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A request for numbering headings in a new document doesn't have to elicit terror—it only sounds ghoulish. If you're good with styles, you might consider a custom numbered list style, but that's too much work. Instead, use Word's built-in heading styles for a painless process. My best advice is to get the numbering scheme in place before you create the document. Trying to number headings in an existing document really can cause nightmares!
Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers
Click on the section of the document to which you want content added. Your document will feature multiple frames, into which text or pictures can be added. In most cases, Publisher places example text and photos in each template to provide you with a general idea of how to write and format your document. For example, if creating an envelope, Publisher inserts dummy addresses in the appropriate text frames on the document so you can replace the text with your own information.

I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
From version X4 (14) on, the CDR file is a ZIP-compressed directory of several files, among them XML-files and the RIFF-structured riffdata.cdr with the familiar version signature in versions X4 (CDREvrsn) and X5 (CDRFvrsn), and a root.dat with CorelDraw X6, where the bytes 9 to 15 look slightly different -- "CDRGfver" in a file created with X6. "F" was the last valid hex digit, and the "fver" now indicates that the letter before does no longer stand for a hex digit.
The values for Number position (here called Aligned at), Text indent and Follow number with are in the Position section at the bottom. With multi-level numbering, you also have easy access to settings that control the type of numbering at each level, the characters before and after each level’s numbers (period versus parenthesis), and the list number style (1, a, I, etc.).

Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
Would you like to learn to create sharp, powerful graphics for your own small business? Have you been tasked with designing brochures, business cards, sales or feature sheets, slides, or other graphic materials for your employer? If you have an eye for design and a basic knowledge of computers, with the help of CorelDRAW Graphics Suite and BRING IT HOME WITH CORELDRAW: A GUIDE TO IN-HOUSE GRAPHIC DESIGN, you can start producing impressive, professional-looking ads and marketing materials today. The book's step-by-step guidance and wealth of tips, tricks, and techniques will quickly teach you the fundamentals of clear, effective visual communication and how to structure compelling promotional pieces and ads for your company. Along the way, you'll learn: • How to set up and customize CorelDRAW to make things easier. • The basic elements of design, including typography, color, and resolution. • How to create layouts with ease, including the use of templates and styles. • How to produce company ID packages and a variety of collateral pieces. • The best way to get your finished pieces from CorelDRAW to the printer. Learn to create eye-catching marketing materials that are easy on the budget. BRING IT HOME WITH CORELDRAW: A GUIDE TO IN-HOUSE GRAPHIC DESIGN is your fast, friendly guide to producing great-looking graphics in-house.
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.
InDesign’s automatic page numbers work well enough, but what about special cases? Some documents require pages to be omitted from total page counts. Other documents use several different systems. Sometimes section numbers or special codes must be included. Well, don’t start typing in those numbers manually, because InDesign can handle it—and quite gracefully, too.
The values for Number position (here called Aligned at), Text indent and Follow number with are in the Position section at the bottom. With multi-level numbering, you also have easy access to settings that control the type of numbering at each level, the characters before and after each level’s numbers (period versus parenthesis), and the list number style (1, a, I, etc.).
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
24 Aug 1995[12] 6 3, 4, 5, 6 5, 6 95 This is the first version which was made exclusively for 32-bit Windows. New features were customizable interface, Polygon, Spiral, Knife and Eraser tools. Corel Memo, Corel Presents, Corel Motion 3D, Corel Depth, Corel Multimedia Manager, Corel Font Master and Corel DREAM (for 3D modelling) were included in the suite.
This is a good book for someone that is new to Corel Draw, and needs to use Corel Draw for publications. The book is a mix of publication and graphic basics, nd how to implement those basics in Corel Draw. The book is not designed to be a manual on all the features of Corel Draw, and may not cover everything for publications either, but it definitely gets one started. If one needs to make a decision between buying Corel Draw and other software that might be cheaper and more simple to use, this book can make buying Corel Draw worthwhile because it gets you going on features and methods not brought upfront by Corel or in Corel's user manual that comes with the software.
Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.
Now, right-click the Background object and choose Duplicate. Go to New Lens > Grayscale. You now have two obejcts of the brick wall. Choose New Lens > Grayscale, drag the Opacity slider, in my case, to 80. Go to Merge Mode > Overlay. This creates a more intense feel to the brick wall. This places the Grayscale Lens Object over the duplicated brick wall photo object.
3.  Although you could type the names directly into the word, it is easier to use your favorite word processing program. Type in the names you want, leaving an extra space between them. You could also put a dash or dot between the names. Just type the names end-to-end and let them go to the next line automatically as you type (do not use a “carriage return”).  Use a plain typeface with a point size of 12 to 14.  Figure 3.

Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.

Roger Wambolt, senior product trainer at Corel, eases in with an exploration of the interface and touches on the major players in the toolbox: the Pick, Shape, Crop, Curve, and Interactive tools. Then, once you know how to draw simple lines and shapes, he shows how to group, copy, and adjust objects on your document page. Plus, learn about working with text, using the new Font Manager and the extensive library of fonts in CorelDRAW, adding and editing images, automating tasks with scripts and macros, creating color palettes, and preparing your CorelDRAW projects for print. Roger closes with some tips on customizing the CorelDRAW interface to be more productive and create your designs in fewer steps.
- [Voiceover] If you're creating a multi-page document, there may be a need to use page numbering or create a master layer. Now, page numbering is fairly straightforward, but master layering may need a bit of an explanation. A master layer is a layer that will be displayed on all pages. What this means is that if I was to create a master layer, whatever I put on that layer will appear on all pages. I perfect an example of this is if I was creating a layout for a financial report and wanted a company logo to be on all pages, then I'd put it on a master layer. From my Object Manager, I'm going to left click on this black triangle, and then I'm going to select New Master Layer all pages. Now, if I go over to my tool box, I'm going to grab my rectangle tool. I'm gonna left click and drag. I'll create a small rectangle here. I'm going to give that a solid color, and let's just do another object here as well, and I'll give that a slight bit different color. So we can pretend this is…

One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.

We'll work with the existing heading styles. When applying this technique to your own documents, you can modify the heading styles to reflect the properties you need—you're not stuck with the default settings. If, however, the built-in heading styles are already in use because you're working with an existing document, you'll have to create new styles. Avoid this route when possible. We'll be changing properties for the numbering scheme and not the actual heading styles.
The selection tool is the very first tool in the tool bar on the left (see image). It has a rectangular picker and a freehand picker but most of the time you will simply click on an object. It helps if you click on an edge. One caveat: if there are multiple objects and some are in front of some others the program will select the object that’s in front. In those cases you can use the “Object Manager” (tool->object manager) to get the exact object you want. More on this in step 10.

Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.


You can also set up page numbering so that the position of the page numbers is different on odd and even pages. You’ll find that most books take this approach so that the page number appears toward the left side on the left (even) pages and toward the right side on the right (odd) pages. This prevents the page numbers from being obscured by the book’s binding and makes them easier to see as you flip through pages.
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Now it was time to add a little character to these letters. I created small wedge shapes using the Freehand Tool. Then I snapped the shapes to the sides of each letter by making sure Snap to Objects was turned on. Go to: View > Snap To > Objects. Then I used the Align and Distribute feature to make sure all the wedges were aligned horizontally (Windows > Dockers > Align and Distribute or Ctrl+Shift+A), and welded those shapes to the letters. I created more wedges but instead of welding those, I used the Trim feature from the Property Bar to make wedge-shaped cut-outs in the letters instead.


If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.
We have a variable 'invLines' and we are loading the members of the G_LINES group where the TYPE is equal to 'LINE'. Notice we use an XPATH expression to do this. We also use the 'incontext' command to ensure we are picking up the lines only for the current position i.e. within the current invoice. For this example remember we have no invoice header so we pick up all lines into the tree.
I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.
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