lens again and choose Tone Curve Lens. For my photo I applied a small S-curve, dragging the lower left side down, giving me a tone value of X 74 and Y 45, which works great. You don’t nee to be too exact here with the value. This way I get a darker and more defined feel and removing that milky grey feel the photo originally had. Decide for yourself by looking at the effect as you adjust the image. Go with what works for your image. And go back and adjust again if needed later on.


So now on the A master page in your Adobe InDesign document you should have a capital A in the text frame that we created. This is more than just a capital A though, this represents the A master in your Adobe Indesign document and it means that on every page that is attached to your A master the corresponding page number will appear in that position on your page.

Bullets and Numbering options in InDesign aren’t just for boring lists. You can auto-number items like captions, even incorporating prefixes like figure labels. Depending on how your document is set up, there are two ways to achieve this. Both involve setting up a paragraph style that incorporates numbering from the Bullets and Numbering feature. Generally I create a temporary text frame—often on my pasteboard—and set some items to create my style, pasting the text into my actual caption frames after the fact.


Each document in your book can be numbered, and these numbers can be used as automatic chapter numbers. Automatic will increment from the previous document’s number, or you can choose “Same as Previous in Book” if it’s still the same chapter but broken into two or more parts, or you can arbitrarily number it anything you want to. This can save time if you have a large number of chapters that change order frequently, since the numbers will update automatically.
GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.
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