Hi Jason! Hard to say when I’m not sure which part isn’t working for you. If the numbering isn’t continuing across separate frames, you need to make sure you’re using a list. If they are in the wrong order, remember it uses the paste/creation order to number them. If neither of those fix it, let me know what specific issue you’re having. Good luck!
The selection tool is the very first tool in the tool bar on the left (see image). It has a rectangular picker and a freehand picker but most of the time you will simply click on an object. It helps if you click on an edge. One caveat: if there are multiple objects and some are in front of some others the program will select the object that’s in front. In those cases you can use the “Object Manager” (tool->object manager) to get the exact object you want. More on this in step 10.
You will occasionally want to place an unnumbered paragraph in the middle of a sequence, but the moment you hit Enter, another paragraph number pops up. To fix this, toggle paragraph numbering off by pressing the paragraph numbering button you used for the previous paragraph. (If you use the button’s drop-down, choose None as the numbering scheme.) Unfortunately, the paragraph settings won’t revert to Normal here; it’ll usually have the paragraph indented 0.25. Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+Q to strip paragraph settings out, then revise the formatting as you wish.
This is a good book for someone that is new to Corel Draw, and needs to use Corel Draw for publications. The book is a mix of publication and graphic basics, nd how to implement those basics in Corel Draw. The book is not designed to be a manual on all the features of Corel Draw, and may not cover everything for publications either, but it definitely gets one started. If one needs to make a decision between buying Corel Draw and other software that might be cheaper and more simple to use, this book can make buying Corel Draw worthwhile because it gets you going on features and methods not brought upfront by Corel or in Corel's user manual that comes with the software.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
Use "Format Page Numbers" for specific changes, like types of numbers and chapter headings. If you want to go the extra mile, double-click on the header or footer once again. Click "Page Numbers," then click "Format Page Numbers" under the menu that appears. From here, you can set different types of numbers, like Roman numerals or letters, as well as customize the basic appearance of numbers. It is not incredibly robust, but it works.
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Starting an auto-numbered paragraph is deceptively simple. See those buttons on the top row of the Paragraph section of the Home tab? The left-most one is for bullets; the next two to its right are for numbering and multi-level numbering, respectively. Simply click the button to toggle the feature on, or click on the drop-down arrow on each button to select a specific style. If you don’t like any of the delivered choices, you can click Define New to set your own.
One of the key components of CorelDraw is its brushes. According to the Corel Corporation themselves, CorelDraw uses specially designed brushes to help with detailed image creation. These brushes give the designer the ability to create realistic or incredibly stylized images. In addition to its various brushes, CorelDraw also incorporates the use of layers. Through layers, graphics designers are able to create pictures that overlap each other without interacting. Layers help with different aspects of image creation, such as shading and coloring.
A request for numbering headings in a new document doesn't have to elicit terror—it only sounds ghoulish. If you're good with styles, you might consider a custom numbered list style, but that's too much work. Instead, use Word's built-in heading styles for a painless process. My best advice is to get the numbering scheme in place before you create the document. Trying to number headings in an existing document really can cause nightmares!
Step two is to brainstorm and gather reference images. Reference images don't just have to be images of what you plan on drawing and in some cases you may not know exactly what you are drawing until you have options. While browsing the internet you may come across a logo with a color theme you really like, or perhaps you like the lettering style or font used on a different design. I spend a good deal of time getting inspired but taking care to not let the images I find influence my design too much. The goal is to make something unique. I create a new file in CorelDRAW and name it. Then I browse the internet looking for inspiration. If I find something I like, I copy then paste it in that new CorelDRAW file. You can also utilize Corel CONNECT to browse content. To do this I recommend, in CorelDRAW, going to Windows > Dockers > Connect. Once the docker is visible at the top of the docker you can search for images. I really like searching for reference photos on iStock. If you plan on using the image you find in a design, you must purchase the image so you can legally use it.
A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.

Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.
I’m unable to access Numbering & Section Options from the Master page (it’s greyed out). I had already manually ‘told’ all the files in my Book where to start, using the Numbering & Section Options from the Layout toolbar (I didn’t know it could be done through the Pages menu). They still show up in the Book listing as starting from page 1, though. I had to juggle between the Document Setup on the File toolbar and the …Options from Layout to get the page numbers to come right. As I have a lot of illustrations throughout the Book, I’d like to have the correct page numbers come up so I can easily find and acknowledge them.

At the top of the page you can choose the number of columns and rows of plaques you want to print. We currently have one plaque set up on the page. We need to change this to maximize the number we can fit on the engraving page. Since we have a full 24" across the table to use, and each plaque takes up 6" horizontally we can fit 4 plaques across the table, and two rows of plaques.
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
1.  Open Corel Draw (almost any version).  Create the word or class year. The word or number should be a bold typeface to allow plenty of room for words inside.  The example uses a typeface called Impact.  You could use Collegiate or other similar faces.  Make sure the object has no fill and has a thin black outline (to be changed later). Figure 1.

Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.


Erica Gamet has been involved in the graphics industry for an unbelievable 30 years! She is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other print- and production-related topics. She is a regular presence at CreativePro Week’s PePcon and InDesign Conferences, and has spoken at ebookcraft in Canada and Making Design in Norway. You can find Erica’s online tutorials at CreativeLive and through her YouTube channel. When she isn’t at her computer, she can be found exploring her new homebase of Seattle and the greater Pacific Northwest.
Anyway, one of the cardinal rules in my kitchen is that the best tools are the most versatile ones. Sure, I did once buy a combination avocado pitter and masher. But it ended up in the trash as I found guacamole came out just as good when I used a fork. Likewise, some of my favorite InDesign tools can be used for all kinds of purposes. Take for example cross-references. In issue 95 of InDesign Magazine, Peter Kahrel showed how to use cross-references to overcome all kinds of tricky problems with footnotes. You can also use cross-references to do cool stuff like automatically type the last page number in a book, which is not possible to do with a text variable since the scope of text variables is limited to the current document. Here’s how to do it.
We have a variable 'invLines' and we are loading the members of the G_LINES group where the TYPE is equal to 'LINE'. Notice we use an XPATH expression to do this. We also use the 'incontext' command to ensure we are picking up the lines only for the current position i.e. within the current invoice. For this example remember we have no invoice header so we pick up all lines into the tree.
Erica Gamet has been involved in the graphics industry for an unbelievable 30 years! She is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other print- and production-related topics. She is a regular presence at CreativePro Week’s PePcon and InDesign Conferences, and has spoken at ebookcraft in Canada and Making Design in Norway. You can find Erica’s online tutorials at CreativeLive and through her YouTube channel. When she isn’t at her computer, she can be found exploring her new homebase of Seattle and the greater Pacific Northwest.
Bart started his career as a graphic designer in 2001, specialising in print production and image retouching. After this he became an Adobe Certified Instructor, doing classroom training for various companies and covering a broad range of Adobe solutions. He's a renowned speaker at conferences in Europe, Australia and the United States and has written many articles on Adobe's print and e-publishing solutions. Bart recently joined Adobe Systems as a Solutions Consultant where he continues his passion for creative software.
17 Jan 2006[20] X3 (13) X3 † 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, X3 2000, 2003, XP (32-bit, 64-bit), Vista(32-bit only), 7, 8 Double click Crop tool (the first vector software able to crop groups of vectors and bitmap images at the same time), Smart fill tool, Chamfer/Fillet/Scallop/Emboss tool, Image Adjustment Lab. Trace became integrated inside Draw under the name PowerTrace.
The book have many examples, and those examples come with tutorials. However, the tutorials are design specific, and apply to the example. For instance, a logo is created of a lighthouse. You learn some features of Corel, but its not meant to show all the features of Corel. One drawback of the book is that it relies on keyboard shortcuts and does not tell you where to go in the application on many instances. But, I believe the book is more or less trying to go through the methodology of using Corel, not showing you a step by step for every function. If the book had more concentration on using the mouse and where to find features in the user interface, and for screen captures, I would have rated it a 5-star.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
My take on this book was more a tutorial than a learning experience. It wasn't what I was personally looking for, but a great book none the less. This book is for the learner that is just getting started with this program. If you are looking for a great starter package. This book is it. It will open the beginning doors of Corel for you. Lots of educational info.
To add curves to the straight lines, select the Shape Tool (Toolbox > Shape Tool or keyboard shortcut F10). With the Shape Tool selected right-click on a straight line and select To Curve. Now you can click and drag on the line with the left mouse button to manipulate the new curve you just created. If you need to move nodes, you can do so by clicking and dragging that node to a new position using the Shape Tool.
In its first versions, the CDR file format was a completely proprietary file format primarily used for vector graphic drawings, recognizable by the first two bytes of the file being "WL". Starting with CorelDraw 3, the file format changed to a Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF) envelope, recognizable by the first four bytes of the file being "RIFF", and a "CDR*vrsn" in bytes 9 to 15, with the asterisk "*" being in early versions just a blank.[33] Beginning with CorelDraw 4 it included the version number of the writing program in hexadecimal ("4" meaning version 4, "D" meaning version 14). The actual data chunk of the RIFF remains a Corel proprietary format.
One of the most requested features on the forum for RTF templates is to show a fixed number of rows per page. Maybe you have pre-printed stationary that can only take a certain number of lines, maybe you have a functional requirement for it. For whatever the reason id the functional folks have given it to you to implement.  Up until now there has been a template floating around that I think I let loose that shows how this can be done for invoices. There is little explanation of whats going on and how it's done. I'll try and make ammends to those of you that may have gotten a little lost but plugged it in anyway and it worked so what the heck.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this: how to number using indesign
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