Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.

Like Microsoft Word, Publisher also lets you add page numbers to your document. This is a special element of the document, as the page number function is smart enough to manually adjust itself in the event that something changes the number of pages in the document. This makes it (typically) preferable to a manual page numbering system that could become incorrect if the number or order of pages changes. Our tutorial below will show you how to insert page numbers in Publisher 2013.
Warning  Making even minor changes to an outline numbering scheme won't necessarily change the initial position you've selected in the gallery, but rather may create a new gallery position, overwriting an existing one. Because of this problem, attaching numbering to styles is strongly recommended. This is covered in greater detail later in this chapter and in the chapter on Styles.
InDesign is a popular publishing software application released by Adobe. It is often used by graphic designers to publish books, magazines and brochures. Along with important elements like text, graphics and logos, page numbers are essential to these publications. It is possible to add the page numbers during or after the document's completion, if you know where to look. This article will tell you how to add page numbers in InDesign.
My take on this book was more a tutorial than a learning experience. It wasn't what I was personally looking for, but a great book none the less. This book is for the learner that is just getting started with this program. If you are looking for a great starter package. This book is it. It will open the beginning doors of Corel for you. Lots of educational info.
Formatted number used for sound recordings, printed music, other music-related materials, and video recordings. Publisher's and distributor's numbers that are given in an unformatted form are recorded in field 500. A print constant identifying the kind of publisher or distributor number may be generated based on the value in the first indicator position. Repeatable for multiple numbers associated with an item.

Anyway, one of the cardinal rules in my kitchen is that the best tools are the most versatile ones. Sure, I did once buy a combination avocado pitter and masher. But it ended up in the trash as I found guacamole came out just as good when I used a fork. Likewise, some of my favorite InDesign tools can be used for all kinds of purposes. Take for example cross-references. In issue 95 of InDesign Magazine, Peter Kahrel showed how to use cross-references to overcome all kinds of tricky problems with footnotes. You can also use cross-references to do cool stuff like automatically type the last page number in a book, which is not possible to do with a text variable since the scope of text variables is limited to the current document. Here’s how to do it.
 	Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.

Most of the people will tell you that Adobe's are better. Well, I use Adobe because I love Photoshop (I haven't seen any other software so powerful for photographs) and it's got a wider range of users. But, for certain tasks, I use Corel Draw, and I always say to myself "isn't this a great piece of software". It has nothing to envy to others. But it is a case of personal preference.
The fill tool allows you to set the fill pattern and color of your object. If you set it to “no fill” it will be transparent. If you set it to “uniform fill” it will just be one color. If you use “fountain fill” you can make a gradient of colors. You can also fill with a pattern or a texture or use “postscript fill” which allows for parametrized patterns.
3.  Although you could type the names directly into the word, it is easier to use your favorite word processing program. Type in the names you want, leaving an extra space between them. You could also put a dash or dot between the names. Just type the names end-to-end and let them go to the next line automatically as you type (do not use a “carriage return”).  Use a plain typeface with a point size of 12 to 14.  Figure 3.

I should mention that the kind of bitmap I have selected here is probably not going to make a good object. It's more for line art and logos.If you were to look closely at the conversion of the bitmap you would find that it has create hundreds (thousands?) of arbitrary regions which it has filled with different colors. I have yet to find anything I could do to such an object that I couldn't do with the original bitmap. Still -- pretty nifty! In this case, I only wanted to show the dialog box, not the result so it's OK.


I’m having a strange problem: I have created a paragraph style for header which also has a number options and level. Like “1. First chapter” I would like to have the number “1.” regular and the header “First chapter” italic, but somehow, even if my number use a character style with regular on it, it will show as italic… I’m stuck… unless it’a another Indesign click…
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)

While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
If you have multiple sections in your document, you can change the header and footer for the first page of each section. Say you were writing a book with different chapters and you had each chapter set up in its own section. If you didn’t want the regular header and footer (and page numbers) showing up on the first page of each section, you can just place your insertion point somewhere in that section and then enable the “Different First Page” option.
One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
It sure is possible! Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. Insert a Current Page Number marker (Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number) in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended), select the first page of your section, open the Numbering and Section Options dialog, and enter 200 in the Start Page Numbering at: field. Hope this helps!
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.

At the top of the page you can choose the number of columns and rows of plaques you want to print. We currently have one plaque set up on the page. We need to change this to maximize the number we can fit on the engraving page. Since we have a full 24" across the table to use, and each plaque takes up 6" horizontally we can fit 4 plaques across the table, and two rows of plaques.
Now that you’ve created the separate section, you can change the format of the page numbers there. The first thing you’ll want to do is break the link between your new preliminary section and the next section where the main body of your document starts. To do that, open up the header or footer area (wherever you have your page numbers) in the main section of your document. On the “Design” tab in the “Header & Footer Tools” section of the Ribbon, click the “Link to Previous” option to break the link to the previous section’s header and footer.
As a vector graphics editor, CorelDraw is used primarily for marketing and advertising businesses, particularly those that specialize in print advertising development. Outside of logos, CorelDraw is a program used in the professional space to create brochures, newsletters and various other printable documents using its page layout features. Furthermore users use the program to create complex drawings.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
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